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Class. 
Book. 




This school is in the beautiful citv of PoiMikei-u** midiS* i * 
Sew York, on the banks and amid the enchant" " e , e Hnl n'T ' 

v ample and commodious. The rooms ™°fe , v, , • f'"' 7' ' U ' 
^a,d to taste, convenience and ZC. T n e i ^ g & f' ^ ^ 
thorough. The teacher, in the s everal departments , "S ? "J*"™*' • 

Advantage, are provided for securing the 5£^5T^ "1 ° XPenen " 
learning afford. g " " ,m h om best institutions 

k| t ^^ t0e " <-'" • Hi" table h always ptotiMlv „„ K ,,i,,; „,„, ,.„„ ,„ 



REV. D. ft. WBTftTTT A 



HICKOK'S 






kj)<m 






327 Main Street, 

e 38 <o"0"<3t3E3e:k::e3:esx : »isxe. 




J". H . SICKOK, 

Wholesale .ind Retail Dealer in 

BflMKKS, S"tiY!@IIlI s 

PHOTO G R.iPil .*& B VMS, 

MUSIC, MUSICA'T INSTRUMENTS, ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

WALLETS, GOLD PENS, POCKET KNIVES, 

'AMI all kinds of 

FANCY STATIONERY. 



AGENT FOR 



Mason & Hamlin's CABINET ORGANS. 

Prince & Co.'s MELODEONS. 

Treat, Lindslev & Co.'s MELODEONS. 



WtlUAM C. HARRIS, 

No. I. FE R RYSTREET. an>SFishk illLaildmg. 



PAINTING^ ii^fe^ 




Gilding & Glazing. 



A good assortment of all kinds of Painting Materials, Neats Foot Oil, &c. 

Round, Square and Oval Portrait and Picture Frames of all the different 
styles, at 25 per cent below usual prices. 




SSO*€> 



The subscriber desirous ot reducing his extensive stock, with a view 
of selling; out his business, now offers at very reasonable prices a great 
variety of goods, consisting of 

Broadcloths, Cassimeres. Satinets, Kentucky Jeans & Cottonades. 

Also, various grades of Flannels, Plain, Twilled and Opera, an end- 
less amount of YANKEE XOTIOXS. White Goods, as Damasks, 
Napkins, Diapers, Towelling, Swiss and Cambric Muslins, Plain and 
Striped Nansooks, Linens, Hoop Skirts, Oil and "Wool Table Covers, 
and Floor Oil Cloths, Carpets, Mattings, 

Dress Goods, Plain and Figured Alpacas, Sec. 

Infinite variety of Boots and Shoes, together with all the Domestics, 
Calico, Delains, Sheeting and Shirtings, with a large and fine stock of 

Call and examine my stock. Orders respectfully solicited. 

JOHN 33CJBOIS, 

WAPPINCERS FALLS, N. Y. 



X ail & Ma,, 

4& 328 II A I IV STRfET, fyf 

'\^ X>OTJGr E3C EC H3 IE3 3F» Si X 3E3 , ^ 



DEALERS IX 



DRY GOODS, 
CRESS GOODS 

OF EVERY STYLE AND PRICES. 

(ffll-acJc and £?mwy (rjcbssime>r&s ; 
BLACK AND CLOAKING CLOTHS, 

CLOAKS & SHAWLS, 

GLOVES, HOStEBY, &0> f &C> 

PROMPTNESS IS OUR MOTTO ! SATISFACTION IS OUR AIM ! 



mmm 



AND 



DIRECTORY 



OF THE 



Till ©F F1SHK1LL 



WITH AN 



A P P E N I) I X 



OF MUCH USEFUL INFORMATION. 



DEAN AND SPAIGHT, 

PUBLISHERS. 



JAMES E. DEAN, 

FlSHKILL. 



JOHN W. SPAIGHT, 

Fishkill Landing 



Printed at the Standard Office, Fishkill Landing. 
1 8 G 6 . 



.F4 






INTRODUCTION. 

The present work is the first of the kind ever attempted in the 
Town of Fishkill, and the publishers issue it in the hope that what- 
ever it may contain of real value, will compensate for and cover any 
defects that maybe observed; and that it may lead to something- 
nearer perfection in the future. 
' The Historical Sketch by T. VAN Wyck Brinckerhoff, Esq., will 
be found quite full and valuable, aud is worth of preservation by 
every family. Among its especial features is the original Indian 
Deed of the town, copied from the manuscript, aud the old muster 
roll of Cr Swartwout's Company, also from the original document. 
The p s take this opportunity to extend their thanks to Mr. B., 

for his u . -ie assistance. 

The Appendix will be found valuable, and contains much that will 
be of interest and worth to every inhabitant of the Town. 

Partici;lar attention is called to the advertising pages. It is be- 
lieved that the parties who have thus put their business cards before 
the citizens of Fishkill, are reliable dealers, who will perform all they 
promise. 

Any information in regard to errors of fact in thib work, will be 
thankfully received by the publishers, and noted for future reference. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Appendix 138 

Abbreviations 8 

Banks 140 

Bands 152 

Base Ball Clubs 152 

Corrections 8 

Churcbes 150 

Corporation Officers of Fisbkill Landing 138 

Cemeteries 145 

Directory 100 

Freedmen's Relief Association 140 

Fire Departments 152 

Fisbkill Gas Ligbt Company 151 

Historical Sketch of Fisbkill 50 

Internal Revenue 152 

Manufactories 139 

Newspapers 149 

Public Buildiugs 149 

Post Offices 139 

Sunday Schools 145 

Societies 148 

Town Officers 138 

The Flower's Name 153 

Telegraph Office 139 

Transportation 140 

Twenty-First Regiment 140 

Villages 146 



C ft RECTIONS 



Beny, C. L., Xewburgh Bay Hotel, Long Wharf, Fishkill Lauding. 

Hales, Rev. J.T., M. E. Clergyman, Matteawan. 

Doughty, Dr. J. H. physician, do. 

Davis carriage maker, Matteawan. 

Fay, Joseph, billard saloon, do. 

Froehlieh, John, barber, Fishkill Landing. 

Green, carriage trimmer, do. 

Millard, John P., freighter, New Hamburgh. 

Millard, Samuel X., freighter, do. 

iSTorcross, L.AT. insurance agent. Fishkill Lauding. 

O'Brien, Dennis, laborer, Fishkill Landing. 

Smith, Anna, milliuer, do. 

Smith, Marion, milliner, do. 

Sloan, R. J., merchant tailor. Matteawan. 

Vassault, fancy goods, Fishkill Landing. 



ABBREVIATIONS 



Opp. opposite; n. near; bet. between; col'd, colored; do ditto; 
Pres. President ; IT. R. R., Hudson River Railroad ; mkr. maker. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



PAGE. 

Armstrong, A. W., stoves, bet. 137 & 138 

Atkins, 0. S., dry goods, bet. 105 & 106 

Belknap, Lynde,* flour, opp. 129 

Ball, E.. furnishing goods, bet. 137 & 138 

Bank of Fishkill, National, 143 

Bank of Fishkill Landing, First National, 141 

Clark, H. F , dentist, last outside cover 

Chapman, J. H. H., baker, bet. 129 & 130 

Carter & McCann, tobacco, opp. 138 

Candee & Co., dry goods, opp. 121 

Clifton, John, painter, last inside cover 

Dean, James E., marble works, 11 

Dubois, Charles, nursery, opp. 1(15 

Dubois, John, dry goods, 1 

Dennis, Geo. L., crockery, opp. 114 

Dudley, A. H., flour mill, bet. 129 & 130 

Disbrow & Goring, foundiy, opp. 138 

Dougliss, D. H., crockery," bet. 113 & 114 

Doughty, J. H., phvsician, 155 

Estabrook, Charles, books and stationery, opp. 146 

Eastman, H. G., Business College, 148 

Eagle, Daily and Weekly, newspaper, opp. 89 

Foster, E. B., photographs, opp. 105 

Farmun, M. L., druggist, 14 

Forshew & Co., music store, opp 122 

Franklin, D. R. & Son, hair dressers, bet. 129 & 130 

Gait, John, slate roofer, 13 

Glens Falls Insurance Company, bet. 129 & 130 

Glenham Store, dry Goods, groceries, etc., opp. 145 

Harris, Win G, painter, 1 

Hopper, James A., painter, opp. 138 

Hayt, P. B. & Co , clothing, bet, 121 & 122 

Harloe, ¥m., builder, opp. 113 

Hobbs, R., baker and confectioner, opp. 106 

Hine, R, D. & Son, furnishing goods, 155 

Hughson, Aug's, stoves, opp. 97 

HnbbeU, J. L. & Son, grocers, opp. 98 

Hatch, E. R., boots and shoes, bet. 97 & 98 
Hickok, J. H., book store, 1st inside cover & edge of last outside cover 

Jackson & Davis, carriage makers, 155 

Journal, Fishkill, newspaper, bet. 113 & 114 

Killey, E. B., printer, opp. 90 



10 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Lester, T. S. & H. M., clothing, 

Lawson & Co., J. T. clothing, 

Lockwood House, hotel, 

Luckey, Yail & Manceville, 

Machine Company, Fishkill Lauding, 

Millard & Bro., J*. P., freighters, 

McCullough, J. W , marble works, 

McKee, Samuel, carpenter & builder, 

Miller, J. W., carpets, &c, 

Membe r , J. E., grocer, 

Nelson & Co., furniture, 

Osborn, Oakley, roofer, 

Owen. Samuel, J. hardware, 

Peattie, James, grocer, 

Pope Brothers, photographs. 

Pacific Hotel, New York, 

Pepper, Elijah, saw mill, 

Peterkin, Mrs., millinery goods, 

Price, John A., planing, sawing and moulding mill, 

Rogers, D. C, stoves, 

Rogers, William H., stoves, 

Rosa, II. B., furniture, 

Rapp, M. book binder, 

Rouse, Phillip P., hotel, 

Remington. E. & Sou, pistols, 

Richards, Dr. E. A. physician, 

Storm, C. T. & Bro., dry goods, 

Smith, S. G. & J. T., dry goods and groceries, 

Schenck, Dr. J. P., Jr., physician and druggist, 

Scofield, E., miller. 

Sewell, S. & J., carriage makers, 

Smith Brothers, confectioners and saloon, 

Scofield, J. L. & Son, insurance agents & surveyors. 

Smith, Daniel, bookstore, 

Smith & Green, restaurant, 

Schoonmaker, Mills & Weller, dry goods. 

Slee Brothers, photographs, 

Smith & Stotesbury, grocers, 

Sloan, R. .1 , tailor, 

Smith, Anna & Marion, milliners, 

Spaight, J. W., sewing machines, 

Savings Hank. Mechanics', Fislikill Landing, 

Savings Institute Fislikill, 

Standard, Fislikill, newspaper, (illuminated colors), bet. 

Tompkins, S. & Son, grocers, 

Thomson, William, painter, 

Onion WTbeelbarrow Company, 

Wright, I). C. school. 

Ware A McCune, painters, 

Wiltsie, <i. Fred., harness, 

Wood & Co., J. (!., druggists, 



bet. 
bet. 



bet. 
bet 



bet. 



bet. 
bet. 



bet. 
bet. 



bet. 



bet 



bet 



PAGE. 
129 & 130 
129 & 130 
opp. 122 
2 
112 
129 & 130 
129 & 130 
opp. 114 



114 
136 
121 
113 



opp. 

opp. 

opp. 

129 & 131) 

155 

opp. 100 
145 & 14(5 
129 & 13U 

opp. 121 



opp. 
opp. 



121 
130 
154 
113 & 114 
opp. 105 
129 & 1311 
12 
opp. 113 
121 & 122 
128 

105 & km; 

opp. 130 



opp. 

opp. 
opp 
105 & 106 

opp. 122 



105 

W 
137 
10(5 



opp. 



1st outside cover and bet 



122 

154 

155 

last inside cover 

bet. 97 A- 98 

140 

142 <fc J 44 

149 & 150 

155 

op]). 122 

opp. 113 

145 & 146 

opp. L06 

opp. 129 

opp. 122 



J\£arble AVorrks, 

FISHKILL, DUTCHESS CO., N. Y. 



The subscriber would respectfully announce to all who may wish 
anything in his line, that he is prepared to furnish, on the most, rea* 
sonable terms, any article that may be required, 

FROM THE PLAINEST HEADSTONE TO THE 

Most Massive and Elaborate Monument. 

He has lately, at considerable expense, added to his facilities ma- 
chinery for rubbing and polishing marble, which not only does the 
work much more rapidly than the old system, but executes it in a far 
superior manner. 

He has now on hand, ready fitted up, the best assortment of 

CHILDEEN'S MONUMENTS 

ever offered in this vicinity. The 
a ttention of parties wishing to erect 

IVEONTTlVEiESlIXPI'S 

is invited to his collection of Designs, 
which embrace 

MANY NEW AND 
TASTY PATTERNS. 

Drawings and estimates furnished, when desired. All ki&ds of 
GRANITE and STONE WORK furnished to order. 




rhammial Jron ffifitorh, 



FENCES, VASES, URNS, POSTS, CHAIRS, SETTEES, <fcc, sup- 
plied at manufacturers' prices. 

PATTERNS KEPT FOR EXHIBITION. 

iSTCalls solicited. Orders by mail, or letters of inquiry, will re- 
ceive prompt attention. 



E. REMINGTON & SONS, 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

XT. JS. 




CARBINES, 

AKMY, 

KAVY 

AND 

Also a great variety of 

Pocket sizes, for both loose & fixed 

AMMUNITION; 

Gun Barrels, Locks, Mountings, 



JOHN GALT, 

WGKDH.B8M.is silmtb sbmbiBs 

AND 

PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL 

©late Roofer, 




SOLE AGENT for the following Companies : 
EAGLE SLATE CO., Vermont. 
LEHIGH SLATE CO., Pennsylvania. 
CHAPMAN SLATE CO., 
NEW YORK SLATE CO., NEW YORK. 

SLATE FURNISHED and WORK DONE in any 
Part of the United States. 



ID E IP O T S : 

47 Main St., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 0. NEEF, Agent. 

Cor. 10th Av. & W. 12th St., New York City. ADAM PONTON, " 
Terrace Square, Buffalo, N. Y. W. J. ROBERTS, " 

Cor. Washington & Franklin Sts., Chicago, 111. J. PARKER, 



GENERAL OFFICE, 



®A1 I*, f 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

A1?J> DEALER IK 

Paints, Oils, Glass, Dye Stuffs, 
297 MAIN STEEET, Pu'KEEPSIE, N. Y. 



Invites the attention of the public to his stock comprising: 

Alcohol, Cream Tartar, Madder, 

Allium, Castile Soap, Nutmegs, 

Agoles, Cochineal, Cinnamon, 

Arrow Knot, Carb Ammonia, Prussiate Potash. 

Burning Fluid, Cudbear, Pearlash, 

Bath Crick, Cloves, Pepper, 

Hi-Carh. Soda, Epsom Salts, Potash. 

Blue Vitrol, Fr. and Am. Glass, Paper, 

Brimstone, Ginger, Twines, 

British Lustre, Glue, Saleratus, 

Borax, Hops, Sal Soda, 

Bi-Chro Potash. Indigo, Rotten Stone, 

Copperas. Lae Dye- Writing Ink. 

Acids— Commercial and Chemically Pure. Best Brands of Pure 
Lemon-Colored Kerosene Oil constantly on hand. 
PAINTS. 

White Lead, pure, Venetian Red, ParisGreen, 

American Zinc, Chrome Yellow, Prussian Blue, 

Belgium Zinc, Chrome Green, Litharge, 

French Zinc, Van Dyke Brown. Bed Lead, 

French Yellow, Umber, Sienna, 

(►range Mineral. Vermilion. Verdigris. 

OILS, ETC. 
Linseed Oil, Olive Oil, Rosin Oil, 

Boiled Oil, Lard Oil, Camphene, 

Sperm Oil, Wats Foot Oil, Turpentine, Spirit, 

Whale Oil. Rape Seed Oil. Varnishes, etc. 

With a lull assortment of selected powdered Drugs, Herbs, Brushes 
and Fancy Articles. Ointment, Tinctures and Syrups, prepared from 
the formula of the United States Dispensatory. 

Particular attention paid to Physicians' Prescriptions. 

All orders intrusted to the subscriber will be promptly attended to. 

MORGAN I-. FARXCM. 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 

OF THE 

Tin" @ff F life Mil 

BY T. VAN WVCK BRINKEKHOFF. 



To present anything more than a brief sketch or outline of some 
prominent historic incidents connected with the Town of Fishkill, is 
all that will he attempted in this article, designed to accompany the 
forthcoming new and first Directory of the Town. 

That such a work, in a town containing, it is true, large and flourish- 
ing manufacturing interests, beautiful and thriving villages; but 
nevertheless all of them so disconnected from each other, should al- 
ready have received so large and liberal a subscription in advance of 
its publication, speaks well for the public spirit and enterprise of its 
inhabitants. 

The Town of Fishkill embraces within its present boundaries, the 
south western portion of Dutchess county. The Hudson River Hows 
along its western side, and the County of Putnam bounds its southern 
boarders. It is situated sixty miles due north from Xew York City. 
The Hudson River and the Hudson River Railroad both afford easy 
and speedy access to the commerical emporium of the whole country. 
The Boston, Hartford and Erie Railroad will soon, it is believed, pass 
through the Town, having its most important depot at its connection 
with the Hudson River Railroad, on the east shore of the river. For 
beauty of scenery, salubrity of climate, fertility of soil, richness and 
productiveness of its farms and manufactories, it may not be deemed 
invidious to say that it is unsurpassed, if indeed equaled, by any other 
section of the country, however favored. Pleasure seekers have been 
charmed with its mountains and vallies. Invalids have breathed 
its pure mountain air, and been refreshed with a new life. No pesti- 
lential nor noxious diseases infest its boarders. The character too and 
enterprise of its inhabitants are justly deserving of consideration. — 
For it may be borne in mind that whatever natural advantages any 



»1 HI8T0RY OF FISHKILL. 



country may possess, the men make the country and not the country 
the men. 

The early history of the Town of Fishkill is connected with the 
general history of the county, and can only he reached by resolving 
some of the changes which it has undergone. This is in fact its his- 
tory. 

Its histoiy anterior to 1682 belongs to the red men of the country. 
There is no positive knowledge that up to this time any white man 
had ever set foot upon its soil. 

Before passing to notice the early history of the Town itinay be 
well to remark that this section had been the favorite home of the red 
men, probably for ages. 

This, too, more than any other spot, was the home of their Priests. 
Here they performed their incantations and ministered at their Altars. 
Mr. Broadhead thus alludes to them in his history of New York : "It 
would seem that the neighboring Indians esteemed the peltries of the 
Fishkill as charmed by the incantations of the aboriginal enchanters 
who lived along its banks, and the beautiful scenery in which those 
ancient Priests of the Highlands dwelt is thus invested Avith new 
poetic associations." Dunlap, in his history of New York, speaks of 
them as occupying the Highlands, called by them Kittatenny Moun- 
tains. Their principal settlement, designated Wiccapee, was situated 
in the vicinity of Antony's Nose. Here, too, lived the Wappingers, a 
warlike and brave tribe, extending themselves along the Matteawan, 
along the Wappingers Kill and tributaries, along the Hudson, and to the 
northward crossed the river into Ulster comity. These and other tribes 
to the south, west and north were parts of and tributaries to the great 
Iroquois Confederation — the marvel for all time to come of a system 
of government so wise and politic, and for men so eloquent and dar- 
ing. The Wappingers took part in the Dutch and Indian Wars of 
1643 and 166:5, led on by their war chiefs, Wapperonk and A.cpjen. 

A few indian names are still remaining, and a few traces of their 
history still left standing. The name Matteawan is indian. It is the 
indian name of the stream, signifying "Good Beaver Ground." 

The name Wappinger still tells of the lords that once owned the 
soil along the Hudson. The indian name of the stream, however, was 
Mawanassigh or Mawenawasigh. Wiccapee and Shenondoah are in- 
dian names of places in Fishkill Hook and East Fishkill. Apoquague, 
now denoting a country Post Office, was then the indian name of what 
is now called Silver Lake. The meaning in indian signifying "The 
Round Pond." 

In Fishkill Hook, until quite recently, there were traces of their 



HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 52 



burial grounds, and many apple and pear trees are still left standing, 
set there by the hands of the red man before the country had been oc- 
cupied by Europeans. 

In closing this part of our subject, we subjoin a deposition made by 
David Nimham, a Wappinger indian, touching boundaries of tribes, &c. 



Davih Ximham, aged thirty-six years, being duly sworn, maketh 
oath, that he is a river indian, of the tribe of the Wappingers, which 
tribe were the ancient inhabitants of the east shore of Hudson's 
River, from the City of New York to about the middle of Beekman's 
Patent ; that another of river indians, called Mahiccondas, were the 
ancient inhabitants of the remaining east shore of the said river : that 
these two tribes constituted one nation. That the deponent well un- 
derstands the language of the Mahiccondas. It is very little differ- 
ent from the language of the Wappingo tribe. That the indian word 
Pattenock signifies in the language of the Mahiccondas, a fall of wa- 
ter, and has no other signification. And this deponent says that he 
is a Christian, and has resided some years with the Mahiccondas at 
Stockridge. 

His 
DAVID H XTMHAM. 

Mark. 

Sworn the second day of August, 1762, before me. 
William Smith. 



Having thus noticed briefly the indian history of the town, we now 
proceed to notice the patent and subsequent settlement. 

The first purchase of laud in the County of Dutchess was made in 
the town of Fishkill. On the 8th day of February, 1682, a license was 
given by Thomas Dongan, Commander in Chief of the Province of 
New York, to Francis Rombout and Gulian Yer Planck, to purchase 
a tract of laud from the indians. Under this license they bought ou 
the 8th day of August, 1683, of the Wappinger indians all their right, 
title and interest to a certain large tract of land, afterward known as 
the Rombout Precinct. Gulian Yer Planck died before the English Pat- 
ent was issued by Gov. Dongan. Stephauus Van Cortland was then 
joined in it with Rombout, and Jacobus Kipp substituted as the rep- 
resentative of the children of Gulian Yer Planck. On the 17th day of 
October, 1685, letters patent, under the broad seal of the Province of 
New York, were granted by King James the Second, and the parties 



53 II/STORY OF FISHEILL. 



to whom these letters patent were granted, became from that time 
the undisputed proprietors of the soil. There were 76,1100 acres of 
these lands lying in Fishkill and other towns taken from the patent, 
and 9,000 acres lying in the limits of the town of Poughkeepsie. 
Besides paying the natives, as a farther consideration for the privilege 
of their license, they were to pay the Commander in Chief, Thomas 
Dongan, six bushels of good and merchantable winter wheat every 
year. 

We an- happy in being able to present the subscribers to the Direc- 
tory, with a copy of the original indian deed of the town. It has ne^ er 
before been published, and may well deserve their attention. "We are 
inbedted to Wm. K. Admsgton, of the State Treasury Department, 
for a copy of this old deed. Mr. Addinuton obtained it by persisting 
in his search for it, after repeated failures. 



BOOK OF PATENTS, VOL. 5, PAGE ?'2. 

The following Indian Deed of Sale. Recorded for Air. ffrancis Rom- 
bout and Gulyne Ver Planke, the 14th day of August, 1683: 

To all CHRISTIAN PEOPLE TO WHOM this Present AVriteixo 
shall Come, SackoraghMgh for himselfe, and in the name of Meg- 
riesken, Sachem of the Wappinger Indians, Queghsjehapaein, Niess- 
jawejahos, Queghout, Asotews, Wappegereck, Nathindaeniw, Wap- 
pappee, Ketaghkainis, Meakhaghoghkan, Mierham, Peapightapeieuw, 
Queghitaeuw, Minesawogh, CaCariogh, Kightapiuhogh, Rearowogh, 
Meggrek, Sejay, Wienangeck, Maenemanew, and Ginghstyerem, true 
and Lawful Owners and Indian Proprietors of the Land herein Men- 
ehoned, send Greeting, KNOW YEL — that tor and in Consideracon of 
a Certain Sumc or Quantity of Money, Wampum, and diverse other 
Goods in a Schedull hereunto Annexed Perticularly Menconed and 
Expered to them the said Indians, in Hand Payed by Mr. ffrancis 
Rumbouts and Gulyne Ver Planke, both of the Citty of New York, 
Merchants, the Receipt whereof they, the said Indians. Doc hereby 
Acknowledge, and therewith ownes themselves to be fully payed, 
Contented and Sattisfied, and thereof and of every Parte and Parcel! 
Doe hereby A.cquitt, Exonerate and Discharge them, the said ffrancis 
Rumbouts and Gulyne V. Planke, their Beires and A.ssignes, have 
Given, Granted, Bargained, Sold, Aliened, Enfeoffd, and Continued, 
and by these Presents Doe fully Cleerly and Absolutely Give, Grant, 
Bargaine, Sell, and Alien, Enfeoffe, and Continue unto the said ffran- 
cis Rumbout and Gulyne Ver Planke, All that Tract or Parcell of 
Land Scituate, Lyeing and being on the Last side of Eudson's River, 



HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 54 



at the north side of the High Lands, Begining from the South side of 
A Creek Called the fresh Kill, and by the Indians Matteawan, and 
from thence Northward along said Hudson's River five hund d Kodd 
bejond the Great Wappins Kill, Called by the Indians Mawenawasigh, 
being the Northerly Bounds, and from thence into the Woods fouer 
Houers goeing, al wares Keeping five hund d Kodd Distant from the 
North side of said Wapinges Creeke, however it Rutins, as alsoe from 
the said fresh Kill or Creeke called Matteawan. along the said fresh 
Creeke into the Woods att the foot of the said High Hills, including 
all the Reed or Low Lands at the South side of said Creeke, with an 
Easterly Line fouer Houers going into the Woods, and from thence 
Northerly to the end of the fouer Houers Goeing or Line Drawne att 
the North side of the five hund d Rodd Bejoyond the Greate Wap- 
pinger Creek or Kill called Mawenawasigh, together with all the Lands, 
Soyles, Meadows, both fresh and Salt Pastures, Commons, Wood, Land, 
Marshes, Rivers, Rivoletts, Streams, Creekes, Waters, Lakes, and 
whatsoever else to the said Tract or Parcell of Land within the Bounds 
and Limitts aforesaid is Belonging, or any wise Appurteining, with- 
out any Reservacon of Herbage, Trees, or any other thing Growing 
or Being thereupon, To have and to hold the said Tract or Parcell of 
Laud, Meadow, Ground, and Primisses, with their and every of their 
Appurtennces, and all the Estate, Right, Title, Interest, Clayme and 
Demand of them the said Indian Proprietors, and each and every of 
them, of, in, and to. the same, and Every Parte thereof, unto them the 
said fi'rancis Rumbout and Gulyne Yer Planke, their Heires and As- 
signes, to the Sole and only Proper use, Benefitt and Behoofe of them, 
the said ffrancis Rumbout and Gulyne Ver Planke, their Heires and 
Assignes for Ever, And they the said Indians Doe for themselves and 
their Heires and every of them Covenant, Promise, and Engage that 
the said fi'rancis Rumbout and Gulyne Yer Planke, their Heires and 
Assignes, shall and may from henceforth forever Lawfully, Peace- 
ably, and Quettly have, hold, Possesse, and Enjoye the said Tract or 
Parcell of Land, and all and Singuler other the Primisses, with their 
Appertences without any Lett, Hindrance, or Interrupcon whatsoever 
of or by them, the said Indians, Proprieters or their Heires, or of any 
other Person or Persons whatsoever clayming or that hereafter shall 
or may Clayme, by, from, or under them, or Either of them, And that 
they shall and will, upon the reasonable Request and Demand made 
by the said Francis Rumbouts and Gulyne Yer Planke, Give and De- 
liver Peaceably and Quiettly Possession of the said Tract or Parcell of 
Land and Primisses, or of some Parte thereof, for and in the Name of 
the whole, unto such Person or Persons as by the said ffrancis Rum- 



55 



HISTORY OF FIPHKILL. 



bout and Gulyne Ver Planke, shall be Appointed to Receive the same. 
In Witnesse whereof, the said Sackoraghkigh, for himselfe and in the 
Xanie of Megriskar, Sachem of Wappinger Indians, Queghsjehapeieuw, 
Niessjawejhos, Queghout, Asotewes, "Wappegereck, Xathindaew, 
"Wappape, Ketaghkanns, Meakaghoghkan, Mierham, Peapightapaeuw, 
Queghhitaemv, Memesawogh, Katariogh, Kightapinkog, Rearawogh, 
Meggieeh, Sejay, "Wienangeck, Maenemaeuw, Guighstierm, the Indian 
Owners and Proprietors afores d , have hereunto sett their Hands and 
Scales in X. Yorke, the Eighth Pay of August, in the 35th Yeare of 
his Ma ties Reigne, Anno Pom, 1683. 



The marke of } 
The marke of X 
Signed Sealed and Pelivered 
in the psen of us 
Antho : Prockiiolls, 
p. y. courtlandt, 
John "West. 

The marke of CLAES the Indian 



SAKORAGHPCK, [L.S.] 
QUEGHSJEHAPAEIW, [L.S.] 



X Inter. [verite.] 



MERHAM, [L.S.] 
PEAPIGHTAPAEW, [L.S.] 
QUEGHHITAEM"W, [L.S.] 
.MIOIXESAT70GH, [l.s.] 
KOTARIOGH, [L.S.] 
KIGHTAPINKOJH, [L.S.] 
REAROWOGII, [L.S.] 
MEGGEXKSE.TAY, [l.s.] 
"WIEXARGECK, [L.S.] 
MAEXEMAXEW, [LA] 
GTJIGHSTJEREM, [l.s.] 
KETAGMKAXXES. [L.S.] 
MEAKI1A.1H, [L.s.] 
OiillKAX, [L.S.] 
XIESS.JAWEJAHOS, [l.s.] 
QTJEJHOUT, [1.8.] 
SJOTEWES, [LA] 
WAPPEGERECK, [L.S.) 
XATIIIXDAEl'W, (l.s.) 
WAIT APE, (L.S.) 

A BcheduU or Perticuler of Money, "Wampum and oilier goods Paid 
by ll'rancis Rumbout and Gulyne Ver Planke for the purchase of the 
Land in the Peed hereunto annexed. 



The marke of 


a 


The marke of 


& 


The marke of 


7 


The marke of 


8 


The marke of 





The marke of 





The marke of 


w 


The marke of 


9 


The marke of 


o 


The marke of 





The marke of 


2 


The marke of 


(- 


The marke of 


V 


The marke of 





The marke of 


X 


The marke of 


X 


The marke of 


X 


The marke of 


X 


The marke of 


X 


The marke of 


X 



HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 



56 



One him 4 Royalls, 

One hun d Pound Powder, 

Two bun 4 fathom of White Wampum, 

one hund Barrs of Lead, 

One hundred fathom of black Wampum, 

thirty tobacco boxes ten holl adges, 

thirty Gunns, twenty Blankets, 

forty fathom of Dumlls. 

twenty fathom of stroudwater Cloth. 

thirty Kittles, forty Hatchets. 

forty Homes, forty Shirts. 

forty p stockins, twelve coates of R. B. & b. C. 

ten Drawing Knives. 

forty earthen Juggs. 

forty Bottles. 

forty Knives, fouer ankers rum. 

ten halfe, fatts Beere. 

two hund d tobacco Pipes, &c~ 

Eighty Pound Tobacco. 

New York, August the 8th, 1683. 
The above Perticulers were Delvered to the Indians in the Bill of 
Sale Menconed in the psenee of us 

Antho : Brockhalls, 
p. y. courtlakdt, 
John West. 

I do hereby certify the aforegoing to be a true copy of the Original 
Record, compared therewith by me. 

Lewis A. Scott, Secretary. 

Having thus given the boundaries of the Rombout Patent, we will 
next notice the original dimensions of the County of Dutchess, and of 
the sub-divisions. 

Dutchess was one of the original ten counties formed in 1683. By 
act of the Legislature, its boundaries are thus defined in the third year 
of the reign of William and Mary, 1691. "The Dutchess County to 
be from the bounds of the County of Westchester on the south side of 
the Highlands, along the east side of Hudson's River, as far as Roe- 
loffe Jansen's Creek, and eastward into the woods twelve miles." — 
Roeloffe Jansen's creek was situated near the centre of our neighbor- 
ing county of Columbia. It will thus be observed that the Patent was 



O < HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 

too wide for the county. By farther act of the Legislature passed in 
the reign of William the Third, on the 18th day of October, 1701, 
Dutchess County was annexed to Ulster for the term of seven years. 
Provision being made "for the freeholders in Dutchess County, to give 
their votes in the County of Ulster, us if they actually lived in said 
county." In the twelfth year of the reign of Queen Ann, on the 23d 
day of October, 17J5, an act was passed "for Dutchess County to elect 
a Supervisor, a Treasurer, Asessors and Collectors." Up to this time 
no election had been held in Dutchess County. This arrangement 
continued in force until 1719, when the county was divided into three 
Districts or "Wards, called the Middle, Northern, and Southern Wards, 
with power to choose a Supervisor in each. After 1737 these wards 
were again sub-divided into seven precincts, with power to elect a 
Supervisor and Town Officers in each, and this provision was coupled 
with the act, "That the wages of each Supervisor shall not exceed 
three shillings for each day." It will already have been noticed that 
the Patentees came in full possession of their purchase in the Fall of 
1685. Possession and occupancy do not always join hands in new- 
purchases. Several years must therefore have elapsed before any 
real settlement was made on the Patent. In fact twenty -five years 
after, in 1710, there were but very few families located on the Patent. 
Not certainly to exceed a dozen. 

No positive dates of occupancy can lie determined from authentic 
records before 1708; and the reason why, is that up to this time on 
account of minor children no title could have been given. In 17(18, 
however, a partition by writ of the Supreme Court was made of all the 
lands between the Fishkill and Wappinger's Creek ; the rest, north 
and south of these streams, remaining in common. "We are left there- 
fore to conjecture a little as to the time of first actual settlement ; but 
will avoid this by stating undoubted facts and leave this privilege to 
others. 

On the Tenth of January, 1709, ROGER BEETT and CatheBNE, his 
wife, gave their joint bond to Captain GYLOB Shelly, of New York 
City, for the sum of three hundred ninety-nine pounds and six shil- 
lings. This bond soon falling due, and not having been paid, on the 
3rd day of June, 1713, they gave a mortgage deed to Robert Watts 
and ROBERT Surting, executors of Gylob Shelly, covering all their 
part of the division between the two streams. Their allotment, being 
the southerinost part, or the part covering mainly the Fishkill settle- 
ment. "Excepting and reserving always out of the said premises, one 
tenement, grist-mill and watercourse thereunto belonging, together 
with 300 acres of land adjoining the saiil mill, now or late in possession 



HISTORY OF FISITKILL 58 



of said Roger Brett, or his assigns, and also, 150 acres now or late in 
possession of John Terboss ; loo acres of snch land, now or of late 
in possession of John Buys ; 100 acres of said land now or late in pos- 
session of Casper Prime; 80 acres of said land, now or late in pos- 
session of Peter De boys ; 60 acres of said land, now or late in pos- 
session of Yowreb Springstead. Also, five thousand acres lying and 
being in any part of the hereby reserved premises." 

And inasmuch as these are the only persons named in the Mort- 
gage Deed ; the inference is that few, if any others, were occupying 
lauds on the Patent. Having therefore this basis of facts, the reader 
can tell as well as any one, when the first settlement teas made. The 
money loaned by Roger Brett and his wife'was no doubt used by 
them iu erecting a house and building a grist-mill the following year. 

This enterprise deserves a passing notice. A grist-mill now has no 
very especial features of interest. It would have great charms now 
if we were depending solely upon one single mill for our daily bread. 
How different then must have been the grist-mill to the new settle- 
ment. It highly commends the enterprise and liberality of the paten- 
tee that he should so soon make provision for the wants of the young 
and weak community. It was the first mill built in Dutchess County, 
and for a long time Orange county paid tribute to Madame Brett's 
Mill, for by this name it was known, tar and wide over the country. 
Roads terminated there, "From Wiccopee to Madame Brett's Mill." 
"From Hackensak to Madame Brett's Mill." A few years since an old 
gentleman in Orange County stated this circumstance : 

His Grand Father had told him when he was a boy how he used to 
go to Madame Brett's Mill. That was then the only Mill to wfiieh 
they had access. The neighbors and settlers for miles would come 
witli a bag of grain fastened securely upon the back of a horse. When 
they had all arrived, the horses were tied to each other's tails, and 
mounting the foremost one he wended his way to the river. With au 
indian canoe he would cany over the grain and when ground return 
home again i.i the same manner. 

We pass now from the first grist-mill of the town to the first freight- 
ing partnership established in the Town. Though the contract is 
somewhat lengthy, yet probably satisfactory nevertheless to many, 
we will insert it in full. There seems properly to be a connection be- 
tween milling and freighting, and on that account we mention it here. 

TO ALL CHRISTIAN PEOPLE to whom this present writing 
shall or may concern: Jacobus Terbos of Rhomhout's Precinct, in 



59 HISTORY OF FISH KILL. 



Dutchess Co., and Province of New York, yeoman ; Cornelius Van 
Wyek of same place, yeoman: James Duncan of the same place, mer- 
chant; John Brinckerhoff of the same place, yeoman ; Isaac Brinck- 
hofFof the same place, yeoman; Catherine Brett, of the same place, 
vriddow; Theodore Van Wyek of the same place, yeoman; John 
Carman of the same place, yeoman; Jacob Brinckerhoff of the same 
place, yeoman ; Cornelius Wiltsie of the same place, yeoman ; John 
Carman of the same place, yeoman; Abraham Bloom of the same 
place, yeoman ; Benjamin Easbrookof the same place, yeoman ; Theo- 
dore Van Wyck, junior, of the same place, yeoman ; George Adrianee 
of the same place, yeoman ; Abraham Adrianee of the same place, 
yeoman; Thomas Storm of Westchester County and province afore- 
said, yeoman; Lawrence Losee of Rhombouts Precinct in Dutchess 
County, and province aforesaid, yeoman ; Joshua Carman of the same 
place, yeoman ; John Van Vlanckeran of the same place, blacksmith, 
SIONI) GREETING:, Whereas the several and respective persons 
herein above mentioned do for them and each of them severally, and 
for each of their several and respective heirs and executors, admini- 
strators and assigns, agree to and with each other to stand and abide 
by What is written in following manner and form, viz: Whereas the 
persons above mentioned have lately bought a lot of land of Francis 
Brett, in Rhombout Precinct, in County and Province above said, 
which said laud binds on the north river and said Brett's land, com- 
monly called Willet's Landing, containing about eleven acres one 
quarter and nine square rods, according to survey, be it more or less, 
and Whereas the several persons first above named have purchased 
the same, these presents WITNESS that we, the partners first 
above mentioned, whose bands and seals are hereunto set. do hereby 
fully, freely and unanimously agree with each other to have a large 

store house built, with a dwelling house adjoining, or near the same, 
and lor the speedy carving the said building on, we do hereby unani- 
mously agree that it shall be decided by the majority of the said part- 
ners, according to their several rights, that is he that has two shares 
shall have the privilege of two votes ; he that hath one share one vote, 
and they to whom a share is divided shall lie obliged to join their 
votes together as but one vote. 

Lor the true performance, they bind themselves, each of their heirs, 
i xecutors and assigns, in the penalty of 40 pounds. 

/// witness wliereof, the partners above named have interchangeably 
set their hand and seals, this day of February in the sixteenth year of 
his Majesties reign, 1742. 



HISTORY OF FISHKILL. GO 



Jacobus Terbos, [l.s.] John Carman, [l.s.] 

Cornelius Van Wyck, [l.s.] Abraham Bloom, [l.s.] 

James Duncan, [l.s.] Benjamin Hasbrook, [l.s.] 

John Brinckerhoff, [l.s.] Theodoras Van Wyck, jr. [ l.s. ] 

Isaac Brinckerhotf, [l.s.] Jores Adriance, [l.s.] 

Thomas Storms, [l.s.] Jan Van Vleekeren, [l.s.] 

Theodoras Van Wyck, [l.s.] Josha Carman, [l.s.] 

Jacob Briukerhoff, [l.s.] Abraham Adriance, [l.s.] 

Cornelius Willsie, [l.s.] Larns. Losee, [l.s.] 
Sealed and delivered in 
presence of 

John Wright, 

Jonathan Langdon. 

We presume this to be the first organized freighting establishment 
in the county. 

We have before spoken of the difficulty of obtaining actual data 
prior to tiic period of 1708, during the twenty-three years immediately 
following the purchase of the soil. 

This same difficulty continued in force on the Ver Planck portion of 
the division until M22, on account of minor children, when it was 
again divided. One third of the Ver Planck portion was apportioned 
to Andrew Teller, sou and only child of Henrietta Verplanck, and was 
sold by his executors about 1740. Settlement therefore was begun on 
the Verplnnek portion of the division subsequent to the Kombout and 
Van Courtland sections. To throw some additional light upon this 
period, we submit a few further Legislative enactments in reference to 
Dutchess County. In 1687 the Governor and Council levied a tax of 
a halfpenny on every pound out of the estates of the freeholders of 
Dutchess County. On the 10th day of September, 1692, passed a fur- 
ther act, " To raise 80 men out of Dutchess and Ulster to protect Al- 
bany from indians duringthe winter. "In 1713, "Empowered Dutchess 
Co. to elect a Supervisor, Assessor, and Collector;" and in 1717 gave 
Dutchess County the privilege of erecting a county-house and prison. 
The manor of Livingston was then detached from Dutchess, and 
joined to Albany. 

Previous to 1718 there were no records kept in Dutchess County. — 
Whatever records may have been kept prior to this time have been 
lost, and we have been unable in Ulster County records to find any- 
thing 'covering this period. 

If we assume that settlement commenced in the town as early as 



(il 



KJSfORi' OF FISHKILL. 



1695, then it is now over 170 years ago. The Cities of Xewburirh and 
Poughkeepsie together contain now more of a population than the 
whole State of Xew York did then. One of the first instruments on 
record in the county is dated on the 26th day of December, 1718. 

This was a conveyance by Nicholas Van DerBogart for the purpose, 
as the record states, "to build and maintain a proper meeting-house 
to worship the one and only God, according to the tenets and methods 
as it is concluded by the Synod National kept at Dordrecht in 161* 
and '19, and that in the nedder Dutch lingo, as it is now used by the 
classis of Amsterdam." A few deeds on record date back to 1704. — 
There is also a receipt from Abraham Buys of:? pounds, J<> shillings, 
and 2 pence, "pursuant to an act of the general assembly to promote 
trade with the indians, and for securing the Six Nations in his Ma- 
jesty's service.'' There is also an account of some bounties. "To 
Krickes the Indian, for a wolfs head." Another to Simon Coole, and 
yet another to Capt. Barnard Van Cleek, "for a wolf killed by Per- 
cemmin the Indian." 

In 1714 Dutchess County contained a population of 44.">. There 
were 67 heads of families at the time when the census was taken, (hi 
accounl of the fewness of their number we herewith subjoin a list of 
their names. They richly deserve a place, for they were the pioneers 
of this section of the country ,and throughout the adjacent settlements : 



Jacob Kip. 
Jacob Plowgh, 
Marticis Sleght, 
Andreis Dairedes, 
Peter Palmater, 
Roger Brett, 
Hendrick Pells, 
John Hranes. 
Elena Van DeBogart, 
v attic Kool, 
Halt us Van Kleeck, 
Jacob Hoghtelingh, 
John Ostrom, 
Jacob Vosburgh, 
Johanes Van Kleeck. 
Roeliff Dhytser, 
Henry Van Der Burgh, 
Abraham Van Dusen, 
Catrine La-ink Nedo, 



Carret Van A'lcir. 
William < lutcn. 
Frans De Langen, 
.lames llusey. 
William Tetsort, 
[saac Bendricks, 
John Kip, 
Peck DeWit, 
John De Grase, 
Bartholems Boogenboom, 
Johanus Dyckman, Sienjer, 
Barent Van Kleeck. 
Willem Schot, 
Meindert Van Den Bogart, 
llendcrick Bidsiert, 
Swart Van Wagenen, 

\hraham Vosburgh, 
Thomas Sanders, 
Lourens KJoicerbacker, 



HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 62 



Acndcris Gerdener, Hendcrk Sissum, 

Mellen Springsteen. John Buys, 

Johnes Terbots, Evert Van Wagenen, 

Abraham Buys, Whilliam Ostrander, 

Lawrans Ostrout, Harmen Binders, 

Aret Masteu, Tunis Pieterse, 

Maghell Pall mater, Lenar Le Roy, 

Peter Be Boyes, Johannis Spoor, Juujoor, 

Peter Vely, Elias Van Bunchoten, 

Jeurey Sprinsten, Willem Wijt, 

Adan Yan Alsted, Peter Lasink, 

Leonard Lewis, ey Scouten, 

Harmen Knickerbacker, Gysbert Oosterhout, 
Frans LeRoy, Johannis Dyckman, Junjor. 

Dirck Wesselse, 
The first tax book bears date Jan. 17th, 1717. The amount of prop- 
erty liable to taxation in the North Ward was £426, upon which there 
was a tax levied of £19, 19s, 4M; in the Middle Ward the property 
taxed amounted to £554, the tax levied £33, 9s, 6i& In the South 
Ward, the property taxed £320, the tax levied £19, 6s, Id. 

in 1723 there were one hundred and ninety-five taxable inhabitants 
in the county. Of these 47 were taxable in the South Ward. At this 
time quite a number of new names are introduced. Among them are 
the Mousiers, Lassinks, Lownsberrys, Sehoutens, Walderns, Binges, 
<fcc. The whole amount of property liable to taxation amounted to 
£543, and the tax levied amounted to £27, 3.s\ 

In this year Jacobus Swartwout was elected Supervisor ; Peter Du- 
bois and Thomas Ter Boos, Assessors; John Be Larger and Jacob 
Ter boos, Overseers of King's Highway; John Buys and Garret Van 
Vleit, Overseers of Fences. 

In the Colonial General Assembly the South Ward at this time was 
represented by Johannis Terbosch. He was first elected ii 716, and 
continued in office until 1723. Leonard Lewis had before this been 
elected to fill the same position, in 1713, but resided in the Middle 
Ward. Previous to this, members from Ulster had represented 
Dutchess, Henry Beekmau, Jacob Ruston and others. Members to 
the Colonial General Assembly then received six shillings a day for 
their services. Supervisors, however, were not so liberally paid.— 
They received less compensation, but were like other Legislative 
bodies, disposed to allow other necessary expenses, as for instance, 
"To Trynte Van Kleeck, widow, for victualling the assessors and 



63 



HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 



supervisors, justices and clerk, sider, shugar and candles 13s, 9</." "To 
Col. Leonard Lewis for two gallons of nun for assessors and supervi- 
sors. 9,s'," &G. 

It is a relief often times to see things with the eye rather than to 
wade through long chapters of dull history. There is this advantage, 
too, attending it, that we catch with the eye at once what we other- 
wise might not perceive. We submit therefore to the reader a view 
of the City of Poughkeepsie, in 1736. The change will readily be 
noticed; but the same change to a greater or less extent, not only 
pervades other parts of the county, but all over the land. Schenec- 
tady then lay upon the outer borders of civilization, and deep forests 
lav beyond and closed in around the river settlements. 




ti i) 



o N 



E K 



The reader will notice the Dutch Church, standing conspicuously 
upon the rising ground, and the dozen houses scattered along the 



HISTORY OF FISHEILL. f>4- 



sloping hill-side between there and the river. On to the north, if the 
map were extended, he would notice near the river, the residence of 
Baltus Van Kleak, near the mouth of a stream called Fish Creek 
or Cruyn Blboogh. Directly east of Baltus was the residence of 
John Edwards, and farther up the stream two other houses without 
designated owners. Out upon the Wappinger, directly east, and stand- 
ing solitary and alone, was the house of John Allins. The Xine 
Partner tract lay out beyond this, sub-divided into tracts without an 
occupant, or but one or two at most. Such in brief is an outline given 
by this old Map of 1736, of this uow populous and beautiful section 
of our county. 

We had hoped also in this connection to have given a Map of the 
village of Fishkill, of the same period. The Map has been mislaid. It 
would have made much poorer show upon paper than the shire town 
of the county does. There would not have been enough of it to have 
made it a neighborly farming community. 

The forty-seven taxable inhabitants in 1723 had increased to 71 in 
1730, thus showing an increase of 24 in seven years. 

JACOBUS DE PYSTER was their Supervisor. 

.loir annas Ter Boss, Jacobus Swartwout, Assessors. 

John Brinckerhoff, Clerk. 

Francis Drake, Surveyor of King's Highway, through Highlands. 

John ScnouTEN, Surveyor along the road from Wappingers to 
Madame Brett's Mill. 

Cornelius Bogardus, Surveyor of Madame Brett's Bridge. 

The period of 1740 was one of much progress and improvement. — 
The population increased more rapidly than at any prior time. There 
are several places still standing which date back to about this time. 
The old house of brick and stone near the mouth of the creek, former- 
ly or now owned by the Xewlins, was built by Madame Brett in 1740, 
as the date cut in the wall shows. Part of the homestead house of 
the Yer Pkncks, on the river, was built a little before 1740. The resi- 
dence of Hon. Isaac Teller, dates back to nearly the same period. 
The names attached to the following petition will give a better idea 
of the accession to the population and who composed it. The peti- 
tion states : 



" WE WHOSE NAMES are hereunto subscribed, being freeholders 
and inhabitants, have agreed and consented that the highway that 
used to run from "Wecapee along the south side of the Fishkill, should be 



• 



65 



HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 



altered and turned oyer said Fishkill at east end of Judge Ter Bushes' 
land, in the county road leading along the north side of the Fishkill." 
The petition having reference to the present Hook road, in front of 
llathew Brinkerhoffs. Petitioning to change it from passing on the 
south side of the creek to the north side. The petition further stairs. 
"That we are fully of opinnion that the altering and turning of said 
road again beyond the new bridge, along the south side of the said 
Fishkill, proceeds from a private view of malice to keep up party con- 
tention and division among the neighbors and to damage some par- 
ticular persons, thau from any real intention to serve anybody either 
private or public, and this we freely and sincerely declare, in Dutchess 
Co., Aug. ye first, 17:59." 

Johanis Brevort, 
Acndris Schenten, 



Jacobus Swarwout, 

His 

John y, Schouten, 

Mark, 

Symon Schouten, 
Johannis "Wiltsie, 

His 

Johanes M Sorin, 

Mark. 

His 

Jarry W Schouten, 

" Mark. 

Garret Nooststrand, 
Peter Monfoort, 
Phillip Smith, 
William Drake, 
lleiieriek Rosecrans, 
Theod. Van \\ yck, 
Samuel Hallsted, 
Stephen Ladoae, 
John Montross, 
Jan Van Ylcckeren. 
Francis Brett, 

tils 

Johannis H Middowe 

Mark. 

Masten Schenck, 
George Brinckerhoff, 
Jacob Brinckerhofl', 
Robert Brett, 

hts 

William W Leston, 

Mark. 

» lhamas Bauve, 



Wikham I'.roriwn, 
AYm. Ver Planck, 
Benjamin Roe, 
Henderick Van Tossell, 
Willem Suchat, 
Tho. Stillwill, 
Nathaniel Veuining. 
Henry Wright, 
Benjamin Eoybrock, 

his 

Johanis H foung, 

Mark. 

.Mare Ostrander, 

his 
Peter X Ostrander. 

Mark 

Henry Monfort, 
Joshaway Griffen, 
John Fleuwelling, 
Cornelius liegeman, 
Johannis l'oosenkrans, 
Joseph Houson, 
Dirok liegeman, 
Isaih Dalsen, 
Isaac Lossing, 
Jacob De Beysteur, 
John Mills, 
Cornelius Wiltsie, 
Tunis Schouten 



HISTORY OF FISHKILL. €><> 



The reader will observe a good many names that are no longer rep- 
resented by any of their descendents in the town, and will begin to 
think that we are overburdening him with names that he knows noth- 
ing of. These are the men. however, that made the early history of 
the town and every man of them is deserving of remembrance. They 
endured the hardships of the earl}- settlement, battled with the forests, 
hardened themselves by privation and want, and by the sides of 
streams and hillsides built for themselves homes. More than a cen- 
tury ago many of them finished their work. One by one, surely and 
steadily, they were followed by others, and long years ago the last 
lingering ones have fallen. To every son of Fishkill, whether he be of 
the "Manor born" or one of her adopted sons ; whether he inherit the 
blood of these men, or spring from other sires, it matters not. They 
are the fathers of the town, and because they are fathers in that rela- 
tion, are they the fathers of us all — and deserving of remembrance. 

In speaking of the early records of the county we have before notic- 
ed a deed of land that was conveyed for the purpose of building a 
Dutch Church at Poughkeepsie. We revert to this subject again and 
proceed to notice the early Churches in the town. The Churches in 
Poughkeepsie and Fishkill, from the most reliable information that 
can be obtained, were both of them organized in 1716. Previous to 
this organization there had no doubt been services performed, and 
occasional preaching in both of these parishes. This was the case at 
Hopewell prior to the Church organization. Services were held for 
the lack of better accommodations in barns. On one of these occa- 
sions, in a barn belonging to Mr. Isaac Storm, of Stormville, the 
preacher was speaking of Beelzebub, asking the question, "Who is 
Balzebub ?" A little Irishman, sitting in one of the leinters, thinking 
himself personally addressed, sprang to his feet and said, "Och, mon, 
that's asily toold by a mon of character; the high Praist of Hill, sir." 

The Dutch Church at Poughkeepsie, was the first church that was 
built in Dutchess County. The exact year of building it is not so ap- 
parent. Probably, however, about 1720, or soon after. The Church of 
Fishkill was built in 1731. The petition to his excellency, John 
Montgomery, Esq., states "that the members of said congregation 
have agreed amongst themselves to erect and build a convenient 
church, to the public worship of God, nigh the said Fish Creek." The 
building of the church is not positively stated in this petition, but in 
a certain bond bearing date the same year it is clearly stated, that 
they "had agreed and built a church." There was a Glebe attached 
to the Church. This Glebe land was purchased in two different lots. 



67 HISTORY OF FISIIKILL. 



One lot "containing seven and almost a half acres," was purchased 
from Madame Brett. The other portion "containing three quarters of 
an acre and fifteen rods, with the appurtenancies, whereon to erect a 
church or house, for the service or worship of them in manner and 
form as aforesaid, for the inhabitants of the Fishkill or South "Ward, 
and their heirs and assigns forever," was purchased from Johannis 
Terboss. The church of Fishkill was the first church built in the 
Rombout Patent. 

For twenty years it was the only church in the Patent. Tt was at- 
tended on alternate Sabbath mornings, by people living- far into the 
interior beyond Hopewell and Hackensack. For beside Poughkeepsie 
there was no other church, at that day on the east side of the Hudson 
above the Highlands, unless in the vicinity of Albany. Whenever, 
therefore, the preacher lifted his voice at Fishkill, it was the only voice, 
the only open pulpit in all that land. 

Rev. Cornelius Tan Schie, was the first pastor of the Churches of 
Fishkill and Poughkeepsie. He was duly installed over this field of 
labor on the 4th of Oct. 1731, removed to Albany in 1738. He was 
succeeded by Rev Benjamin Meinenia, the second pastor of the two 
Churches. His letter of recommendation by the Theological profes- 
sor in Holland, is written in Latin, and speaks of him as having un- 
dergone the proper course of study, as a "praestantissirnumjuvenem," 
a most excellent young man. On this account the letter states, "I 
joyfully have wished to recommend him to the love and favor of all 
good men." Dated, 1727. He was called here in 1745, retired 1758, 
and died Q th of Sept., 176J. He was buried in the grounds adjoining 
the Church at Fishkill. Mr. Meinenia, was succeeded by Rev. Mr. 
Van Nist, in Nov., 1758. But little is known of Mr. Van Xist. He 
only lived to retain his charge three years, and died in early manhood 
in 1761. He too was buried in the ground adjoining the church. Up 
to 1747, the Church at Fishkill was the only church edifice in the 
town, and together with that at Poughkeepsie, were the only (.'bundles 
in the County. The increasing settlements made at Fishkill, the ac- 
cession to Hie population from families who were attached to the 
English Church, as well as Presbyterian, began to make it manifest 
that other Churches were needed. Hopewell and New Hackensack, 
now more thickly settled, were beginning, too, to feel the need of 
public worship, nearer than Fishkill and Poughkeepsie. Church or- 
ganizations, were therefore established in both of these places. At 
Hopewell in 1757, and at New Hackensack in 1758. These organiza- 
tions were afterward associated with Poughkeepsie and Fishkill, and 



HISTORY OF FISHKILL 68 

wo continued for years having one settled pastor in charge of all of 
them. 

The first Presbyterian Church erected in the town being, also the 
first Presbyterian Church in the County, was erected at Brincker- 
hoffVille, two miles east of Fishkill Tillage. It occupied the site of 
the one which has so recently and so unfortunately been burned to 
the ground. 

From a manuscript in the hand writing of Rev. Mr. Clark, deceased, 
who appears to have made the early history of this Church, a subject 
of much inquiry, the following information is mostly obtained: 

Tradition reports, says the Rev. Mr. Clark, that this congregation, 
was collected about the year 1746, by the Rev. Mr. Kent. In 1747, 
Sept. 17th and 18th, the frame of the Presbyterian Meeting-House, 
was raised and an acre of ground was given for that purpose by Ja- 
cobus Terboss, Esq. The condition of the grant was that the Church 
be organized in accordance with the order of the Kirk of Scotland. 
The first interment in the above lot was Susan, wife of Stephen La- 
doe. This was on the 27th of Sept., 1747. 

In July, 1748, the Meethig-House was enclosed, and temporary 
seats were laid on the 2d day of July, of the above year. The Rev. 
Mr. Graham, preached the first sermon in the new, but unfinished, 
Meeting-House. The Rev. Elisha Kent, who preached one half his 
time in this place, being present with Mr. Graham, the assembly 
agreed to gather a church in this place. The next day, July 3d, (Sab- 
bath), after two sermons preached by Mr. Graham, four elders were 
elected, viz: Peter Monfort, "William Drake, James Vidleurne and 
John Cwer, (perhaps others). Rev. Chauucey Graham was ordained 
pastor of this Church, in connection with the Church at Poughkeepsie. 
The parsonage lot was purchased in the year 1750. In Sept., 1752, 
Rev. Mr. Graham's connection with the Church at Poughkeepsie, was 
dissolved by the Presbytery of New York, regularly convened at 
Newark. The ground of this dissolution was the "failure on the part 
of t lie Church at Poughkeepsie, to meet their pecuniary engagements 
His whole time was then devoted to this Church. 

In 1773, Mr. Graham left this Church, having been the Pastor twen- 
ty-three years. He died in 1734. From 1775 to 1783, the Church and 
congregation were greatly disturbed by the American Revolution. — 
For a time the place of worship was used as a hospital for the sick, so 
that the people enjoyed little ministerial service. In 1783, Rev. 
Isaac Blauvelt, Pastor of the Reformed Dutch Churches, of Fishkill 
and Hopewell, for two-thirds of his time, employed the other third in 



69 iilSTORY OF FISHKILL. 

this Presbyterian Church. His ministry continued seven or eight 
years. Rev. Mr. Marsh succeeded hirn preaching half of his time at 
Poughkeepsie, in J7 ( .)l or 92. Rev. Isaac Lewis succeded him from 
179? to 1800. Rev. John ('lark followed for two years, succeeded by 
Rev. Mr. Huntings. 

The third Church erected in the town, the first one too, of its de- 
nominational character in the county, the first on the east side of the 
river above the Highlands, was the Trinity Church, at Fishkill Vil- 
lage. This Church is one of the oldest Church edifices in the State, 
older by many years than any other in the county. It had original- 
ly a towering spire of much beauty of appearances upon which was 
perched the invariable weather cock. Which said venerable bird is 
still nourishing, apparently as young as ever, on the premises of Mr. 
Catheal, in full sight of his more ancient perch. The interior arrange- 
ments are believed to be precisely the same as when at first erected. 
May they continue as many years more to hallow the future as they 
do now hallow the past with their sweet memories. 

The early records of this Church are believed to have been lost 
during the Revolution. The time of the building of the Church can- 
not now be determined with entire certainty. 

Rev. Dr. Brown ofNewburgh, lion. (Julian 0. Verplanck and others, 
believe it to have been built about 1760. 

We have been favored with a valuable communication from Rev. 
Dr. Buel, Rector of Christ Church of Poughkeepsie, and accept of the 
information he offers as the most reliable that can be now presented. 
We arc indebted to the same gentleman for favoring us with the suc- 
cession of the Rectorship in this Church. In reference to the building 
of the Church the Dr. furnishes a copy of a subscription paper "for 
the purchase of the Glebe in some convenient place in Poughkeepsie, 
Rombout, the Great Nine Partners, or Beekman," bearing date, April 
2d, 1766. Which subscription furthermore distinctly states these 
words: "And inasmuch as there is not any settled church of England 
in the said county, by which means public worship, according to the 
Lifurgie of the said Church, is altogether neglected." From this 
Statement it would appear that there might not have been a Church 
edifice erected at thai time in the County. The first services, says 
Dr. Hud, were held by Rev. Samuel Seabury, lather of Bishop Sea- 
bury, in the year 1756. The account of his visit to the Society for 
the propagation of the gospel led them to agree to send a missionary 
to this county, when certain conditions were complied with. The 
conditions were that a church and residence should be built before 



HTSTORY OF FISHKILL. 70 



the missionary was sent. Accordingly Rev. John Beardsley, was 
appointed for the Precincts of Poughkeepsie, Beekman and Romhotit, 
and accepted Oct. 26th, 176(5. 

Freacked his first sermon at the house of William Bumfrey, in 
Beekman, Dec. 21st, 1766, from Luke 2d, 32d. Trinity Church and 
Christ Church, Ponghkeepsie. were united under one Rector for a 
period of nearly fifty years. A controversy between these two 
churches, grew out of this union, about the Glebe, situated at Pongh- 
keepsie, which they owned together, which was finally adjusted Jan. 
2d, 1797. Rev. Mr. Beardsley was removed to New York, Dec. 16th, 
1777, by order of the Council of Safety. 

The next Rector was Rev. Henry Yan Dyck. who accepted Jan. 
22d, 1787, dividing his time equally between the two Churches. He 
continued Rector until the spring of 1791, and was succeeded by the 
Rev. George H. Spierea, Nov. 12th, 1792. 

Mr. Spierea left Dec. 9th, 1795, and was succeeded by Rev. John 
J. Savers, Jan. 5th, 1795, who continued in the Rectorship two years. 
Mr. Savers was succeeded by Rev. Philander Chase, afterward Bishop 
of Ohio and also of Illinois, and the. founder of two Colleges, Kenyan 
College, Gambier, Ohio, and Jubilee College in Illinois. Mr. Chase 
came in 1794, and left for New Orleans, in 1705. Rev. Barzillai 
Bulkley succeeded him, Aug. 6th, 1806, and left Aug. 17th, 1809. 

At a Yestry Meeting of Trinity Church, Pishkill, held November 
2d, 1796, the following vestrymen were present : 

Jeremiah Green, 

Benjamin Snider, 

John F. Carman, 

John Southard, 

Greenlief Street, 

Francis I 'ever, 

Daniel C. Yerplanck. 
Having thus given a brief outline of the early organizations of the 
Episcopal and Presbyterian Churches, we recur again to the further 
outline of the Dutch Churches in the town. 

In 1764 the first church edifice in the eastern part of the town, was 
erected at Hopewell. The following year, 1765, the church at New 
Hackensack. This period of the church was very much disturbed by 
the unfortunate dissension of its own membership, organized under 
two leaderships or parties, called Coetus and Conferentia. The Con- 
ferentia party were tenacious about the old customs, ordination of 
ministers, iu Holland, the low Dutch language in the Church worship. 



71 HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 

The Coetus party were the progressive party, in favor of ordaining 
ministers in America, preaching in English, <fcc. 

Each of these parties supplied themselves with a preacher of their 
own taste. The Conferentia party, called Dr. Isaac Rysdike, in 1703, 
and in the same fall, the Coetus party called Rev. Henricus Schoon- 
maker. Both of these men officiated for a period of nearly ten years, 
over the same churches. It was a stormy period in the church, when 
bitter feelings were stimulated, and but little good done, and that 
little often times illy spoken of. This difference happily terminated 
in 1772. Dr. Rysdike continuing pastor, and Mr. Schoonmaker leav- 
ing for other fields of usefulness. 

About this time Dr. Rysdike, discontinued his charge over the 
Poughkeepsie congregation, devoting his time to Fishkill, Hopewell 
and New Hackensack. He died in 1790, and was buried under the 
spire of the church at New Hackensack, the floor being removed for 
that purpose. He was considered in his day, one of the most accomp- 
lished preachers and scholars in America. The classics were as far- 
miliar to him as his own Holland tongue, and was, also, a thorough 
oriental Hebrew scholar. Educated in the best universities abroad, 
tlie accomplishments of the gentleman and the sehollar were so 
blended as to lie inseparable. His affability and address arc to this 
day spoken of, and his appearance is said to hare been very imposing. 
In person the Doctor was rather stoutly made, and, as was the cus- 
tom of that day, rode through his charge on horseback. He always 
wore a cocked hat and wig, and invariably lifted his hat from his 
head in passing any one, and gave them a friendly salutation. Upon 
Sabbath mornings would ride to the church door and dismount, hand- 
ing his horse to the sexton, wbo stood in readiness waiting his com- 
ing. Rev. Mr. Dlauvelt became associate pastor with Dr. Rysdike, 
after 1783, continuing until Nov., 1790. Rev. Nicholas Van Vran- 
skir succeeded him in 1701, and died in the prime of manhood, in 1804. 
After this time the Church at Fishkill Village, called Dr. Cornelius 
D. Westbrook. He took this charge solely to himself, New Hacken- 
sack and Hopewell calling Rev. George Barkulo. Dr. Westbrook 
continued pastor at Fishkill for twenty-four years. Dr. Fisher suc- 
ceeded him in 1830, and was succeeded by Dr. Kipp in 1836. 

During the pastorate of Dr. De Witt, which began in 1812, Hope- 
well and New Hackensack dissolved the union which had so long 
existed, each being considered st rong enough to maintain a separ- 
ate church organization. This dissolution was made in 1826. Dr. De 
Witt remained a1 Eopewell. Was succeeded a1 New Hackensack, by 



HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 72 

Dr. Dwight, and he by the present pastor. Rev. Dr. Yan Cleef, was 
pastor at Hopewell fifteen years, was succeeded by Rev. Charles 
Whitehead, in 18*28. He was succeeded by Rev. Dr. Polhemus, in 
1835. Continuing twenty-two years, and was succeeded by Rev. 
Oliver C. Cobb in 1857. 

The dates of organization, &c, of the other churches of the town 
can be found in other parts of the Directory. 

Having thus treated of the churches of the town, before speaking of 
the local incidents connected with the Revolution, the reader will be 
privileged to examine an old muster roll of one of the first companies 
ever raised in the town, ostensibly to do battle for their King and 
country 



A Multer Roll oi the Men railed and pals'd in the 



Captain JACOBUS SWARTWOUT. 



Mens Names 



Shedraek Baker, 
Simon Schouten, 
John Schouten, 
Jacob Schouten, 
Henry "Wright, 
George Hines, 
Joshua Barker, 
Joseph Hornet, 
Anthony Coffin, 
James Bonnet, 
Henry Gray, 
Thomas Coffin, 
Daniel Xettleton, 
Richard Stanly, 
William Priuk'et, 
William Woodford, 
Henry Wiltsie.,_. 
Robert Shearer, 
Edwert Walker, 
James Picket, 
Mingo Lango, 
Stephen Bedford, 
Thomas Meredet, 
Nicholas Meyer, 
Jacob Collin, 
John Adam Wert, 
Hans Jorg Weatinan, 
.lames Brooks, 
Oliver Cromwell, 
Ephriam Barkley, 
Solomon Schouten, 
Hermanns House,' 
William Green, 
Cornelius Wiltsie, 
Peter Storm, 
.lames Green, 
Anion Allen, 
Joseph Mcintosh, 
William Clark, 
.lames Draper, 
Samuel fjlarck, 
Eleneza Cummins, 
Benjamin Cummins, 
Phillip Smith, 
William Gamble, 
Thomas Frost, 
Patriok Mitchel, 
Zebulon Mosier, 
Xacharia Parish, 



Day of 
lnliflment. 


Age. 


Where born. 


Trade. 


April 


1 


26 


Lous Island. 


Farmer. 


do 


5 


29 


Fishkills. 


do 


do 


5 


27 


do. 


do 


do. 


1 


18 


do. 


do 


do 


1 


27 


Staten Island. 


do 


do 


4 


22 


West Chester. 


Turner. 


do 


5 


30 


Dutches. 


Farmer. 


March 


31 


31 


Fishkills. 


do 


April 


9 


37 


Old England. 


Cordwainer 


do 


19 


18 


Dutches. 


Farmer. 


do 


4 


:;:> 


Connecticut. 


do 


do 


13 


17 


Xew England. 


do 


do 


8 


•21) 


Connecticut. 


do 


do 


9 


11 


Old England. 


Cordwainer 


do 


9 


26 


do. do. 


Farmer. 


do 


9 


40 


London. 


Sadler. 


do 


•2 


39- 


Long Island. 


Farmer.. . 


do 


9 


28 


New Jersey. 


do 


do 


4 


17 


Dutches. 


do 


do 


6 


16 


New England. 


do 


do 


1 


56 


Rhode Island. 


Labourer. 


do 


4 


17 


Goshen. 


C» >i >per. 


do 


9 


22 


Fishkills. 


do 


do 


3 


41) 


Flanders. 


Weaver. 


do 


7 


•21 


Fishkills. 


i larpenter. 


do 


3 


•20 


Germany. 


Labourer. 


do 


26 


28 


do. 


do 


do 


9 


•27 


New Jersey. 


Cordwainer 


do 


2 


20 


West Chester. 


Farmer. 


do 


•20 


;.i 


New England. 


do 


do 


•2 


J7 


Fishkills. 


do 


do 


] 


21 


Tappan. 


do 


do 


•2 


37 


Old England. 


Carpenter. 


do 


L8 


30-* 


Fishkills, 


Weaver. 


do 


26 


30 


Cong Island. 


Labourer. 


do 


26 


u; 


Dutches. 


Fanner. 


do 


IT 


•2d 


Connecticut. 


do 


do 


1? 


21 


do. 


do 


do 


L8 


17 


do. 


do 


do 


23 


17 


Boston. 


do 


do 


19 


19 


Connecticut. 


do 


do 


17 


•21 


Boston. 


do 


do 


17 


26 


do. 


Carpenter. 


do 


•2;; 


18 


Germany. 


Labourer. 


do 


•s:> 


18 


Dutches. 


do 


do 


15 


17 


do. 


do 


do 


II 


:::» 


Ireland. 


do 


do 


26 


•27 


New England. 


Carpenter. 


do 


17 


21 


Rhode Island. 


Labourer. 



County of Dutches, for Capt. Swartwout's Company. 

Nicholas Emans Gaberell, Isaac Tekhush, Lieutenants. April, 1761$. 



Out of what 


Company 
litia. 


Stature. 


Defcript 




of the M 


:Fcet. luetics: 


ion of Mens Perfous. 


Capt. H. Rosekrans, 


5 9* 


Black hair 


swarthy, well sett. 


do 


do 


5 11 


Brown hair, pock pit'd do. 


do 


do 


56 


Black do 


do. do. 


do 


do 


57 


Brown do 


brown compl'xn. 


do 


do 


5 10* 


Black do. 


mole on under lip. 


do 


do 


5 11* 


Red do. 


fresh color. 


do 


do 


59 


Light do. 


pale do. 


do 


do 


5 10* 


Black do. 


brown do. well sett. 


do 


do 


5 7 


Brown do. 


brown do. 


do 


do 


5 8i 


do. do. 


pale long visage. 


do 


do 


5 10 


do. do. 


fresh colour. 


do 


do 


5 1 


do. do 


do do 


do 


do 


5 5 


Light do 


do do 


Capt. Elijah Dubois, 


5 4 


Brown do 


fresh do 


do 


do 


5 6*. 


do do 


brown do 


do 


do 


6 


do do 


do do 


do 


do 


6 


do do 


do do 


do 


do 


5 9 


j Light do 


fresh do 


do 


do 


56 


do do 


do do 


do 


do 


54 


Brown do 


brown visage. 


do 


do 


5 8* 


Negro black. 


do 


do 


56 


Brown hai 


% fresh colour. 


do 


do 


58 


Black do 


brown do 


do 


do 


58 


do fresh 


compl'xn, brown vis. 


Capt. Corn. S 


wartwout 


6 * 


Brown do 


pale do 


do 


do 


57 


do do f 


•esh col'r, pock pitt'd 


do 


do 


5 2 


do do 


do do 


do 


do 


57 


do do 


do do do 


do 


do 


58 


do do 


brown do, long vis. 


do 


do 


55 


Gray do 


do brown do. 


do 


do 


5 10 


Brown do 


do 


do 


do 


5 11 


do do 


Buddy do 


do 


do 


5 11 


do do 


brown do long vis. 


do 


do 


5 7 


do do 


do do do 


do 


do 


5 10 


Brown do 


do pock pitted. 


do 


do 


5 


do do 


fresh, brown visage. 
do 


Capt. Ka. Bo 


*s. 


5 10 


Sandy do 


do 


do 


5 9* 


Brown do 


brown do 


do 


do 


3 3 


do do 


do 


do 


do 


5 6* 


Light do 


fresh do 


do 


do 


5 7 


Brown do 


brown do 


do 


do 


5 5 


do do 


do do 


do 


do 


5 6* 


do do 


do do 


Capt. Humph 


ries, 


5 8* 


do do 


do do 


do 


do 


5 3 


do do 


do do 


do 


do 


5 6 


Light do 


fresh do 


do 


do 


5 1 


Black ih) 


fresh do 


do 


do 


5 11 


Brown do ] 


ong visage. 


Capt. Dickerson, 


5 6* 


do do 


do do 



id HISTORY OF FISIIKH.L. 



We pass the French and Indian Wars over too hastily, if we regard 
them simply as having reference to the then difficulties between 
France and England. We take a far more correct view, when we 
see in the training to arms and deadly strife, the needed tutellage, 
which the coming years would reveal as so apposite and fitting. 

The men who fought the battles of England against the French and 
Indians were the young men of the country, who had been born and 
reared under a Monarchy. Had been educated vassels and minors, 
and needed further education to develope their manhood and make 
men of them. Not sycophants to cringe and crawl at the beet of 
Lords, as though Lords were made to ride over them; but men who 
felt with each renewed conflict and strife, that they were Lords them- 
selves, and had the patent right to it, not by favor of the Crown ; but 
by what their own strong arms and brave hearts had dared and done. 
The mind and spirit of the country had been developed. And the 
same men who fought with the young flush of manhood on their 
brows in 1660, wielded stronger weapons and dealt all the heavier 
blows, fifteen years later in the full strength of their manhood, when 
with inextinguishable purpose they resolved that they would die free- 
men, rather than live slaves. The French and Indian wars when 
viewed in this light are clad with grand realities Their proportions 
dazzle us, just as the dawn gives promise of the day. The dawnings 
of American Revolution may, therefore, with propriety date back to 
the French and Indian wars of 1760 and '63. 

At the opening of the Revolution, the first conflict to anus at Lex- 
ington, in the spring of 1775, the whole country was startled at the 
impending imminence in which it had been so suddenly placed, and 
yet whoever reads carefully, or even carelessly the record of those 
times must now see that the culmination at Lexington was a neces- 
sity. The work might have been delayed, but delay only added to 
its strength. The Provincial Congress speedily assembled at New 
York, and began at once to devise measures for the general safety. 
County Committees were organized. These County Committees car- 
ried the instructions they received to the Precincts or Towns. The 
Precincts at once organized "a committee of observation" who took 
cognizance of the disaffection under their special charge. We give 
here a list of the persons forming this "Committee of Observation" in 
the town of Fishkill : 

DIRCK (1. BRINXERHOFF, Chairman. 

('apt. JACOBUS SWAKTWOUT, Dept. Chairman. 

JOHN 11. SLEIGHT, Clerk. 



HTSToRY OP FISHKILL. 76 



Jacobus De Graff, Richard Van Wyck, 

Capt. Isaac Hageman, Henry Godwin, 

Elias Yan Benschoten, John Langdon, 

Capt. Joseph Horton, Win. Yan Wyck, 

Thomas Storm, Capt. Jacob Griffin, 

Col. Abm. D. Brinkerhoff, Mathew Van Beuschoten, 

John Havers, Capt. Isaac Ter Boss, 

John S. Brinckerhoff, Henry Schenck, 

John A. Brinckerhoff, Henry Rosecrans, jur. 
Dock Theodoras Yan Wyck. 

The first meeting of this "Committee of observation" was held on 
Thursday, the 13th day of Jnly. Washington had then been appointed 
in command of the American forces, and was then in person at Bos- 
ton. From this time, July 13th, to the adjournment of the Commit- 
tee, on the 27th day of September, during the period of ten weeks, at 
the very opening of the war, we have a perfect record of their action 
upon the varied business that came before them. This paper is in 
perfect preservation, covering more than twenty pages of finely and 
well written material of larger size than foolscap paper. Inasmuch 
as these papers have never been published, we shall not hesitate to 
make free use of them iu this sketch. 

Before this, however, that none may be confused at the locality of 
"Capt Jacob Griffin's," we would here state that it was situated upon 
the Hopewell road, just beyond Swartwoutville. This place is now 
occupied by Mr. Curtis. The building itself being much the same in 
outward appearance as when kept as a tavern stand by Capt. Griffin, 
and known then as the "Rendezvous." It was situated at a point 
convenient of access to all parts of the town. 

At the second meeting of this committee, on Saturday, the 29th day 
of July, in the afternoon, at the house of Capt. Jacob Griffin, "the 
persons who were appointed to tender the association to the inhabi- 
tants and freeholders of this Precinct, returned the said association 
papers agreeably to an order, made at the first of this instant. This 
Committee taking into consideration that a number of persons have 
not yet signed the association, by reason of their not having an op- 
portunity, occasioned by the shortness of time, committed for the re- 
turn thereof, and others that are not convinced about signing the same, 
ordered, That the Chairman of this Committee do write a letter to the 
President of the Provincial Congress, at New York, acquainting him 
that a number of the inhabitants of this Precinct are not convinced 
about signing the association. Ordered, That time be given for the 



i I HISTORY OF FISIIKILL. 



return of the said association papers, till Tuesday, the loth of Aug. 
next, at ten o'clock iu the forenoon of the same day at the house of 
Capt. Griffin. 

Resolved, That the several Captains of the Companies in this Pre- 
cinct be requested to call their Companies together by the twelfth day 
of August next, in order that the association be tendered to them for 
signing and that no coercive means be used to make them sign, and 
make a return to this Committee by the 15th of Aug. next, and that 
the Capts. be requested to call their companies together on the follow- 
ing days, viz : 

Capt. Southard's Company, on Saturday, the 5th of Aug. next. 
Capt. Brinckerhoff, on Tuesday, 8th Aug. next. 
Capt. Horton, on Saturday, 12th Aug. next. 

Ordered, That Dr. Theodoras Van Wyck do acquaint Capt. Bedell 
to call his Company by the 12th Aug., and make return by the 15th, 
and that Mathew Tan Benschouten, do request Capt. Leyster to call 
his Company together by the 12th, and make return the 15th Aug. 

Resolved, By this Committee that a fine of 4 shillings lie laid upon 
each of the members of this Committee for no attendance, unless a 
reasonable excuse can be made, the legality of the excuse to be ad- 
judged by not less than six of the committee. And for the first quar- 
ter of an hour after the time appointed six pence ; for half an hour 
one shilling ; for a whole hour two shillings. 

Committee Chamber at the house of Capt. Griffin at Fishkill, Aug. 
15th, 1775. Pursuant to adjournment of the 29th ultimo, to this day, 
at the hour of 10 o'clock, a. m., at the house aforesaid. The Chair- 
man and Clerk appearing at the hour, the list was called and the fol- 
lowing persons of the committee not appearing, their names as de- 
faulters were accordingly entered for not appearing at the hour, viz: 
Jacobus De Graff, .John G. Brinkerhoff, 

Capt. Isaac Ilageman, Mathew Van Benschoten, 

Elias Van Benschoten, Capt. Isaac Ter Boss, 

Capt. Joseph Horton, Win. Van Wyck, 

Thomas Storm, Henry Schanck, 

Col. Ainu. Brinkerhoff, Henry Rosecrans, jur, 

Capt. Jacobus Swartwout, John A. Brinkerhoff, 
John Meyers, Doct. Theodoras Van Wyck. 

The above gentlemen did not appear at a quarter past ten o'clock. 
Richard Van Wyck, Capt. Jacobus Swartwout, and John G. Brink- 
erhoff appearing before half past ten, and none of the other defaulters. 
were fined six pence. 



HTSTORY OF FISHKILL. 78 



Jacobus De Graff, Capt. Isaac Hageman and EliasVan Benschoten 
appearing before the hour of eleven. The rest were deemed subject 
to the fines agreed to at the last adjournment, being 2 shillings each. 
And the above De Graff Hagemen and Van Benschoten, one shilling 
each. Which fines were deducted from the landlord's bill of this day, 
for victuals and drink. 12 o'clock. The Committee being met they 
proceeded upon the business of the day. The first thing that offered 
was to make a true copy of the names of those persons who signed 
and who refused signing the association. "Which being done the 
Chairman was ordered to transmit the same to the Provincial Con- 
gress, with the utmost dispatch, and keep the original in his hand for 
the inspection of the committee. 

The next things in order were charges and specifications. One of 
these charges was " For drinking damnation to the Church of Eng- 
land." Another, "For denying the Authority of the Continental Con- 
gress, and all authority under them." Ordered that the next meeting 
of this committee be at the house of Mr John Langdon, on Thursday 
the 17th, at 2 o'clock. Resolved, that Lieuts. Langdon and Van Ben- 
schouten bring such a detachment as their Capt. shall think sufficient 
to bring John Doe before the sub committee at the time of our next 
meeting. 

Ordered, That John A. Brinkerhoff wait upon John Doe with a 
letter from the Chairman of this Committee, requesting his attendance. 
Ordered, That on refusal of compliance that Capt. Jacobus Rosecrans 
order a detachment of his men to apprehend the said John Doe, and 
bring him before this Committee to answer such matter as shall be 
alleged against him. Resolved, That there should be inquiry made 
by the several members of this Committee, in the road districts, what 
number of arms can be purchased or hired for the Continental forces, 
and make report at the next meeting. 

At a meeting of the major part of this Committee of observation, 
convened by the Chairman, or an extraordinary call from the County 
Committee, before the day of adjournment at Capt. Griffin's, on Mon- 
day "21st August, 1775. 

The Chairman took the chair and reported to the board that on 
Saturday the 18th ult., he received a resolve from Chairman of the 
County Committee. That in consequence of which resolve, he called 
this meeting of the Committee. Then read the resolve as follows, to 
wit: 

Dutchess County Committee, Aug 18th, 1775. That the Commit- 
tee in each Precinct to be attended by a sufficient guard go to the 



79 HISTORY OF FIfHKILL. 

persons failed Tories, and in a friendly manner reqnest them to part 
with their firelocks for the use of the Continental Forces, at a reason- 
able price, to be affixed by one of the Committee and a person to be 
elected by the person parting with the firelocks, and in case of their 
disagreement, then the appraisement to be made by a third person to 
be nominated by the other two appraisers, and upon refusal, to take 
such firelocks forceably, and to value them, and keep a list of the 
names of the persons from whom such firelocks shall be taken, toge- 
ther with the value of each firelock. 

In consequence of a former resolve of this Committee of the loth 
hist., the following persons were appointed to hire or purchase arms 
in the several following districts. To wit : 

Deirck G. Brinkerkoff, - 

John H. Sleight, 

Isaac Ter Boss. )■ For the District of Capt. Southard's Company. 

Theod. Yan Wyck, I 

Henry Godwin, J 

Jacobus Swartwout, ) 

Jacob Griffin, >For Capt. Griffin's Company. 

John Myer, ) 

KtZVyck, } ** »-»* *-**■ 

Joseph Horton, ) 

Abm. Brinkerhoff, >Capt, Morton's Company. 

Thomas Storm, ) 

Richard Yan "Wyck, ) 

John A. Brinkerhoff, >Capt. Hageman's Company. 

Henry Rosecrans, jur. ) 

Mathew Yan Bensckoten, \ ,-, . T , ,. , ,.,.,,. 

John (1. Brinkerhoff, \ Ld ^ Le 3 ster s Company . 

Charges specified — Mr. Henry Rosecrans, one of the members of 
this committee reported that, John Doe came to the house of him, the 
said Henry Rosecrans, on Sunday, the 20th August inst.,with a drawn 
cutlass, and with great violence, damned the recruiting officers, tin- 
men listed by them, and all proceedings of the committee. The Com- 
mittee taking the charge against John Doe into consideration, are of 
opinion that the words spoken are very contemptuous against the au- 
thority invested in this Committee and detrimental to the public 
cause. The question being put whether the said John Doe be sent 
for immediately before this committee : It was resolved unanimously 
that Capt, Jacob Rosecrans, Lieuts. Benschouteu and Langdon, to 



HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 



SO 



wait upon the said Doe and desire him to appear immediately before 
this Committee ; and on refusal of compliance the said Captain Rose- 
crans take a file of men and bring him forcibly before this Committee, 
and that the said Rosecran, Beuschouten and Langdon do likewise 
request Daniel Wright, Benjamin Rosecrans and ¥m: Van Amburgh, 
jur., to attend this Committee at the same time as evidences against 
the said John Doe. 



A list of the pieces and names of the persons from whom the arms 
were purchased for the Continental service: 

Pur- Passed 

£. S D. 
1 12 

1 12 

2 10 
2 15 
2 00 



Obadiah Cooper, 
Cornelius Adriance, 
Nathan Bailey, 
Jacob De Peyster, 
James "Weeks, 
Hugh Conner, 



chased Muster 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



John Laurence, 
Jeremiah Martin, 
John Brinkerkoff, 
Richard Yates, 
John Leyster, 

Henry Yfyckoff, 
Isaac Holmes, 
Jonathan Du Bois, 
Jacob Miller, 
Caleb Moicer, 
Wm. Brooks, 
Jacobus Swartwout, 
Jacob BrinkerhofF, 
Jacob Griffin, 

"Wm. Raynor, 
Wm Algelt, 
Rod Swartwout, 
John Parks, 

Joh "Wiltsey, 
Garret Storm, 
Gorus Storm, 
Joh Dewitt, 
Thos Storm, 
Peter Depew, 
Richard Osburn, 



2 10 

2 10 
2 00 
1 10 
1 10 
con'm'd 00 



Purchased in the dist. of 
Capt. Southard's Co., by 
Doct Theodoras VanWyck 
and Henry Godwin, for 
the use of the Continental 
army. 



do 
do 
do 
do 



Pa'dMu 1 12 

do 2 00 

con'm'd 00 

Pa'dMu 1 15 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do 
do 
do 
do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



2 00 
2 10 
2 05 

1 5 

2 10 



In the dist. of Capt. Ste- 
phen BrinkerhofTs Co., by 
Richard Van "Wyck, John 
A. Brinkerkoff and Henry 
Rosecrans, jun. 



Purchased in the dist. 
of Capt. Griffin's Company, 
by Jacob Swartwout, Ja- 
cob Griffin and John 
Myers. 



2 qq Capt. Bedel's Company, 
1 15 ^J "W m > Van "Wyck and 
1 10 



Henry Scheuck. 



00 
00 
10 
15 
10 
20 
10 



Capt. Horton's Company 
by Joseph Horton, Abin. 
Brinckerhoff and Thos. 
Storm. 



SI 



HISTORY OF FISIIKILL. 



Wm Hogeland, 1 

Nieh Brewer, jun, 1 

Th V Bremen, 1 

Corn Brewer, 1 

James Compten, 1 

James Weeks, 1 

Philip V Plank, 1 

Stephen Duryee, 1 

John Ackerman, 1 

Joseph Taylor, 1 

Jacob Barker, 1 

Peter Van De Water, 1 

Peter YanStenburgh 1 

Abm Sleight, 1 

Abm Rogers, 1 

Jacob Midagh, 1 

Wm Barker, 1 

Isaac Hageman, 1 
Jacob l)n Bois. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



2 01) 
2 14 i) 

2 00 
1 l.-.o 
:», no ii 

3 10 

1 Jim 
3 00 

2 10 



00 

]()() 

111!) 
00 
15 
01) I) 
15 
5 
00 



Capt. Leyster* s Company 
by Mathew VanBenschon- 
ten and John 8. Binkerkoff. 



Capt. Hegeman's Com- 
pany, by Jocubns Degraff, 
Isaac Hegeman and Elias 
Yan Bensehouten. 



50 Kims. £105 10 



ommittee met at the honse of Capt. Jacob Griffin, Sept. 9th. 

The matter of complaint of John Roe against John Doe, coming be- 
fore this board. Stephen Duyea declares that while John Roe and 
John Doe were together drinking he never heard John Doe drink dam- 
nation to the Church of England ; but some other toast. This board 
taking the above into consideration, alter hearing the proof's and alle- 
gations of both parties are of opinion that, that the said John Doe is 
not guilty of the charges alleged against him by the said John Roe, 
and this board do further say that the said John Roe, is guilty of a 
notorious falsehood in saying that the evidences were not examined 
and sworn to in his presence. 

We have thus given to the reader liberal extracts from this old 
Revolutionary document. It is marked on the outside: The General 
Proceedings till 9th Sept., 1775. It is of very little account to the 
public now to know who John Doc and John Roe wen — such kind 
of questionings can do no earthly good, and cannot be gratified. Its 
enough to know that John Doe was a reputable character, kept good 
company, not a brawler, nor a busy body, but had lived so long, and 
held offices so long under the crown that he honestly believed all pro- 
ceedings of Committees of observation, Colloidal Congress, 4c, usur- 
pations of rightful authority. John Doe from his stand point looked 
upon the whole business as an outbreaking of mobery and vandalism, 



HISTORY OF FISH KILL. 82 

which only needed a little wholesome discipline, a straight collar tight- 
ly buttoned to the chin, here and there, and the whole thing would 
dissolve. John Doe believed it, and because he believed it, could 
even then see these same men before whom he was arraigned as a mover 
of seditions, dissensions, &c, most suppliantly beseeching him to in- 
tercede for them, to save their necks from the halter, their lands from 
confiscation and their families from disgrace. He was a King's man. 

FOK THE KLXG, 

Thick or thin. 

Lest some too might suppose that John Doe was a troublesome, 
single handed fellow, we can do no better service than to disabuse 
their minds of this fallacy at once. John Doe had as many heads al- 
most as there are ears of corn in a corn field, not branching out of one 
body , but each several head with other organizations as perfect as 
the head. John Doe was ubiquitous besides. In every township or 
ward, village or city. In Rombouts Precinct, in a population embrac- 
ing 762 freeholders and inhabitants, 502 signed the association papers 
and 260 refused, being a little over one third o^the whole population 
enrolled. Lest too some sensitive townsmen might think such an ex- 
position a little disreputable to the fair name and fame of our old town, 
we will continue the exposition a little further. Beekman Precinct re- 
turned 386 as her whole numerical force. Of this number 257 sigued 
and 135 refused, a shade worse to do it will be observed, than our old 
town. Poughkeepsie returned in all 295 men, of these 213 signed and 
82 refused, only a shade better than either of the others. Rhinebeck 
returned in all 480 men, 262 for and 218 against, decidedly worse than 
either, almost in fact equally divided. The reader therefore, it is pre- 
sumed, is already satisfied with the ubiquitous John Doe. We could 
extend the comparison still further iuto neighboring counties and 
Stales, and find much the same state of affairs there existing. The 
one conclusion to which we should inevitably be brought would be, 
that no particular section could claim privilege to throw stones at the 
other. They were all living in glass houses together, and the wonder 
must ever be, that how with such a divided home sentiment, appar- 
ently too weak, if united, to cope with so formidable an adversary, the 
Independence of the States could ever have been obtained. The dif- 
ficulties under which it was obtained invest it with as daring a hero- 
ism, as invincible a purpose, as inextinguishable a will, as can be 
found in any chapters of great deeds in the world's great history. 

The American Pledge, or Association Papers, as they are called in 
the General Proceedings, was as follows : 



83 HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Persuaded that the salvation of tin- rights and liberties of America 
depend, under God, on the firm union of its inhabitants in a rigorous 
prosecution of the measures necessary for its safety; and convinced 
of the necessity of preventing anarchy and confusion, which attend 
a dissolution of the powers of government ; we, the freemen; freehold- 
ers and inhabitants of Rombout's Precinct, being greatly alarmed at 
the avowed design of the Ministry to raise a revenue in America, and 
shocked by the bloody scenes now acting in Massachusetts Pay, do, 
in the most solemn manner, resolve never to become slaves, and do 
associate, under all the ties of religion, honor, and love to our country, 
to adopt and endeavor to carry into execution whatever measures may 
be recommended by the Continental Congress, or resolved upon by 
our Provincial Congress, for the purpose of preserving our Constitu- 
tion and opposing the execution of the several arbitrary acts of the 
British Parliament, until a reconcilation between Great Britain and 
America, on constitutional principles (which we most ardently desire) 
can be obtained, and that we will in all things, follow the advice of our 
General Committee respecting the purposes aforesaid, the preservation 
of peace and good order, and the safety of individuals and property. 

After the evacuation of Xew York, in the fall of 1776, and the im- 
mediate loss of the seaboard, with Pong Island and part of Xew Jer- 
sey, the operations of the army were carried on further into the in- 
terior of the country. Fishkill then became, from its safe position 
north of the Highlands, a place of much consideration. The town was 
at once crowded with refugees, as they were then called, who sought 
by banishing themselves from their homes on Long Island and New 
York, to escape sure imprisonment, and find safety here. The inter- 
ior army route to Boston passed through this place. Army stores. 
workshops, ammunition, &C, were established and deposited here. 
The Margins Be Chastellux, in his travels in North America, says: 
"This town, in which there arc not more than fifty houses in the 
space of two miles, has been long the principal Depot of the American 
Army. It is there they have placed their magazines, their hospitals, 
their workshops, Ac, but all of these forma town in themselves, com- 
posed of handsome large barracks, built in the woods at the foot of the 
mountains; for the American Army, like the Romans in many re- 
spects, have hardly any other winter quarters than wooden towns, or 
barricaded camps, which may be compared to the hiemalia of the Ro- 
mans. " These barracks were situated on the level plateaux between 
the residence of Mr. Cotheal and the mountains. Portions of these 
grounds were no doubt then covered with timber. 



HISTORY OF FISH KILL. S4- 



Guarding the approach from the south, stockades aud forti- 
fications were erected on commanding positions, and regularly 
manned by detachments from the camp. Upon one of these 
hills, rising out of this mountain pass-way, very distinct lines of 
earth works are yet apparent. Near the residence of Mr Sidney 
E. Van Wyck, by the large Black Walnut trees, and east of the 
road near the base of the mountain, was the Soldier's Burial Ground. 
Many poor patriot soldier's bones lie mouldering there ; and how many, 
if we did but know this, we should be startled at their magnitude. — 
This almost unknown and unnoticed burial ground holds not a few, 
but hundreds of those who gave their lives for the cause of American 
Independence. Some fifteen years ago, an old lady who was then 
living at an advanced age, and who had lived near the village until 
after she had grown to womanhood, told the writer that after the bat- 
tle of White Plains she went with her father through the streets of 
Fishkill, and in places between the Dutch and Episcopal Churches, 
the dead were piled up as high us cord wood. These were buried 
there. The wounded of the battle who afterwards died, were buried 
there. The constant stream of death from the hospitals were buried 
there. The small pox, which broke out in the camp, and prevailed 
very Tiialignantly, added many more. All of these causes would 
swell the number, until it would seem large enough and too large to 
have remained to this day so unobserved and unknown. Many of 
these were State Militia men, and it seems no more than just that the 
State should make an appropriation to erect a suitable monument over 
this spot. Rather than thus remain for another century, if a rough 
granite boulder were rolled down from the mountain side and inscrib- 
ed: To the unknown and unnumbered dead of the American Revolu- 
tion ; that rough unhewn stone would tell to the stranger and the pas- 
sen - by, more to the praise and fame of our native town, than any of 
us shall be able to add to it by works of our own. For it is doubtful 
whether any spot in the State has as many of the buried dead of the 
Revolution as this quiet spot in our old town. These hospitals will 
now command further notice. Some of these hospitals were located 
in the barracks about the encampment, others in the more immediate 
vicinity of the village. The Episcopal Church was used for that pur- ' 
pose all the time it was needed. The Dutch Church not so much, pos- 
sibly only when the pressure of circumstances demanded it. The 
Academy building, located on the hill above the residence of Mr. 
James B. Brinkerhoff, and in the rear of a building now occupied by a 
colored family, was also used as a hospital. Upon the site of the 



85 HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 

house now located there, there was what was then called a Green 
house, whether from the color of the building or otherwise, we are 
not able to say. Several of the young Doctors resided there. Among 
these were Dr. Edmondson, Dr. Wainright, Dr. Ledger, Dr. Adams, 
and Dr. Duffel Mr. and Mrs. Lake kept house for the young Doctors. 
Beyond this, the Presbyteriau Church was further called into requisi- 
tion for hospital purposes. Disaffected persons were also confined 
there. 

The following letter from Gen. McDougal, which has never before 
been published, will jxive a more clear insight into the hospital depart- 
ment located at Fishkill : 



WHEREAS the Principal Surgeons and Physicians of the Hos- 
pitals at this place represented to me in December, one thousand seven 
hundred and sixty eight, then commanding at this Post, that the bar- 
racks and Episcopal Church were so crowded with the sick that their 
condition was rendered deplorable, and were otherwise in a suffering 
condition for want of proper covering, and there beingno public build- 
ings fit to receive or accommodate the sick, but the Presbyterian 
Church of this town, which impelled me from necessity to order the 
said church to be taken and occupied for the purposes aforesaid; 
which was accordingly occupied; whereby considerable damage has 
been done to said building, now, therefore, I do hereby certify that at 
the time aforesaid, 1 engaged the public faith that whatever damage 
should be done to the said church would lie repaired or repaid by the 
public. Given at Fishkill, the 8th of March, 1780. 

ALEX. McDOUGAL, 

M. General. 



We pass now from t lie hospitals to the more prominent places of 
public interest connected with this period of the history of the town. 
The "Walton House," as it lias been termed, is one of them. This 
name has already led to much needless mistake. Cooper first intro- 
duced this fictitious name, for the laudable purpose, no doubt, of not 
bringing private families too conspicuously before the public. While 
this is highly commendable in a novelist ; in a sketch designed to im- 
part information to the people of the towu respecting their own town 
history, no such purpose is needed nor desirable. The people of the 
town should therefore know that the Walton House of Cooper is none 



HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 86 



other than the residence of Mr. Sidney E. Van Wyck. The place has al- 
ways been in possession of the Van "Wyck family, from the first set- 
tlement of the country, and never yet passed into other hands. This 
house was situated in close proximity to the*barracks occupied by the 
American forces at this Post. Washington quartered there, and other 
officers made it their home as long as the necessity required it. Other 
places in the town were similarly occupied. The old building at 
Swartwoutville, belonging to Mrs. Swartwout, wa^. for a time the 
quarters of the Baron Steuben, and other members of his staff. 

The house of Mr. Mathew V.B. Brinkerhoff likewise accommodated 
distinguished hosts. Gen. Lafayette resided there ; Doct. McNight and 
others. Washington, too, was often a temporary inmate of the family. 
While quartered there, Gen. Lafayette was taken sick, remaining sick 
six weeks, attended by Dr. Cochran It was while he was there sick, 
that a child was born in the family, and the mother of the child in- 
formed the writer that she should always remember Lafayette in the 
act of kissing and rejoicing over her son. The hotel occupied at 
present by Mr. Davis, was also a place of much notoriety. Part of 
the old building is still standing. "Washington is said to have often 
dined there. The Yer Planck house, near the river, was for a time 
the quarters of the Baron Steuben. This old Yer Planck house, too, 
has other historic associations ; the society of the Cincinnatti was there 
organized, and will again be further alluded to. 

Of other places of public interest, the site of the residence of Mr. 
John C. Yan Wyck may justly claim a passing attention. The first 
Constitution of the State of Xew York was first published there in 
1777. Samuel Loudon, who had up to the time of the evacuation of 
New York, published his paper there, removed his press and material 
to Fishkill It was for a time the only paper that could be found to 
publish the news of public interest. The Convention of the Repre- 
sentatives of the State of Xew York, were also at the same time obliged 
to migrate from place to place. They held short sessions at Harlem 
and White Plains, retreating before the invaders to Fishkill, and there 
armed themselves for defense against any opposition that might be of- 
fered. While at Fishkill, the Convention held their session in the 
Episcopal Church, afterward removed from here to Poughkeepsie, and 
from there to Kingston. The Post Office was kept at the house oi 
Mr. Loudon. Mr. Joseph Jackson Diddle, of XewHackensack,has in his 
possession quite a large file of these papers in perfect preservation. 

The sword of Washington, bearing the maker's name, J. Bailey, 
Fishkill, and now preserved in a glass case in the Xational Museum 



87 HISTORY <F FISHKILL. 

at "Washington, was without any doubt manufactured in this place. 
The old workshop was still standing but a few years ago. Other 
evidences beside the maker's name, which is in itself conclusive, favor 
the assertion, and but make it all the more apparent. "We will close 
this part of our subject by mentioning a few incidents associating the 
name of "Washington with the Revolutionary history of our town. At 
one time while "Washington was in the town, he was a guest of John 
Brinkerhoff. Mr. Brinkerhofi' lived in the stone house occupied at 
present by Mr. "White, near Swartwoutville. He was a very ardent 
outspoken "Whig, though advanced in years, aud very anxious to ob- 
tain information, and was pressing zealous^- his point to know of cer- 
tain movements, which were then goingouin the army. Washington in- 
terrupted by asking, "Can you keep a secret, Mr. Brinkerhoff }" "Oh, 
yes," he replied, "certainly," expecting no doubt the ready answer. 
" So can J," replied "Washington. One other incident in connection 
with this place. "When it grew time to retire, "General," said Mr. 
B., "you are Commander-in-Chief of the forces of the United States." 
"Yes sir," replied Washington, "I believe that I am." "General," 
said Mr. B., "I am Commander-in-Chief, too, of my own household, 
and you are my guest. I am always in the habit of closing the duties 
of the day by calling my servants and family together, reading the 
Scriptures and offering family worship. The reading of the Scriptures 
and the prayer will be in the Low Dutch language ; but would be glad 
to have you join in spirit in the worship." To which Washington 
readily assented, when they all bowed together in prayer. One other 
incident. On one occasion, when Washington passed through the 
eastern part of the town, the people being eager to see him, had as- 
sembled at a place where the roads cross each other. As Washington 
rode up and halted, they all at once uncovered their heads before him. 
As soon as he observed this, he said, "Gentlemen, put your hats on ; 
I am but a man like yourselves, and wish no such deference shown me." 

At the time of Arnold's treason, Washington was in the vicinity of 
Fishkill, going to West Point from this place, and arrived there just 
when the act had been consummated. The notorious Joshua II. 
Smith, was arrested here a day or two afterward, on charge of com- 
plicity in aiding the treasonable scheme. We extract from a work 
published by him in England so much as refers to Fishkill : 

"I mentioned to Gen. Arnold the distance I accompanied Mr. An- 
derson, which gave him apparently much satisfaction. His dinner 
being ready, I partook of it, refreshed my horses, and in the evening 
proceeded to Fishkill to my family. Here I found General Washing- 



HISTORY OF FISHKILL 88 

ton had arrived in the course of the afternoon, on his return from visit- 
ing Count Rochauiheau, and I supped in his company, with a large 
retinue at Gen. Scott's. The next day I went on business to Pough- 
keepsie, and returned to Fishkill the ensuing evening. It was on the 
25th of September, about midnight, that the door of my room where 
I lay in bed with Mrs. Smith, was forced open with great violence, 
and instantly the chamber was filled with soldiers who approached 
my bed with fixed bayonets. I was then without ceremony drawn 
out of bed by a French officer named Grovion, whom I recollected to 
have entertained at my house not long before, in the suite of the 
Marquis De Lafayette. He commanded me instantly to dress myself 
and to accompanj- him to Gen. "Washington, having an order from 
the General, he said, to arrest me. I then desired of him the privilege 
of having my servant, and one of my horses to go with him to General 
Washington, which he refused, and I was immediately marched off 
on foot the distance of 18 miles." Smith was afterward tried and im- 
prisoned, but by some means escaped and went to England with the 
British army. 

We recur again to the Ver Planck house, to which we have before 
made allusion. This old mansion house was occupied by the Baron 
Steuben, and is situated a couple of miles north of Fishkill Lauding. 
It is built of stone, a story and a half high, and still in good preserva- 
tion. The society of the Cinciunatti was organized here, whose first 
president was "Washington, and which still continues to exist. This 
circumstance, without alluding to the distinguished members of the 
family who have gone from this old homestead to fill positions of pub- 
lic trust, and adorn our American literature with the leaves of ripe 
and chaste scholarship, aside from these, this old homestead will 
forever lie connected with Revolutionary associations. Inasmuch as 
this organization was perfected in the town, we will further note the 
constitution by giving this to the reader in full. 

May 13th, 1783. A committee, consisting of Generals Knox, Hand 
Huntington, and Captain Shaw, met at the quarters of Steuben (Ver 
Planck's), and adopted the following constitution: 

It having pleased the Supreme Governor of the disposition of human 
affairs to cause the separation of the colonies of Xorth America, from 
the dominion of Great Britain, and after a bloody conflict of eight 
years to establish their free, independent, and sovereign states, con- 
nected by alliances founded on reciprocal advantages, with some of 
the greatest princes and powers of the earth : To perpetuate, therefore 
as well the remembrance of this vast event, as the mutual friendships 



SO HISTORY OF FISHK.ILL. 

which have been funned under the pressure of a common danger, and 
in many instances cemented by the blood of the parties, the officers of 
the American army do hereby in the most solemn manner associate, 
constitute and combine themselves into one society of friends to en- 
dure so longas they shall endure, or any of their oldest male posterity, 
and in failure thereof, the collateral branches who may be judged 
worthy of becoming its supporters and members. The officers of the 
American army, having generally been taken from the citizens of 
America, possess high veneration for the character of that illustrious 
Roman, Lucius Quintilus Cincinnatus, and being resolved to follow 
his example, by returning to their citizenship, they think they may 
with propriety denominate themselves the Society of the Cincinnatti. 
The following principles shall be immutable, and form the basis of 
the Society of the Cincinnatti : 

An incessant attention to preserve inviolate those exalted rights 
and liberties of human nature for which they have fought and bled, 
and without which the high rank of a rational being is a curse instead 
of a blessing. 

An unalterable determination to promote and cherish between the 
respective states, that unison and national honor so essentially neces- 
sary to their happiness, and the future dignity of the American 
Empire. To render permanent the cordial affection subsisting among 
the officers, this spirit will dictate brotherly kindness in all things, 
and particularly extend to the most substantial acts of benificence, 
according to the ability of the Society, toward those officers and their 
families who unfortunately maybe under the necessity of receiving it. 
The, general society will, for the sake of frequent communication, 
be divided into state societies, and these again into such districts as 
shall be directed by the state society. 

The societies. of the district to meet as often as shall be agreed on 
by the state society, those of the state on the fourth day of July an- 
nually, or oftener if they shall find it expedient; and the general so- 
ciety on the first Monday in May annually, so longas they shall deem 
it necessary, and afterward at least once in every three years. At 
each meeting the principles of the institution will be fully considered 
and the best measures to promote them adopted. 

The state societies will consist of all the members residing in each 
state respectively, and any member removing from one state to another 
is to be considered in all respects as belonging to the society of the 
state in which lie shall actually reside. The state societies to have a 
President, Y ice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Assistant Trea- 



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HISTORY OF FlFlIKII.I,. 90 



surer, to be chosen annually by a majority of votes of the stated 
meeting. 

In order to obtain funds, which may be respectable and assist the 
unfortunate, each officer shall deliver to the treasurer of the State So- 
ciety one month's pay, which shall remain forever to the use of the 
State Society. The interest only of which, if necessary, to be appro- 
priated to the relief of the unfortunate. 

The Society shall have an order, by which its members shall be 
known and distinguished, which shall be a medal of gold, of a proper 
size to receive the emblems, and be suspended by a deep blue ribbon, 
two inches wide, edged with white, descriptive of the union of Ameri- 
ca with France. 

General Washington continued President general of the society 
until the time of his death, and was succeeded by General Hamilton 
iu 1800. General Cotesworth Pinckney, of South Carolina, succeeded 
him, followed by General Thomas Pinckney. Gen. Ogden, of New 
Jersey, succeeded him, followed by Gen. Lewis, of ISTew York, Major 
Pophan, Gen. Dearborne, and others. 

The Academy building to which we have also before alluded, is 
deserving justly of further notice. The site of the building has been 
already described. We are unable to give the date of the erection of 
this academy. It was built years prior to the revolution and was the 
first academy erected in the county. 

Dr. Livingston and other distinguished men in Church aud State 
are said to have received their early academic education at this place. 
For a time Rev. Chauncey Graham taught there, and during the Rev- 
olution Dr. Rysdike taught a classical school in Fishkill, as appears 
from advertisements in the paper published here at that time The 
early organization of an academy in this place is worthy of being re- 
membered, and the people of the town can recur with pride to this 
noble act of one hundred years ago. If the advantages of a classical 
education were so appreciated then, how much more should they be 
regarded now. Surely in this respect we have no reason to rejoice, 
rather to sorrow, at the decline of public interest in such laudable in- 
stitutions. The academy building was sold eventually and removed 
to Poughkeepsie and the lesson is but too apparent. Keep always 
the best things for home. 

Having now followed the more prominent features of public inter- 
est down to the close of the American Revolution, we shall not pur- 
sue the subject further. The growth and prosperity of the town, its 
agricultural, manufacturing, banking and other interests are made fully 



91 HISTORY OF FISIIKILL. 



apparent by statistics in other portions of the Directory. We shall 
therefore close by giving brief sketches of the more prominent public 
men of the town. This part of onr subject might be very much ex- 
tended by making it a subject of special investigation. 

TUR BOSS. 

One of the first, if not the first representative man in this part of 
Dutchess County, was Johannus Tur Boss. 

This name has either been changed from its original or otherwise 
has now become extinct among us. 

He is reported in the census of 1714, and had then a family of five 
children. He was at this early day a justice of the peace and owned 
lands about Pishkill Village. The ground upon which the Dutch 
Church is located was purchased from him. He was elected a mem- 
ber of the Colonial Legislature, from 1716 to 1725, for a period of nine 
years ; is also spoken of as being Judge in old manuscripts, and died 
before 1735, over one hundred and thirty years ago. Was evidently 
a leading man in his day. 

Jacobus Tur Boss, of the same family, and probably a younger bro- 
ther of Johaunis, owned lands about Brinckerhoffvillc. The site of 
the Presbyterian Church was given by him, containing one acre, upon 
the condition that it "be organized in accordance with the Kirk of 
Scotland." He was a member of the Colonial Legislature from 1737 
to 1743. 

VERPLANCK. 

Philip Verplanck was a native of the patent, a sou of the elder 
Gulian Verplanck. 

He was a surveyor and engineer, a man of great ability and attain- 
ments. Verplanek's Poial is called after him. He represented the 
Manor of Cortlaudtiu the Colonial Legislature, from 1737 to L764, for 
a period of nearly thirty years, and may justly be considered as one of 
the prominent representative men of the patent, though not represent- 
ing any part of his native district. 

Judge Daniel C. Verplanck was a native of the town of Pishkill, 
and represented the District in Congress, from 1803 to 1809. Was the 
father of Gulian C. Verplanck, of New York City, and elected Judge 
of the County of Dutchess in 1828. A man of much liberality and 
amiability of character. "William B. Verplanck was member of the 
Legislature from Dutchess in 1796, '97 and '98. 

Gulian 0. Verplanck, though never representing his native district, 
still justly is deserving of a prominent place among the representative 



HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 92 



men of the town. A member from New York City to the Legislature 
for tour successive terms following 1820, Representative to Congress 
for four successive terms from 1825, also a Member of the Xew York 
Senate from 1838 to 1841. Aside from these positions of public trust, 
the productions of his pen have added even more than these to his 
well earned fame. His work on Shakespeare may justly be ranked 
among the choice productions of our American literature. His lec- 
tures upon Evidences of Christianity, bear, too, the marks of the same 
classic pen. 

He still enjoys the comforts of a ripe old age, and belongs to the 
men of a former generation who have added grace to American 
letters. 

BRINCKERHOFF. 

Dirck Brinckerhoff belongs to the representative men of a hundred ' 
years ago. Was a Member of the Colonial Assembly from 1768 to 
1777, a member of the first Provincial Congress, Chairman of the Vigi- 
lance Committee of the town, and a Member of the Legislature from 
1777 to 1787, Colouel in the Militia, and occupied other positions of 
trust. 

In person the Colonel was of large size, and somewhat swarthy 
complexion. If not austere, yet decided in his favor or opposition. 
Kept fine horses and rode in what was then called a phaeton, a car- 
riage with room for two and a driver, winch was at that time con- 
sidered a mark of some notoriety. 

1). A. Brinckerhoff was elected to the Legislature of 1808 and '9, 
but beyond this we can give no further information. 

Abraham Brinckerhoff was a Member of the Legislature in 1784 and 
"85. "Was a farmer, and carried on in connection with this merchan- 
dizing and milling, and was widely known in the community in which 
he lived. 

SWARTWOUT. 

Gen. Jacobus Swartwout when a young man had served as a Cap- 
tain in the French and Indian Wars, was a member of the Vigilance 
Committee of the town, and repeatedly filled the office of Supervisor. 
Was elected to the Legislature from 1777 to 1785, afterward elected 
to the State Senate, which office he filled from 1784 to 1795. In per- 
son- the General was a fine looking man, full six feet high, and very 
erect in his bearing. As he grew past middle life, his hair grew gray, 
which gave him a venerable appearance. He wore green glasses, and 
was an inveterate snuffer. A man, too, of great physical strength 
and personal courage. When over eighty years of age would ride 



93 HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 

away his wheat to the river, and lift his hag upon his shoulder with 
the ease of a youug man. 

A little incident better illustrates the man. During the war of 1812 
he was at the river when news came that some sad calamity had be- 
fallen our northern army. At which a young man present took oc- 
casion, at once, to rejoice. "Young man," said the General, then 
nearly eighty years of age, "I have taken care of many just such young 
men as you are, and if I hear an}- more of this," shaking his head at 
the same time, with significant emphasis, "old as I am, I'll take care 
of you, sir." He served in the Revolution, was afterward promoted 
General, and died in 1826, over ninety years of age, having served the 
people of his town in every position of trust faithfully and true. A 
man unswerving in his integrity, and upright in all his purposes. — 
The loss of such men make always wide breeches in communities. 

Jacobus Swartwout, Sen., the father of the General, held the office 
of Supervisor and other positions of trust, but never attained to the 
eminence of his son. 

ADRIAXCE. 

Judge Abraham Adriance resided at Hopewell, and earned on al- 
ternately both farming and merchandizing. Was in his day an active 
politician, and held in a large sense of the word the confidence of the 
people. 

The Judge was a man of very pleasing manners and easy address. 
Somewhat portly in appearance, and withal very humorsome, and 
aided the humor on all occasions by entering into it with a hearty 
good will of his own. Gen. Root, in speaking of him, said that he 
was as good a fugleman as he ever knew. He was elected to the 
Legislature in 1798, continuing a member of the Assembly until 1800. 
He removed to Poughkeepsie, and was elected to the State Senate in 
1803, and continued in the Senate until 1806, and afterward was 
elected Judge. 

Colonel Isaac R. Adriance is still living at an advanced age in 
Poughkeepsie. Has filled various positions in the town. Was elected 
to a seat in the Assembly in 1825, and has shown himself not deficient 
in sterling energy of character. 

SCHEXCK. 

We freely confess our inability to do justice to the elder representa- 
tives of the Schenck family. The family is one of the old families in 
the town, mainly settled about Mattcawan and New Hackensaek. 

John Schenck was a Member from Dutchess to the Assembly in 



HISTORY OF FISIIKILL. 94 



1777 arid '73. Guysbert Schenck in 1780 and '81. Henry Scheuck in 
1791. Abraham [I. S^aeack a member iu 1804, '5, '6. 

la the Provincial Congress, Guysbert was member of the first, 
Henry, John, and Paul each members of the third. Abraham H. was 
also elected to Congress in 1815. 

STORM. 

Thomas Storm, better known as a mark of distinguishment from 
other members of the family by the name of Esq. Tommy, was a man 
of much public influence in his day. He lived iu the eastern part of 
the town, east of Hopewell. Kept a tavern-stand, with the attach- 
ment of a store connected with it, and was much iu public life. Was 
a member of the Vigilance Committee of the town iu the time of the 
Revolution, a Member of the Legislature from 1731 to 1731. After- 
ward removed to N"ew York City. Was returned to the Legislature 
from New York City, from 1793 to 1803. Was twice elected speaker 
of the Assembly, and afterward ran for Lieutenant Governor of the 
State. He was a medium sized mau, of pleasing manners and wiuniug 
address, abounding in genial humor. 

Col. John Storm, of the same family, resided on one of the old 
homesteads north of Stormville, aud now occupied by his son Charles 
G. Was Colouel of the Militia of the town, and elected to a seat in 
the Legislature in 1807. If not filling conspicuously public positions, 
was nevertheless iu a large sense of the word a public man in private 
life. Though but a mere _vouth he held a commission iu the army of 
the Revolution, aud was ever willing, zealous, and ready to serve in 
any good work. Was in the truest sense of the word a peace maker, 
and in this respect a public benefactor deserving of lasting remem- 
brance. 

Frank and undisguised in manner, and as manly in appearance, he 
truly belonged to the old fashioned gentlemen of the town, who were 
in truth and reality just what they seemed to be. 

VAN WYCK. 

Dr. Theodoras Van Wyck was a descendent of the first generation 
of the Van Wyck family in Fishkill Hook, and father of the late Gen. 
Abraham Van Wyck. After receiving the advantages of a liberal 
education, he prosecuted the study of medicine, making it his profes- 
sion, aud established himself in its practice in the community where 
he was born. Was a member of the Vigilance Committee, a very 
zealous supporter, fearless and outspoken in favor of the war. Was a 
member of the second aud third Provincial Congress. This in fact is 



05 HISTORY OF FISHKILL. 



only a poor outline of a character which has much to commend it, but 
we lack the all essential requisite, the material to do the subject justice. 

Isaac Van Wyek was a descendent of the family at Fishkill Village. 
Was a fanner and in connection with farming- carried on at times 
other speculations in grains. Was four times elected to the Assem- 
bly between 1794 and 1811. Was" a medium size man, very social, 
pleasing and popular in his manners, and held in much respect in the 
community. 

Theodorus R., better known as Judge Van Wyck, was of the Hope- 
well branch of the family. Was elected to the Legislature in 18U3 and 
1804, and afterward elected Judge. Had done service in the Revolu- 
tion, of a hardy, robust constitution capable of much physical endur- 
ance. Somewhat reserved toward strangers, but very indulgent in 
his own family. Ever prompt in business, and upright in all his 
dealings. 

William W., of Fishkill Hook, was twice elected from Dutchess to 
Congress, after 1821. Was a man of much public influence. A man 
too of much reading and general information, and tilled his position 
with honor. After this he removed to Virginia, bought lands and 
carried on the farming business there, and always received the deserv- 
ed and well merited respect of those with whom he came in contact. 

Of the other members of the family, Gen. John B. was elected to the 
Legislature in 1816, Stephen D. in 1329. and Col. Richard C. in 1842. 
HALSEY. 

Samuel B. Halsey, son of Dr. Halsey, a long settled physician at 
Flopewell. Having received a liberal education, pursued the study 
of the law, and practiced his profession in his uative town. Was 
elected to the Legislature in 1827 and 1831. Afterward removed to 
Xew Jersey and has frequently been elected to the Legislature in that 
State and filled the position of speaker. 
WHITE. 

Dr. Bartow W. White a distinguished physician residing at Fishkill 
Village, to which place he came when a young man from Westchest- 
er.County. Dignified and courteous in his manners, he practiced his 
profession and received the entire confidence of the community to an 
advanced age. Was elected to Congress from this district in L825, 
I'm- ..lie term and is yet well remembered by the community in which 
he spent his active life. 

JACKSON. 

Judge Joseph I. Jackson was educated for the profession of the law 



HISTORY OF FISHK1LL 96 

and resided at Fishkill Tillage ; but soon discontinued the law and 
turned his attention to agriculture. Was always regarded as a most 
sate and judicious counsellor. Systematic and methodical, combined 
with purest integrity of character. Xot a breath of suspicion sullied 
his good name. "Was a member of the Legislature in 1821 and 1822 
and elected judge of the county in 1840. 

DUBOIS. 

Lewis was a member of the Legislature in 1786 and '87. Koert in 
1810 and '11, 1820 and '21. Peter £. in 1842. 

Of the other representative men of the town we can but mention a 
few of them by name. Isaac Teller elected to Congress in 1854, and 
still filling his position of affibility. Dr. Theodore Y. W. Anthony, 
elected to the Legislature in 1834 and '35, and now actively engaged 
in his profession. James Mackin of Fishkill Lauding, elected to 
the Legislature in 1859. Self-made, persistent and energetic. John 
K. Myer a member of the Legislature in 1837, having filled other 
positions in the town. 

We are quite aware that in now closing the sketch of the represen- 
tative men some names may have been overlooked. These however 
can be readily added at some future period. 

The sketch is at best but very imperfect ; but is nevertheless the best 
that our limited material will permit us to make. 

There always must be exceptions to general rules. We make but 
one, inasmuch as the man himself was an exception. He was not a 
representative man, had in all probability never held from the hands 
of the people any higher office than the office of Path Master of a country 
road district. Was not in fact a public man, if to do acts of public 
service only entitle to that distinction. If however to be widely 
known may favor some other purpose, then P.urgune Van Alst was in 
no limited sense of the word a public man, since he was known by 
every one. 

Burgune Van Alst, better known as Uncle Burgune, was a genuine 
Long Island Dutchman, somewhat coarse in his general appearance, 
with a jolly red face that told well of good keeping, and a keen red eye 
that sparkled like a gem in its own little dominion. Of the lower 
part of his person, his waist had been so much let out in its nether 
appendages, that it had long ceased further to exist, and just where the 
waist once had been, an almost perfect arc of a circle, as regular as 
the outline of a new moon was most fittingly appended. This, while 
it made a certain tilting back of the head necessary, in order to pre- 



97 HISTORY OF FISIIKILL. 

serve always the proper poise of gravitation, served also the other 
purpose of giving to gravity, mien. Just in fact the cut and figure 
of a man who could tell his own sto ries, crack his own jokes and never 
wimper a muscle Of course then what Uncle Burgune said was al- 
ways true, because being a large man he had large means of observa- 
tien, and moreover was alwa}-s well authenticated. Uncle Burgune 
could do some things which it were well to think of even in these 
days of Jehu driving — these days of fast horses, and taster young men. 
They may well blush, for all their modern Abdallas and Hambletonians 
are put to shame and grief by the horses and horsemanship of three- 
quarters of a century and more ago. He went to the river once upon a 
time, for Uncle Burgune said so, to take some butter of his own, and 
his ueighbors, an office which he delighted iu doing, and drove as usual 
his airy, fleet-footed blacks. Before he got near half way back, a 
shower came up, he said, as black as a blaeJc hat. 

It was almost an even thing with him, for he hadn't observed it 
until it came right upon him. So he whistled to his blacks, and they 
started and those were the horses that could travel ; for Uncle Burgune 
always insisted that it was a little the evenest race that he had ever 
had in his life time. Could distance any tiling else, but this time just 
barely kept the winning lead neck and neck throughout. For when 
lie got home the butter tubs had lost their lids and were swimming 
full oi'water in the back part of the wagon, and not a drop had touch- 
ed him, not one It was true, Uncle Burgune said, every word of it, 
and could be every hit of it well authenticated. 

A little man by the name of Ben. Way, chancing to meet Uncle 
Bergune among a number of men, asked him whether he had ever 
heard of his success in shooting quails ? 
"No, never; and how many did you shoot, Mr. Way l" 
""Well, now, since you have never heard, I'll tell you. 1 saw a large 
lloek of quails running around a hay stack, and how to shoot them, I 
couldn't tell. There were so many of them and they kept running 
and running all through one another. So 1 took my old French mus- 
quet and struck it a whack across a log, and bent it so that 1 shot all 
around the stack and killed every one of them." "Well now, Mr Way, 
since you are talking about shooting, I'll tell you what 1 did once, 
what I tell you now, is the truth, every word of it. Von did a big 
thing, Mr. Way,'/ big thing, and I don't wonder at your wanting to 
tell of it. I was out once shooting pigeons, and they were so thick ; 
1 had nothing but a single barrel of my rifle loaded. Just then a big 
flock settled upon a long straight dry limb. They sat so close to each 



AWS SBilEil 



Main Street, Fishkill Village. 

DEALER IN 



TIN, COPPER AND SHEET IRON WARE, 



Hoofing, Gutters. 



PUMPS AND LEAD PXPF, 
britjmjyjvma. w\mre* 

lLAE][?8 Ml© SStE^SlElS ®Q1L. 



PARTICULAR ATTENTION PAID TO 



Gr litters. Leaders, Roofing, &c. 



ISF^ The attention of housekeepers, and others, is called to the EM- 
PIKE GAS BURNER, the best hurning parlor stove made ; the 
MORNING AND EVENING STAR, cook stove, for coal or wood, 
a superior stove in every respect ; and the. GUARDIAN wood stove, 
all of the latest styles and best make. • 

HEATERS AND RANGES, portable and stationery, ou liberal 
terms. 



-> x 



.MGE.VT FOR 



GROYER & BAKER'S 



ELASTIC STITCH 




Sewing Machines, 

AT THE 

FISMBKHjJL I*JMJ\ m MJYG. 



I v Circular and samples of work sent oui application. 
OTHER MACHINES FURNISHED TO ORDER. 



vM * 



Boot and Shoe Dealer, 



NEW STOKE NEAR NO. 3 ENGINE HOUSE, 



ma.tte.a.W.a.:n". 



A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF 

Wa^er-Proof Boots, Shoes, Gaiters and Rubbers 

AT NEW YORK PRICES. 




52BEPS mm® ®m&- mm&» 

BOWS BOOTS, OF ,1£,L, Al^YDS, 

LADIES' KID BALMORALS, 

JMUiitet J^&oofa} JM^eat ^^Tfevn ^^al»nola'l& ? 

AND A GREAT VARIETY OF 



ORDERS RESPECTFULLY SOLICITED AND SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



j&rieiTwr SF-xaFuaac 



J. L.- EU1BILL & 80R, 



MATTEAWAN. 



gealersin jlrj dodds* (Rroteros, frouisiowi, 

' CUT SMOKED MEATS, 




m 



FKESH 
TEAS. 




WtKBSMIBELlS, 818GMM&Y, 

HARDWARE, JJIUfiS, Mf DICISTJE8. 

Shoemaker's Furnishing Goods. 
POWDEK by the KEG, and at Retail. 

ALSO, SHOT, GUN GAPS, ETC*, 

AT NEW YORK 'PRICES. 

J?3'/iei; Q/ovacco, QyeaaiJ, (2/nuM. 

THE HIGHEST MARKET VALUE PAID FOR 
ALL FARM PRODUCE. 



N. B.— RAGS TAKEN IN TRADE. 



HISTORY OF FISIIKILL. 98 



other that they touched all along — clear out to the eud of the limb. 
Well, sir, I drew up my rifle just so that I hit the centre exactly, and 
it split through both ways and caught every one of them by the toes. 
Ton should have seen such flopping and fluttering. I then loaded my 
rifle again and cut the limb off, aud had just all I could do to carry it 
home." As Uncle Burgune grew in years lie enjoined upon his family 
that he must not be buried at Hopewell Church. "You must bury me 
on the hill behind the barn. I won'tsiir a step," said he, "if you take 
me anywhere else " And it is said when the funeral procession started 
the horses balked, and many old ladies were slily winking and inti- 
mating that Uncle Burgune was out holding the horses. Be this as it 
may, Uncle Burgune was the man who always had a reason for the 
faith that was in him. For he said he wanted to be where he could 
hear whether his black folks threshed or not, for they wanted a good 
thai of watching. 



wnsaass mi© pabtuss 

OF ALL KINDS FURNISHED BY 

JAMES SMITH 8c SONS, 

CONFECTIONERS, 

13 <fc 15 market St., Fo'keepsie. 



We will take charge of Parties of all kinds, Weddings, Receptions. 
Banquets, Collations, Dinners, Suppers, Ac., Ac, to furnish the table 
with everything needed, thus relieving the parties interested, of all 
care or trouble of this branch of their entertainment. We will attend 
personally, to the arranging of the tables, in any part of this or the 
adjacent counties. Our 

©(Easts 5 © 8AQLIS8, 

are of superior quality, and our ORXAMEXTAL WORK, is of the 
latest styles, and for ARTISTIC SKILL AND BEAUTY we chal- 
lenge any to compete with us. 



WE WILL SEND 

It@© Creum, Cake, &§», 

to private families or others, in any quantity, from 1 or 2 quarts up to 
any amount required, to any place on the line of Steamboat, Railroad 
or Stage, having superior facilities for doing so, packed without extra 
charge in ice to keep 24 hours if necessary, after leaving our place of 
business, thus persons at a distance, can be supplied as easily as at 
Poughkeepsie. All orders by mail strictly attended to. 



OUR 

RESTAURANT, 

is open at all times of day and evening, when HOT MEALS, as well 
as all the delicacies are served up in the best style. 

JAMES SMITH A SONS, 

13 and L r > Market Street, POUGHKEEPSIE, X. Y. 



1866. 



Ackerman George, farmer, 

Aekermau Matthew V. B. farmer, 

Ackerman Martin S. butcher, 

Ackerman Abraham L. farmer, 

Ackerman Jasper A. farmer, 

Ackerman Andrew J. carpenter, 

Ackerman David L. farmer, 

Aekermau James, carriage and sleigh maker, 

Aekermau J. C. fanner, 

Ackerman A. W. 

Ackerman Dorcas, 

Ackerman E. P. teacher, 

Achaeon Robert, shoemaker, 

Adams Samuel, carpenter, 

Addiugton W. R. Fishkill Landing, in State Ti 

Addington Samuel, carpenter, 

Adkins John, col'd, 

Adkins Francis, col'd, 

Adkins Peggy, col'd, 

Adkins Margaret, col'd, 

Adkins Samuel, col'd, 

Adkins Thomas, col'd, 

Adkins Mathew, col'd, 

Adriance Charles P. 2d, 

Ager John, carpenter, 

Ager Henry, boatman, 

Alden Henry A. Snpt. Rubber Works, 

Alsdorf Leander, tinsmith, 

Aldridge Thomas, brickmaker, 

Aldridge Benjamin, brickmaker, 

Alger Stephen W. farmer, 

Alverson William, boxmaker, 

Alexander Charles H. col'd, boatman, 

Allyn George Mrs. 

Ambery William, teamster, 

Ambler Robert, 

Ambler William, spinner, 

Amermau 0. V. clergyman M. E Church, 



New Hackensack. 
do. 
do. 
Matteawan. 
Hughsonville. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
do. 
Carthage Lauding, 
do. 
Hughsouville. 
"do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Fishkill Village. 
easurer's office, Albany. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Fishkill Village, 
near do. 
do. do. 
do. do. 
do. do. 
do. do. 
do. do. 
Carthage Landing. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing. 
do. 
do. 
Xew Hackensack. 
Wappingers Falls, 
near Fishkill Village. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Glenham. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 



101 



DIKECTOKY OF FISHKILL. 



Andrews James, wool spinner, 
Anderson William, laborer, 
Anderson John, file cutter, 
Anderson Charles, book-keeper, 
Anderson Joseph, shoemaker, 
Angel Job, farmer, 
Angel Owen W. farmer, 
Annan John, farmer, 
Annan Margaret, 
Anthony ¥m., farmer, 
Anthony Theodore, farmer, 
Anthony T. V. W. physician, 
Anthony Wm. X. farmer, 

Anthony Nicholas, fanner. 
Anthony Yan Wyck, farmer, 
Arbuckle Wm., carpet weaver, 

Armstrong A. W. stove dealer, <fcc, 

Armstrong James, laborer, 

Armitage Joseph, 

Ardell James, hatter, 

Aston Sophia, 

Ashworth Wm. II. carriage trimmer, 

Atwood Alman I), butcher, 

At wood Alexander, 

Ball Edward, merchant, 

Baker Wm., farmer, 

I laker Rufus, carpenter, 

Baker Benajh, carpenter, 

Barrett S. P. drover, 

Barhyte Stephen, moulder, 

Barhyte Johu P. moulder. 

Barker Absalom, shoemaker, 

Baxter Wm. M. physician, 

Baxter .lames, farmer, 

Baxter Wm. M. farmer, 

Baxter Xurris, livery, 

Baxter Augustus W. grocer, Fishkill Landim 

Bellew James, laborer, 

Bassett John G. cigar maker, 

Baily Elisha, 

Baily Samuel J. machinist, 

Bailey Edward machinist, 

Bartley Alary, boarding house, 

Bartow Alexander, hank teller, 

Baldwin John II. 

Barlow James K. merchant, 

Harlow John, baker, 

Harlow Thomas, tile cutter, 

Barculo Ann, 

Baraclaugh Thomas, Dept. P. M\, 

Barton Cornelius, laborer, 

Barton John J. farmer, 



Glenham. 

New Eackensack. 

Matteawan. 

do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Hughsonville. 
New Eackensack. 

n. Fishkill Village, 
n. Fishkill Village. 

do. 

do. 
Glenham. 

do. 
do. 
do. 

Wappingers Falls. 
do. 

Glenham. 
do. 

Matteawan 
Fishkill Landing. 

do 

Matteawan. 

do. 

Fishkill Village. 

New Eackensack. 

Matteawan. 

do. 

do. 

Fishkill Landing. 

do. 
Matteawan. 
Wappingers Falls. 
do. 
Fishkill Village. 
do. 
(W. Teller & Co.) 

Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

Hughsonville. 

Matteawan. 

do 

Fishkill Landing. 

Fishkill Village. 

Fishkill Landing. 

Wappingers Falls. 

do. 

Matteawan. 

n. Fishkill Village. 

Glenham. 

Hughsonville. 

Fishkill Village. 



DIRECTORY OF FISIIKILL 



102 



Barton Jacob, farm laborer, n. Fishkill Tillage. 

Barton Heniy, farmer, n. do. 

Barton Luniaree, teamster, do. 

Bates Win , laborer, Wappingers Falls. 

Bates Henry P. laborer, Wappingers Falls. 

Bates Nicholas, gardener, Hughsonville. 

Barclay George, Ni'w Hamburgh. 

Berger Leftert S. farmer, New Hackensack. 

Beaton "Win., carpenter, Matteawan. 

Beach Benjamin H. blacksmith, do. 

Beach George W. machinist, Fishkill Landing. 

Bedford Stephen, Fishkill Village. 

Bedford Edward H. farmer, Glenham. 

Bedford Sarah, widow, do. 

Beecher John, blacksmith. Fishkill Village. 

Beech er Erastus, blacksmith, do. 

Berry Benjamin M. hatter, Matteawan. 

Benjamin Frank, clerk, Fishkill Village. 

Berger Martin L. clergyman E. D. church, Fishkill Landing. 

Benson Mary, boarding house, do. 

Benson B. T. moulder, do. 

Cell Owen, gardener, do. 

Bell William P. physician, Fishkill Landing. 

Belknap Rufus R. miller, Matteawan. 

Bentley Adam, print works, Wappingers Falls. 

Bently Robinson, do. 

Bentley James, tile cutter, Matteawan. 

Bentley Joseph, file forger, do. 

Bennett Gilian, teamster, Glenham. 

Berrian Wm. mason, Hughsonville. 

Bingham Thomas, Wappingers Falls. 

Biker Andrew, butcher, Glenham. 

Birks George rile cutter. Matteawan. 

Birks Margaret, do. 

Bish Henry, moulder, Fishkill Landing. 

Bishop Joseph, merchant, Matteawan. 

Bishop John, laborer, Fishkill Landing. 

Blackman Wm. B. merchant, Fishkill Village. 

Blossom Joseph R. Matteawan. 

Bloomer Gilbert, farmer, Wappingers Falls. 

Bloomer Abel, farmer, n. Fishkill Village. 

Bloomer Wm laborer, n do. 

Bloomer Smith, fanner, n. do. 

Bloomer Phebe, tailoress, Fishkill Landing. 

Bloomer David, machinist, do. 

Bloomer John, laborer, do. 

Bloomer Wm., machinist, Matteawan. 

Blyth Wm., engraver, Wappingers Falls. 

Bogle Wm., chemist, do. 

Boice Abraham, machinist, Matteawan. 

Boyce Homer, butcher, do. 

Boyce Sylvester H. butcher, do. 



103 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Boice William, machinist, 

Boyce John, farmer, 

Boon Elizabeth, 

Bausset John, farmer, 

Bansset John, shoemaker, 

Bawker Thomas, calico printer, 

Bowman Henry, col'd, 

Bowman Henry, col'd, 

Bowue Mary A 

Bowne Elizabeth, 

Bowne Phebe E. widow, 

Bowne Stephen S. 

Bostwick Charles, fanner, 

Booth George, grocer, 

Booth Almira, widow, 

Booth George, printer, 

Booth John, carpenter, 

Booth "William, moulder, 

Bogardus John S. furniture, 

Bogardus Deborah, widow, fancy goods, 

Bogardus Abraham A. tailor, 

Bogardus Samuel, carpenter and builder, 

Bogardus Alfred, carpenter, 

Bogardus Frederic, mason, 

Bogardus Charles W. laborer, 

Bogardus John, laborer, 

Bogardus Richard, 

Bogardus Oliver, mason, 

Brady James, laborer, 

Brett Abraham, merchant, 

Brett John W. post master, 

Brett Ann E milliner, 

Brett Catherine, widow, 

Brett Gertrude A. 

Brett Harvey, blacksmith, 

Brett James, machinist, 

Brett Charles H. pattern maker, 

Brett Wesley, machinist, 

Brett Francis, wool sorter, 

Brett E. Augustus 

Brett ('apt. James, 

Brett Rev. Edgar, agent, 

Brett William, Ferry street 

Brett Walter, presidenl first National bank, 

Brinckerhoff Richard II. fanner, 

Brinckerhoff Samuel, col'd, 

Brinckerhoff Charles, col'd, 
Brinckerhoff Mathew V. I?, farmer, 
Brinckerhoff James B. farmer, 
Brinckerhoff Jane, 
Brinckerhoff Hannah, 
Brinckerhoff Dcrick, 



Matteawau. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Wappingers Falls. 
do. 
do. 
Carthage Landing, 
u. Fishkill Tillage, 
do. 
do. 
Fishkill Village. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Glenham. 
Fishkill Village, 
do. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Fishkill Village, 
do. 
do. 

Glenham. 
Fishkill Village. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawau. 
Fishkill Village. 
.1... 
do. 
do. 
Matteawan. 

do. 
do. 

do. 

Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
do. 

do. 

Carthage Landing. 
New Ilaekensaek. 
Wappingers Falls, 
n. Fishkill Village. 
n. do. 

do. 
do. 

do. 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKIIX. 



104: 



Brinckerhoff Zebulon, machinist, Fishkill Lauding. 

Brinckerhoff Wesley, farmer, do 

Briiickerhoff John H. jr.. carpenter, Glenham. 

Brinckerhoff Theodore, Fishkill Landing. 

Brinckerhoff Daniel, nurseyman, Fishkill Landing. 

Brinckerhoff Charles, nurseyman, do. 

Brinckerhoff John H. sen., farmer, do. 

Brinckerhoff Isaac, do. 

Brinckerhoff Dubois, nurseyman, do. 

Brinckerhoff Stephen, farmer, Carthage Landing. 

Brower Isaac, col'd, Wappingers Falls. 

Brown W. P. printer, Fishkill Village. 

Brown Catharine A. milliner, do. 

Brown Samuel W. pedlar, do. 

Brown Sarah, widow, do. 

Brown William R. Matteawan. 

Brown Alonzo C. machinist, do. 

Brown Francis W. do. 

Brown James, machinist, do. 

Brown James, shoemaker, Fishkill Landing. 

Brown James, col'd, gardener, do. 

Brindle Betty, Wappingers Falls. 

Brindle William, laborer, do. 

Browning William, hank teller, Fishkill Village. 

Brundage James, farmer, Matteawan. 

Brundage James, saloon, Fishkill Landing. 

Brundage Charles W Capt. harge Independence, do. 

Brundage Alton, shoemaker, do. 

Brevoort John H. stage driver, Fishkill Village. 

Brysan Andrew, Capt. U. S. navy, do. 

Bruce William, farmer, do. 

Brennan Wm. laborer, New Hackensack. 

Brownell Nathaniel, farmer, n Fishkill Village. 

Bramer Wm. C, shoemaker, Wappingers Falls. 

Bramer Joseph, farmer, Hughsouville. 

Bramer Peter H. New Hackensack. 

Brower Sylvester, farmer, Hughsouville. 

I .rower James 0. D. fanner, Wappingers Falls. 

Bristol Miles, farmer, Hughsouville. 

Brocklesby Joseph, shoemaker, Wappingers Falls. 

Brewster William, carpenter, Hughsouville. 

Bridge Stephen, wagon maker, Wappingers Falls. 

Brierly Mark, bleacher, do. 

Brierly Mark, Sen., laborer, do. 

Brierly Mark, Jr. tinsmith, do. 

Brophy Matthew, laborer, do. 

Bridge Jeremiah, laborer, do. 

Budd Elijah, farmer, Carthage Landing. 

Budd William D. farmer, Matteawan. 

Budd Underhill, farmer, Carthage Landing. 

Budd Isaac S. farmer, do. 

Budd Gilbert, do. 



105 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Budd Jacob S. farmer, 

Burks James, 

Burks William, 

Burk Walter, laborer, 

Buckley John, calico printer, 

Buckley Thomas, laborer, 

Burton Ann, 

Burris John, laborer, 

Burhans Charles, wagon maker. 

Burns Daniel carpenter, 

Burns William, blacksmith, 

Burns James, carriage painter, 

Burns Edward, Flagman, H. R. B. R. 

Hush James E. laborer, 

Bush Thomas, teamster, 

Bush James, laborer, 

Bunn William, carver, 

Bump Mary, 

Bump Win. E. hatter, 

Bump Andrew, file cutter, 

Bump Deborah, 

Bump Barker, saloon, 

Bump E. H. saloon, 

Burnett Samuel, combmaker, 

Burnett Wm. J. cigar pedlar, 

Burnett Lavenia, dressmaker, 

Burnett John, carpenter, 

Burrough Cornelius, farmer, 

Burke John, machinist, 

Bull Joseph, bar tender, 

Buchanan Wm. P. machinist, 

Buchanan Thomas, laborer, 

Burrow John, farmer, 

Burrow John P. farm and nursery, 

Bulmar David, blacksmith, 

Burn Reuben, laborer, 

Butter Phiner, laborer, col'd, 

Putter John, laborer, col'd, 

( lallighan John, laborer, 

Carnes John, mason, 

Callighau James, laborer. 

Carswell G. IP Principal .Mountain-View Seminar 

Carrigan James, laborer, 

Carroll Daniel, 

Cassiday Henry, 

Cassiday Lawrence, 

Cassiday William, 

Carr John, teamster, 

( 'arver John, clerk, 

Carpenter Robert P. Seamless Clothing Company. 

Cant well William, file-grinder, 

Cary Thomas, fanner, 



Carthage Landing. 
Mat tea wan. 
do. 

Wappingers Palls. 
do- 
do. 
Glenham. 

n Eishkill Village. 

do. 
Eishkill Landing. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Wappimrers Palls. 

'do. 

Eishkill Landing. 

Matteawan. 

do. 
do. 

Eishkill Landing. 

do. 

Wappingers Palls. 

Glenham. 

Matteawan. 

Hugbsonville. 

n Fishkill Village 

do. 

do. 
Wappingers Falls. 

Glenham. 
n Fishkill Village. 
D do. 

New Hackensack. 
Wappingers Palls. 
Eishkill Village. 

do. 

Wappingers Palls. 

Eishkill Landing. 

Wappingers Palls. 

, Fishkill Landing. 

Glenham. 

Hnghsonville. 

Matteawan. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
do. 

do. 
do. 

u Eishkill Village. 



& UV SI 



3 



CARRIAGE & SLEIGH MAKERS, 

FISHKIL-L LANDING, N Y . 

All styles Carriages on hand or made to order. Repairing neatly done. 
SAMUEL SEWELL. JOHN SEWELL. 




CHARLES DUBOIS' NURSERY, 

^y^ FRUIT & EVERGREEN TREES, VINES, &c. 
50,000 Pear Trees, standard and dwarf. 

50,000 Arba Vita;, Norway, Spruce, Hemlock, &c. 

FISHKILL LANDING, N. Y. 

CHARLES DUBOIS. 



E. B. Foster, 
i in ysii nmiiin gimiii , 

Nos. 261 & 263 Main-St , Po'keepsie, N Y. 

GF* PI ease call and examine Specimens. 



H 
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BO 01 



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CO 

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Music, Magazines, Journals, Periodicals and all other Books, will 
be bound in good style to match any pattern, at New York Prices. 
Blank Books and Portfolios made to order at the shortest notice. 

]\I. RAPP. 



IHountiun-^mc 

DAY AND BOARDING SCHOOL, 

A limited number of pupils are received into 
the family of the principal, where they enjoy the 
comforts and parental care of home, while they 
have special advantages for study and improve- 
ment. Instruction thorough. Terms reasonable. 

For particulars address — 

G. II. CARSWELL, Principal. 

Smith & Green's 



NEW 



}#i#i#v 









M 



Near Broadway, 



NEW-YORK. 



Mr. Green extends a cordial invitation to his 
friends in Fishkill and elsewhere, to give him 
a call when in the city. 

NILES F. SMITH. JOHN P. GREEN. 



Jftta f, BcMmk* If, 



©, 



DRUGGIST & PHYSICIAN, 
Office arid Drug Store 

IX NEW BRICK BLOCK, XEAR THE POST OFFICE, 

MATTEAWAN, N. Y. 
Ipure Jruga, JJleditincs and <pcmitats. 

OFFICE HOURS— 7 to 9 a. m ; 4 to 6 p. m. 
SUXDAY HOURS— 8 to 10 a. m. ; 2 to 4 p. in. 



DOWN TOWN 1 

145 MAIN STREET, 

Between Bayeux and Bridge Streets, 

POUGHKEEPSIE. 

Goods shown with pleasure, and prices the very lowest. 

0. 8. A I 'KINS. 



4S& DANIEL SMITH, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

©®®k§, ^MwmsM&i S3 ©SOS, 

AND FANCY ARTICLES, 

at the lowest cash prices, 

77 WATEE STREET, TsTE-V^BTJE-G-EC, IST.Y. 

AND ORNAMENTAL PAINTING. 

Paper Hauging in all its branches, artistically done by 

WARE & McCUSTE, 

Present location, NO. 18 & 20 FIFTH STREET, 

^J" e x*r b it r g li , 3NJ" . "V . 
J. WARE. T. ICoOUNE. 




Li fifties' 1 <j.V Gentlemen's Ice Cream Saloon 

And general Restaurant, Fruit and Confectionery of all kinds. 

128^ Watee Street, Newbur&h, X. Y. 

Parties supplied with [ce Cream, Philadelphia Cream, Ices. Jellies, 
Charlotte Russe, Pyramids, Mottoes, Candies of all kinds, Boned Tur- 
key, &c, &c. Wholesale and Retail. 



PHOTOGRAPHS. 

Pope Brotlicrs, 
(Successors to D. T Lawrence.) 

Photographic Establishment, Washington Hall, 
«>>, «>7, «>!» A IOI Water St., Ifewburgh. 

The most Fashionable place ofresorl in Newbnrgh. 

First class work only produced. Every kind of 
Sun Picture made, from the Mammoth Photograph to the smallest 
Locket Melainotype. 




DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



lOfi 



Cary Isaac, farmer, 

Cary Richard B. merchant, 

Cary Samuel, carpenter, 

Campbell Edwin, hatter, 

Caldwell David D. machinist, 

Campbell James, laborer, 

Cahasky William, laborer, 

Cahasky Cornelius, laborer, 

Cass Kearn, laborer, 

Cash Charles, spinner, 

Carroll Daniel, H. R. R. R. 

Chambers David, baker, 

Charity Thomas, laborer, col'd, 

Chase Henry, fanner, 

Chase Alva, farmer, 

Chase Gilbert F. engineer on ferry, 

Chase Win. L. shoemaker, 

Chase Harvey, 

Chase Elvin, teacher, 

Chadburn George L. pattern maker, 

Chalmers Abigail, 

Charlock Isaac, farmer, 

Charlock Libbens, farmer, 

Charlock Caroline, 

Champlin Gibbons, 

Champlin George W. shoemaker, 

Champlin Hiram, livery, 

Cherry William, 

Cheatham John, calico printer, 

Churchill Henry, farmer, 

Churchill Caldwell D. grocf r, Fishkill Laudi»< 

Clapp Clinton W. fruit" grower, 

Clapp Benjamin, 

Clapp George W. farmer 

Clark James, teamster, 

Clark Patrick, laborer,- 

Clark Lawrence, laborer, 

Clark Barney, merchant, 

Clayton James, laborer, 

Clearwater tailor, 

Clearwater Joseph, laborer, 

Cleaver Mrs. teacher, 

Clifton John, painter, 

Coar Seth, 

Coar Joseph, mason, 

Cotton William, Aveaver, 

Cotheal Isaac E. farmer, 

Connover John P. farmer, 

Comiover Elisha, farmer, - 

Connover Dewitt, farmer, 

Congreve James M. physician, 

Connover Benjamin, farmer, 



near Fishkill Village 
do. 
Matteawan. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Wappingers Falls. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
New Hamburgh. 
Fishkill Landing. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Hughsonville. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing. 

do. 
n Fishkill Village. 
n do. 

Matteawan. 
Fishkill Village, 
do. 
do. 
Matteawan. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Matteawan. 
,(L. B. Ferguson & Co.) 
Wappingers Falls, 
"do. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Landing. 
' Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Landing. 

do 

Fishkill Village. 

do. 

Glenham. 

Fishkill Village. 

Hughsonville. 

New Hackensack. 

do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
do. 



107 



DIKI CTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Connover William, farmer, 

Connover Seymour, farmer, 

Connover Aaron, fanner, 

Cornell Stephen, farmer, 

Cornell Peter, farmer, 

Collins John B. laborer, col'd, 

Collins Thomas, laborer, 

Coldwell Thomas, grocer, 

Colchvell "Wm H. machinist, 

Conklin John, farmer, 

Conkliu Jacob V. B. farmer, 

Conklin James, grocer, 

Conklin Paulina, 

Conklin James E. tobacconist, 

Conklin Tunis, farmer, 

Conway Martin, mason, 

Conway Patrick, 

Cortney John, laborer, 

Couch W. S. 

Corcoran Thomas, shoemaker, 

Cooper Napoleon, farmer, 

Cuoper Amy, 

Cooper Benjamin, farmer, 

Cooper Mortimer C. grocer, 

Cooper Charles, 

Cooper Cornelius J. farmer, 

Cooper James A. hatter, 

Cooper John II. mason, 

Cooper Calvin, farmer, 

Cooper Tunis fanner, 

Colville Robert, weaver, 

Coleman Thomas, file forger, 

Coleman "William, pilot on ferry boat, 

Coleman Erastus, boatman, 

Coleman Blake W. Captain York River, 

Coleman John, with Brundage and Ladue, 

Conine Levered, hatter, 

Conine Abraham, miller, 

< !ole Norman, clerk, 

Cole William, comb maker, 

Cole Samuel, blacksmith, 

Cole Alonzo, blacksmith, 

Cole Caleb, blacksmith, 

Cole Jacob, butcher, 

( 'ole Gilbert, livery, 

Cole Henry, livery. 

Cole John, shoemaker. 

Coles Thomas, blacksmith, 

Courtney Howard, 

Cutter William B. mechanic, 

Coyle Rev. James, clergyman St. Joachim's 

Colwell Alexander, weaver, 



Wappingers Falls, 
do. 
do. 
New Haekensack. 

do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
do. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing. 
New Haekensack. 
New Haekensack. 
Matteawan. 
do. 
do. 
New Haekensack. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
n Fishkill Village, 
n do. 

Glenham. 
Fishkill Village. 
do. 
Glenham. 

Matteawan. 
Fishkill Lauding. 
Huirhsonville. 
' do 

Glenham. 

Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Matteawan. 
Hughsonville. 

Fishkill Village. 
Wappingers Fails. 

do. 

do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Wappingers Falls. 
church, ,M,ii lea wan. 

Wappingers falls. 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



108 



Cromwell Walter, farmer, 

Cromwell James, harness maker, 

Cromwell Mrs. Peter, farmer, 

Cromwell Charles, wool sorter, 

Cromwell Eliza, 

Cromwell Joseph, 

Cromwell J. Sebriug, 

Craft John J. cabinet maker, 

Creagan Anna, 

Crittie John, laborer, 

Cronkrite James, 

Cronkrite Abraham, carpenter, 

Croft William S. tailor, 

Crosier Marcus, farmer, 

Crosier Abraham, carpenter, 

Crosby Prince, laborer, col'd, 

Crosby Epenetus, (Smarter & Member, coal 

Crowther Ellen, milliner, 

Crowther James, wool sorter, 

Crowther Nelson, teamster, 

Crowther James W. 

Cramer Pbilip H. 

Cunliffe Henry, soap factory, 

Cunliffe Stephen, merchant, 

Cummings William, spooler, 

Culver Rev. A. L. clergyman M. E. church, 

Cunningham Matthew, gardener, 

Curry James, laborer, 

Culmley Wm. H. spinner, 

Cuhulev Daniel, wool washer, 

Davis Mrs. Wm. B. hotel, 

Davis David, merchant, 

Davis Mary A. saloon, 

Davis William, col'd, 

Dates Abraham, carpenter, 

Davies Charles, Prof. 

Davies Henry E. Judge Court of Appeals, 

Darrow Robert, machinist, 

Darroch Ellen, widow, 

Daniels Isaac, laborer, 

Daniels Gilbert, laborer, 

Daniels James, laborer, 

Daniels Levi, laborer, 

Darling D. 

Darling George E. 

Devenport William, laborer, 

Dean Willis, butcher, 

Dean Auna A. 

Dean Jackson W. cabinet maker, 

Dean James E. marble worker, 

Dean Phebe A. widow, 

Dean Helena, 



Glenham. 
Fishkill Village. 
Glenham. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do 
Matteawan. 
n Fishkill Village, 
n do. 

do. 

Glenham. 
Hughsonville. 
Fishkill Village, 
dealers) Fishkill Landing. 
Glenham. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls, 
"do. 
do. 
do. 
Fishkill Village 
Fishkill Landing, 
New Hackensack. 
Glenham. 
do. 
Fishkill Village. 
Matteawan. 
do. 
Fishkill Village. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
do. 
do. 
n Fishkill Village, 
n do. 

Matteawan. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Hughsonville. 
Fishkill Village, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Glenham. 



100 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Dean Matilda, milliner., 

Denning "Win. H. farmer, 

DeWint Arthur, farmer, 

DeWint John P. 

DeWint John, 

Delany Martin, laborer, 

DeLavergne Edward, millwright, 

Dermady Thomas, 

Devereaux Thomas, laborer, 

1 >essecker Peter, shoemaker, 

Decker Amos, blacksmith, Church street, 

Deacon William, engineer, 

Dernpsy John, laborer, 

Dearin James, teacher, 

Dearin W. H. station agent, 

Delily David, col'd, 

Delily Isaac, col'd, 

Demund Samuel, laborer, col'd, 

Demund James H. col'd, 

DeGrott William, laborer, 

Dingee Joseph M. farmer, 

Dingee John, laborer, 

Dixon Sarah, 

Dis'^row Emeline, 

Disbrow Nicholas U. foundry, 

Dietrich Maurice E. jeweler, 

Dimon Charles, 

Dimp-y fm. 

Diddell Joseph J. farmer. 

Dickson Clara, col'd, 

Dickson Anthony, laborer, col'd, 

Dougherty Hugh B. iron founder, 

Dolson John, teamster for Tioronda Mills, 

Dolson Alonzo, foundryman, 

Doxey Edwin, farmer, 

Doxey ¥111. farmer, 

Doxey Lumau, laborer, 

Dotzert George H. tailor, 

Doolittle Charles W. carpenter, 

Doolittle Francis, physician, 

Doolittle Rev. Horace D. Baptist clergyman, 

Dowling William, 

Dorland Mathew, 

Dorland Samuel P. merchant, 

Dotcrich John, 

Doty Harriet, widow. 

Downs Edward, machinist, 

Downs James, machinist, Fishkill Landing, 

Dugon Alary, 

Dugon Charles, laborer, 

Dudley Alexander, miller, 

Dudley William S. farmer, 



Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Hughsonville. 
Glenham. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Village. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Village, 
do. 
Carthage Landing. 
Fishkill Village. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Fishkill Village. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Myer'a Comer. 
New Hackensack. 
Fishkill Village. 
Wappingers Falls. 
do. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
do. 
New Hackensack. 
Fishkill Village, 
do 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Hughsonville. 
' do. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

Wapping&s Falls. 

do. 

Xew Eamburgh. 

New Hackensack. 

Hughsonville. 

Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan. 
works in Newburgh. 
Fishkill Village. 
n do. 

n do. 

do. 



DIRECTORY OF FISH KILL. 



110 



Duncan Rev. Henry E. Episcopal clergyman, Matteawan 

Duncan George, spinner, Wappingers Palls. 

Butcher Jefferson, cigar maker, Glenham. 

Butcher Garrett, laborer, Wappingers Falls. 

Butcher Isaac, boatman, do 

Butcher James, boatman, do. 

Bunham ffra. W. carpenter, Pishkill Landing. 

Dubois Mrs. M. E. farmer, Glenham. 

Dubois James, carriage maker, Fishkill Landing 

Dubois John, farmer, do. 

Dubois Peter C. farmer, do. 

Dubois DeWitt, farmer, do. 

Dubois Charles, nurseyman, do. 

Dubois John, merchant, "Wappingers Falls. 

Buwon Daniel, carpenter, Fishkill Landing, 

Dumphv Edward, do. 

Dumphy John, gardener, do. 

BufTee Bridget, widow, Matteawan. 

Dyson Samuel, miller, Wappingers Palls. 

Dyson Joseph, mason, do. 

Dyson John, laborer, do. 

Eaton Thomas, laborer, col'd, Fishkill Village, 

Eaton Ephraim, spinner, Glenham. 

Edwards Anthony, carpenter, Fishkill Village. 

Edmonds William, hatter, Matteawan. 

Elsden Robert F. do. 

Ellis John, file forger, ■ do. 

Emily James, hatter, do. 

Emigh Ward, lawyer, Pishkill Village. 

Emigh Morgan, farmer, n do. 

Emigh Jarvis, ( 1o. 

Emigh William, laborer, do. 

Erwin John, gardener, Hughsonville. 

Evans George W. Matteawan. 

Evans Buel, hat works, do. 

Faulkner Joseph, jun. Faulkner's Mills, Wappingers Falls. 

Faulkner Joseph, manager print works, do. 

Faulkner Joseph, engraver, do. 

Farnum Amos, comb maker, do. 

Parrell Thomas, laborer, do. 

Farrell Michael, laborer, do." 

Parrel] Thomas, carpenter, Hughsonville, 

Pay Eliza, Matteawan 

J agan Michael, file maker, do. 

Parmer Patrick, laborer, Pishkill Landing. 

Famngton Stephen, hatter, Matteawan. 

Featherston T. J. hatter, do. 

Ferrell James, cigar maker, do. 

Feherty Lawrence, laborer, Fishkill Landing. 

Perdon Charles A. shoemaker, Hughsonville 

Ferguson Adam, Glenham. 

Ferguson L. B. grocer, (L. B. Ferguson & Co.,) Pishkill Landing. 



Ill 



DIRKCTOKY OF FISHKILL. 



Ferguson Alexander, cotton dresser, 

rishkill Landing Machine Co., 

Flagler Stephen E. 

Flagler Frank L. 

Flagler John P. farmer, 

Feherty John, 

Foster Caleh, combmaker, 

Formau Mrs. Lawrence S. 

Foshay J. Thomas, printer, 

Forbus Robert, laborer, 

Fogg Frances, widow, 

Fogg Samuel, laborer, 

Fowler Milton A. lawyer, asst. assesor, 

Freeman Margaret, eol'd, 

Frost Reuben, teamster, 

Fuller Josiah, fanner, 

Fulliner John, laborer, 

Gannon George, laborer, 

Gannon, widow, 

Gage Horatio IS", merchant, 

Ganse Nicholas J. farmer, 

Gardner Sarah, 

Garrison William H. farmer, 

Garrison Davis, fireman ferry boat, 

Garrison Milton, blacksmith, 

Garrison Wm. H.jun., Matteawau Hat 

Garrison Phebe, 

Gaunt Henry, teacher, 

Garrigan Mtirty, laborer, 

Garnon John, calico printer. 

Gerrard John H. 

Gee Uriah D. 

Germond Gilbert, , 

Germond John, 

Germond James, 

Germond Walter C. laborer, 

Gerow Alfred, laborer, 

Gerow Elias, butcher, 

Gerow John P. mason, 

Gerow Daniel, butcher, 

Gildersleve George, blacksmith, 

Gildersleve Mahala, 

Gildersleve James W. carpenter, 

Gildersleve ¥m. II. baker, 

Gibbon Charles, 

Gilbert Thomas, gigger in factor}-, 

Gilberl Isaac, gardener, 

Ginnell James M. shoemaker, 

Gitchell Delos W. ( Whipple & Gitchell 

Giles John M. machinist, 

Given Sarah, 

Given Lavmia, 



Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Landing, (See adv.) 
Fisiikil! Village. 
do. 
Xew Hackensack. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Matt ea wan. 
Fishkill Landing. 
"Wappingers Falls. 
do. 
do. 
Fishkill Village, 
do. 
Matteawan. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Xew Hackensack. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
Works. Matteawan. 

do. 

Glenham. 
Wappingers Palls, 
do. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan. 
do. 

do. 

Xew Hackensack. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan. 
do. 

do. 

Glenham. 

do. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
Wappingers Palls. 
Glenham. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Matteawan. 
,) hat factory, do. 

do. 

Fishkill Village, 
do. 



THE FISHKIIJLi LANDING 



Ml |i llllflil 






f®il|l| V B 



FISHKILL LANDING, 

Near Depot of Hudson River Railroad, 
DUTCHESS CO., N. Y., 

MANCFACTURERS OF 

MARINE AND STATIONARY 



iOlLERS 



HIGH AXD LOW PRESSURE, OF ALL KINDS, 

mxwm i Htoira ikiiii, 

MACHINERY FOR BLAST FURNACES, 

1" 



PORTABLE AND STATIONARY, 

COMPLETE MACHINERY FOR FLOURING MILLS, 
SUGAR MILLS. &c. 

ALSO, Mill GEARING, SHAFTING, HANG- 
EHS t PUlUfcS, &6. 

IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS. 



MILO SAGE, President. 



113 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Gillespie A. 0. 

Gilmer Catharine, 

Glermon Thomas, laborer, 

Glass George, seaman, 

Gladd Tryphenia, widow, 

Glover Abraham, teamster, 

Glover T. 

Goring Edward M. coal dealer, 

Goring John M. engraver, 

Goring Walter H. carpenter, 

Gould Robert, farmer, col'd, 

Gould John B. laborer, 

Gomar James, eoahman, col'd, 

Gordon John W. harness maker, 

Green Elizabeth, 

Green Eliza, 

Greeu Abraham, carpenter, 

Green Alpheus, 

Green William R. moulder, 

Green Joseph I. 

Greeu William H. painter, 

Green William, tailor. 

Green Henry, machinist, 

Green Edgar, machinist, 

Greeu Daniel, livery and constable, 

Green Washington, machinist, 

Green Jeremiah, hotel, 

Green William, file cutter, 

Green James S. fanner, 

Graham John, farmer, 

Grev Amelia, 

Griffin Albert W. laborer, 

Griffin John 1ST. tinsmith, 

Griffin Caroline, 

Griffin Margaret, 

Griffin George, carpenter, 

Griffin George P. hatter, 

Grady John, laborer, H. R. R. 

Grady Philip, engineer, 

Greer Robert, machinist, 

Grant ('. batter, 

Grant Nathaniel, laborer, 

Grant James C. hatter, 

Gregory Eratus, machinist, 

Gregg Richard, farmer, 

Gutgesell Conrad, silver plater, store 

EawkeS Samuel A . laborer, 

Eawkes Daniel, engineer, 

Hawkes Andrew, laborer, 

Hawkes Charles, halter, 

Hawkes David, carpenter, 

Havens Joseph F. Farmer, 



Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

do. 

Carthage Landing. 

Wappingers Falls. 

Fishkill Landing. 

do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
do. 
do. 
Fishkill Village. 
Glenham. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Fishkill Tillage. 
Glenham. 
do. 
do. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
Hughsonville. 
do 
Wappingers Falls. 
New Hackensack. 
Fishkill Village. 

do 
Hughsonville. 
do 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan. 
do 
do 
Xew Hackensack. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Myer's Corner. 
Newburgh, ' Matteawan. 

Fishkill Village. 
Glenham. 
Fishkill Village. 
Matteawan. 
do 
near Fishkill Village. 



•AKLBY ®«§M ; 



And Dealer in Roofing Material, 
Opposite the Hudson River Railroad Passenger Depot, 

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 

Roofs Covered -with Slate, Tin, Plastic Slate and Gravel Roofing. 

ALL WORK W&RElANiTE©. 

Edward A. Kichards, M. D., 

The most distinguished ad- 
ministrator of Aboriginal medi- 
cines in this country. His Cough 
Balsam, Blood Renovator, 
Stomach Bitters, Liquid Cath- 
artic, Nerve Drops and Cholera 
Drops, are probably the best re- 
medies known at the present 
day. 

HE HAS NO AGENTS, 

# Therefore the pure aboriginal 

sl|$f medicines can only be obtained 

at his old established office, 

No. 18 Cannon Street, 

POTTGHKEEPSIE, X. Y. 

WILLIAM HARLOE, 




POUGHKEEPSIE, N . Y . 

THE UNION WHEEUABBOW MMPAKY, 

are prepared to furnish a superior article of 

CAMI, ttlBSl i «M1 BIlSfR, 

either in quantities packed for shipping, or for home consumption, 

AT THE LOWEST MARKET PRICES. 

All orders will receive prompt attention. 

~\7S7' i 1 1 1 <n -xxx H £x x- 1 o o , Agent, 

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 



THE riSKKILL JOURNAL 

IS PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING, 

IN THE VILLAGE OF FISHKILL, N. Y., 

AT $1.50 A YEAR, m AiOVAMCSi, 

IT IS AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER, ESPECIAL- 
LY DEVOTED TO THE LOCAL INTERESTS 
OF SOUTHERN DUTCHESS. HAVING 
A CENTRAL LOCATION IN ONE OP 
THE RICHEST FARMING RE- 
GIONS OF THE STATE, 
AND A LARGE AND INCREASING CIRCULATION, 
THE ATTENTION OF BUSINESS MEN IS 
CALLED TO ITS VALUE AS AN 
ADVERTISING MEDIUM. 

ALL IvIHSTDS OW 

JoTd Printing 

executed at reasonable rates, and in the neatest manner. 

G. W. OWEN, Editor and Proprietor. 

a b 8 Mil, Miss ¥iffli«, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

Bureaus, Chairs, Sofas, Lounges, Looking Glasses, 

Bedsteads, Picture Frames, Cord, Window Class, &c. 

Wndertalumj attended ta Jn the best manner. 

Rosewood, Walnut, & Metallic Caskets. 
Rosewood, Cloth, Mahogany and other Coffins. 

mmim %mmM> Gk&Yss, 

and every article required at the interment of the 
dead, always kept on hand. 

Interments procured in the Fishkill Rural Ceme- 
tery, at short notice. 



•3 

(Successor to G. W. FARRINGTOX S( CO.,) 

Q>6(5 Main street, Poughkc 3psie> 

IMPORTER AND DEALER IN 

iiiii f glass, in iiniEiffiii® 

TABLE CUTLERY, 

Gas Fixtures, Kerosene Lamps, 
SILVER-PLATED WARE, 

HOUSEKEEPING GOODS 

I3NT GKR,E.A.T ^V^.PtIET^T. 



Constantly on hand the largest stock of Goods in our line, between 
New- York and Albany, and for sale at less than 1ST. T. Prices. 

COUNTRY MERCHANTS 



"Will do well to examine our stock and prices before purchasing else- 
where. We import our goods direct — sell for less than New York 
jobbiflg houses, and make no charge for packing. 

LOOKING-GLASSES, 

"With Plain aud Ornamental Frames, all sizes and styles, on hand 
or made to order. 

Oval & Square Photograph Frames. 

PARTICULAR ATTENTION PAID TO 

Picture Framing. 

PICTURE CORD AND TASSELS, WINDOW AND PICTURE GLASS, ETC. 



GAS FIXTURES BRONZED AND RE GILT. 



Importer of 

*%fAina ? J^E&t&i ant/ JM'letiuYe finale , 

Looking Glasses and House Furnishing Goods, 

LAMPS, KBROSEMS OIL, 

Gas and Steam Fitting in all its branches. 

347 91ain-St , - - Poushkeepsie. 

NEAT. QUICK. CHEAP. 

S AMU EL McKEE, 

^iujicntct and IhtiltUt, 

55 MBS&M STREET, 
Corner of Western Avenue, - NEWBURGH. 

All kinds of work in his line entrusted to him, 
will be promptly attended to & satisfaction given. 



CARPETS! CARPETS! 

JAMES "W. MILLER 



DKAI,KR IN 



MATTING-, WINDOW SHADES, 

Looking Glasses and Looking Glass Plates, 

25) Water Street, Newbnrgh. 

(Nearly opposite the Highland Bank.) 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



11-1 



Hardenburgh George B. farmer, New Haekensaek. 

Hayt Samuel A. merchant and Pres. of National "bank Fishkill Village. 



Hayt Catharine L 

Hayt Samuel A. jun. student, 

Hayt Lucius X . farmer, 

Hallowell William, machinist, 

Hasbrook Zachariah V. farmer, 

Hasbrook William, Capt. of boat, 

Hasbrook Francis J. shoemaker, 

Hasbrook Isaac V. A. shoemaker, 

Hasbrook Alfred, hotel, 

Hasbrook Alfred S. merchant, 

llaight Samuel, farmer, 

Haight Joseph I. laborer, 

Eaight George, farmer, 

Haight James, farmer, 

Haight Jacob, farmer, 

Haight Joseph S . laborer, 

Haight John, 

Haight John C. farmer, 

Haight James C. farmer, 

Haight William H. farmer, 

Haight Sylvanus, farmer, 

Harcourt Joseph, merchant, 

Hart Jacob, farmer, 

Hanson Nelson, laborer, 

Hanson Frank H. soap and candle factory 

Hanson Noah, do do do 

Hall James A. teamster, 

Hall George, teamster, 

Hall Benjamin, carpenter, 

Hall Mrs. Louisa, widow, 

Hall Thomas, hurdle maker, 

Hall Margaret, widow, Byrnesville, 

Hara Peter, farmer, 

Harris Samuel, hatter, 

Harris William C. painter, Pishkill Landing, residence, 

Harris William, machinist, 

Harris Howard H. machinist, 

Harris John P. machinist, 

Hanmore Elsie, 

Hayes Samuel, painter, 

Hayes Daniel P. laborer, 

Hazzard James H. ferry boat, 

Harrison Miss H. 

Hatch Eleazar R. boot aud shoe store, 

Hatch James, carriage trimmer, 

Hancock John, 

Hagadon J. H. farmer, 

Hannah Mary, 

Hannah James, laborer, 

Hayser Jacob, laborer, 



do 
do 
do 
Wappingers Falls. 
Hughsonville. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
n Fishkill Yillage. 
n do 

n do 

n do 

n do 

n do 

do 
n do 

Wappingers Falls. 
near Pishkill Yillage. 
n do 

Wappingers Falls - 
Carthage Landing. 
Pishkill Landiug. 
do. 
do. 
Fishkill Yillage. 
Matteawan. 
do 
Fishkill Landing, 
do 
do 
do 
Matteawan. 
do 
do 
Fishkill Landing. 
do 
do 
Wappingers Falls. 

do 
Pishkill Lauding, 
do 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan. 
New Haekensaek. 
Wappingers Falls. 
do 
do 



115 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL 



Hani John, laborer, 

Hamlin Hugh 0. laborer, 

Ballowell William H. dyer, 

Heroy J. J. pattern maker, 

Heroy Melancthon, shoemaker, 

Herman George, teamster, 

Hedges Charles, carpenter, 

Henry William, engineer, 

Hellerieh Henry, gardener, 

Heald John, laborer, 

Hind John, laborer, 

Higgs James, laborer, 

Higu r s Julia, 

Eiggs John, laborer, 

Eiggs Benjamin, laborer, 

Higgs Anson, laborer, 

Higgs Andrew, shoemaker, 

Higgs Thomas, 

Hine Ralph D. Seamless Clothing Manuf. Co. 

Hickman Isaac, teamster. 

Eiggins James, piano maker, 

Hicks Stephen, tanner, 

Hicks Harvey, laborer, 

Hitcbcock Simeon, laborer, 

Hilliker Diana, dress maker, 

Hilliker Nathaniel, farmer, 

Hilliker Sampson, tanner, 

Hickey John, laborer, 

Hignall Daniel L. blacksmith, 

Uignall Cornelius W. tailor, 

J I i ltd ; 1 1 1 Dayton, laborer, 

Illanke Lewis, 

Horton Brastus, livery, 

Eorton William M. livery, 

Eorton Rev. Francis, clergyman, Ref. [bitch ( 

Eorton William II. wool sorter, 

Eorton Richard B. farmer. 

Hoard John, tile grinder, 

Hookey Edward L. silversmith, 

Howland Joseph, State Treasurer, 

Eoagland Win. V. C. tanner, 

Eorricks John, painter, 

Ilostield William, farmer, 

liny Michael, laborer, 

Howell Daniel Y. boatman, 

Eopper dames A. painter, 

Eopper Nicholas, painter, 

Eopper Cornelius, shoemaker, 

Hopkins Jeremiah, farmer, 

Hopkins Basil, shoemaker, 

Hoyt Seth S. fanner, 

Hoyt John X. fanner, 



Wappingers Falls. 

"do 

do 

Fishkill Landing. 

do 

Glenham. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Village. 
Glenham. 
do. 
near Fishkill Village. 
Glenham. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 

New Hackensack. 
do. 

do. 

Glenham. 

do. 
do. 

Fishkill Landing, 
do. 

Wappingers falls. 

'do. 

do. 
Fishkill Village. 
do. 
Jhurch, Glenham 

Matteawan 

Carthage Landing 

Matteawan 

Fishkill Village 

Matteawan 

Wappingers Fal' 

Fishkill Landing 

do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

do. 

do. 

Carl hag- Landing 
Myer's Corner 
near do. 



DIRECTORY OF FISH KILT,. 



llfi 



Hoyt William, farmer, 
Hoyt Heuiy, carpenter, 
Hoyt Jerome, farmer, 
Howartb, widow, 
Howarth Richard, laborer, 
Howe Lebbeue, laborer, 
Howe Robert J. blacksmith, 
Howe George L. constable, 
How Mary, 

Hoffman Andrew, elotbier, 
Houghton George W. 
Hopkins Thomas, laborer, 
Jlultz Gilbert, teamster, 
Hurlbert Albert, batter, 
Hubbell Joseph, merchant, 
Hughes William, mason, 
Hunt Alva, carpenter, 
Hunt James, laborer, 
Hunt Theodore A. cigar maker, 
Hunt Charles P. carpenter, 
Hunt Peter H mason, 
Hughson Augustus, tinsmith, 
Hughson William E. tinsmith, 
Hughson Phebe 8. 
Hughson Edward, comb maker, 
Hughson Stephen, farmer, 
Hughson John J. 
Hughson Henry, miller, 
Hughson William I. farmer, 
Hunter John, calico printer, 
Hustis Henry H. lawyer, 
Hustis Mary, 
Hustis Elizabeth, 
Hustis Mary A. widow, 
Hustis Nicholas P>. butcher, 
Hustis Josiah, farmer, 
Ireland James, moulder, 
Ireland Albert E. laborer, 
Ireland George, laborer, 
Ives William, hatter, 
Ivory John, laborer, 
Jackson Charles A. fanner, 
Jackson William, wagon maker, 
Jackson Alexander 
Jackson Andrew, mason, 
Jackson Eliza, col'd, 
Jackson Francis I. teacher, 
Jaycox John, tabacconist, 
Jaycox Joseph, col'd, 
Jaycox Cornelius, col'd, 
Jacklin John H. col'd, 
Jagger William, carpenter, 



Hughsonville, 
Wappingers Falls. 
Hughsonville. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkfll Tillage. 
do. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Pisbkill Tillage, 
Hatteawan. 
do. 
Pisbkill Landing. 
Glenliam. 
Fishkill Landing. 
do. 
Carthage Landing, 
do. 
Fishkill Tillage, 
do. 
Hughsonville. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Hughsonville. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Hughsonville. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Landing. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

Glenbam. 

near Fishkill Tillage. 

Fishkill Landing 

Matteawau. 

do. 

do. 

Fishkill Landing. 

Fishkill Tillage. 

Matteawan. 

do. 

Hughsonville. 

near Fishkill Tillage. 

Hughsonville. 

Glenbam. 

Fishkill Tillage. 

Fishkill Landing. 

near Fishkill Tillage. 

Fishkill Landing. 



117 



DIEKCTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Janson Mairon, clerk, 
Jewell William H. hotel, 
Jefferson Yarkin, col'd, 
Johnson Jacob, col'd, 
Johnson Jacob col'd, laborer, 
Johnson William, calico printer, 
Johnson Alexander, farmer, 
Johnson Mary, 

Johnson James, calico printer, 
Jones John B. tanner, 
Jones Zopher J. blacksmith, 
Jones John, farmer, 
Jones John, col'd, 
.(ones Samuel P. col'd, 
Jones John AY. 
Jones Thomas, mason, 
Jones James, teamster, 
Jones Hubert, mason, 
Jones Henry G. hat finisher, 
Jones William, laborer, 
Jones John, laborer, 
Judson Thomas. Wiccopee, 

Kay Moses M. spinner, 

Kay James, bleacher, 

Kampf Stephen, laborer, 

Kelly Patrick, laborer, 

Kelly John, laborer, 

Kelly Martin, laborer, 

Kelly James, laborer, 

Kelly William, bo ;ket maker, 

Kelly Edward, mason, 

Kelly David, 

Kelly Patrick, expressman, 

Kelly John, dyer, 

Kit ■ham Susan, 

Ketcham Theodore, 

Ketcham Lydia, 

Kennedy Pa1 rick, coachman, 

Kennedy Patrick, machinist, 

Kcnian Hugh, laborer, 

Kernan Thomas, laborer, 

Kernan John, laborer, 

Keane William, carl man, 

Kerne Joseph, carpenter, 

Kent James, lawyer, 

Kip Per. Francis M. clergyman, Ref. 

i\ ip P. M. jun. student, 

Kip Harriet P.. 

Kip Sarah M. 

Kinney Thomas, laborer, 

Kipp Cornelius B. machinist, 

King James, weaver, 



Fishkill Landing. 
Hughsonville. 
Fishkill Village. 
near Fishkill Tillage. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Wappingers Falls. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
near Myer's Corner, 
n do. 

New Hackensaek. 
Fishkill Landing. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
Hughsonville. 
Wappingers Palls. 
Matteawan. 
Wappingers Palls. 
do. 

Glenham. 
do. 
do. 
do 

do. 

Fishkill Yillage. 

Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

do. 

Wappingers Falls. 

Glenham. 

near Fishkill Landing 

Wappingers Falls. 

Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

do. 
do. 
do. 

Glenham. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
Dutch church, Fishkill Village, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do 
Matteawan. 
Glenham. 



DIRECTORY OF FIPIIKILI>. 



US 



King Maria B. 
Knapp James II farmer, 
Knrpp William, Carpenter, 
Knapp John, laborer, 
Knapp Gilbert, farmer, 
Kaapp EfifFc J. farmer, 
Knapp Harrison, laborer, 
Knapp Charles E. fanner, 
Knapp Job, fanner, 
Knapp Israel, farmer, 
Knapp David H. horsedealer, 
Knevels Isaac A. 
I- levels A. V. 
Kniflin John L. grocer, 
Kniffin Jacob, teamster, 
Knickel Joseph, tailor, 
Kunx Starr B. miller, 
Kuhn Fred jeweler, 

Kuhn shoemaker, 

Kyle John, gardener, 

La:l ne Robert J. fanner, 

Ladne Abraham, sexton, 

Ladue Cornelius S. farmer, 

Ladne James 0. laborer, 

Ladue John X. freighting, (Brundage 

Ladue Isaac, mason, 

Li due Oliver, mason, 

Ladne Garrett, teamster, 

Ladue John, carpenter, 

Ladue Lewis IT. carpenter, 

Ladue Charles H. wagon maker, 

La Forge Phebe, dressmaker, 

LaForge Jane, dressmaker, 

LaForge Benjamin, machinist, 

Lamar Alfred, cigar maker, 

Lane Nathan, shoemaker, 

Lane Benson, farmer, 

Lane William, blacksmith, 

Lane Abraham, teamster, 

Lane John, assistant engineer, 

Latin Amos, hatter, 

Laubenheimer Valentine, barber, 

Laughren Ferdinand, hatter, 

Lawrence Thomas, laborer, 

Lawson Francis X. farmer, 

Lawson Smith, farmer, 

Lawson Bradley \Y. farmer, 

Lawson Melissa A. 

Leach Daniel, painter, 

Leach Dennis, calico printer, 

Leach John L. moulder, 

Leach Richard, laborer, 



Matteawan. 
near Fishkiil Village. 
Glenham. 
near Fishkiil Village. 
u do. 

do. 
do. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkiil Landing, 
do. 
Wappingers Falls, 
near Fishkiil Lauding, 
do. 
Fishkiil Villas; e. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Carthage Landing. 
Matteawan. 
do. 
Fishkiil Landing. 
New Hackensack. 
Fishkiil Village. 
n do. 

do. 
& Ladue,) do. 

Matteawan. 

do. 

Fishkiil Landing. 

do. 

do. 

"Wappingers Falls. 

Fishkiil Landing. 

do. 

do. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkiil Village. 
near do. 

Matteawan. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
New Hackensack. 

do. 
Wappingers Falls. 

do. 
Fishkiil Landing. 
W r appingers Falls. 

do. 
n do. 



119 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Leak Owen, carriage painter, 

Leith Samuel, butcher, 

Lee Margaret, 

Leuzie William, fuller, 

Lester H. M. tailor, 

Lester Thomas S. tailor, 

Levitt Fred. 

Light John, farmer, 

Light William, driver, 

land E. G. coppersmith. 

Livermore Joseph W. laborer, 

Livingston, Rev. John R. Episcopal clergyman, 

Livingston Charles, col'd, 

Livingston Richard M. 

Lockwood John II. coal burner, 

Lockwood J. E. hatter, 

Lomas Diana, 

Lomas Mary E3. 

Lomas Joseph, briekmaker, 

Losee Peter laborer, 

Louudsburv John, farmer, 

Lonsbinv Maik D. boatman, 

Lozier Oliver, Captain on ferry boat, 

Lucas Harvey, farmer, 

Luckey Robert, 

Lucas James, farmer, 

Lucas (liarles, farmer, 

Luther Amos A. grocer, 

Luyster Matthew, farmer, 

Luyster I']. B. laborer, 

.'lackey Charles, laborer, 

Mackay Alexander R. ticket agent, II. K. 1 

Mackey Amanda, widow. 

Mackin James, agent, 

Magin John, laborer, 

Mahurter Mark, laborer, 

Mahon Thomas, laborer, 

.Malady Thomas, laborer, 

Mallon Thomas, rubber shop, Wiccopee, 

Manning Hiram A. 

Manning It. farmer, 

Manning David, fanner. 

Manning Jacob, boot maker, 

Mm 1 1 11 Michael, laborer, 

Mapes Stephen, apothecary and dentist. 

Mapes Mrs. boarding house, 

Maroney Wm. II. laborer, 

Martin Charles E. clerk, (W. Teller & Co.,) 

Martin .John, laborer, 

Marston Francis, spinner, 

Marsh Zachariah, cigar maker. 

Marsh Samuel, tobacconist, 



Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

Matteawan. 

Grlenham. 

Pishkill Landing. 

do. 

do. 

near Pishkill Village. 

do. 

Matteawan. 

New Hackensack. 

(ileuham. 

Pishkill Landing. 

Wappingers Falls. 

near New Hackensack. 

Matteawan. 

Fishkill Village. 

do. 

Fishkill Landing. 

near Fishkill Village. 

Carthfge Landing. 

Matteawan. 

Fishkill Landing. 

Matteawan. 

Ilnghsoiiville. 

Matteawan. 

do. 

Matteawan. 

N'cw Hackensack. 

Fishkill Village 

Glenham. 

fishkill Landing. 

Wappingers falls. 

Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

do. 

Fishkill Village. 

fishkill Landing. 

Matteawan. 

near Fishkill Village. 

Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Landing. 

do. 
do. 

Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Landing. 
do. 

Grlenham. 
Glenham. 
do. 



DIRECTORY OF FIS1IKILL, 



120 



Masters Rev. Francis R. Presbyterian clergyman 

Mastison fm. clerk with S. Mapes, 

Mase Johu, hatter, 

Mase Lyman, hatter, 

Alase Sylvester, carder, 

Mase Willard H. hatter, 

Mase A. hatter, 

Mathers Thomas, tinsmith, 

McAuley Catherine, 

McBride Michael, tailor, 

McCarty James, hatter, 

McCaudry Ellen. 

McCord Robert, tea dealer, 

McCreary John M. machinist, 

McCreary Thomas, moulder, 

McCreary William, moulder, 

McCrossen Mary A. 

McDowell Andrew, weaver, 

McDowell John, machinist, 

MeFarlau Jobn, dyer, 

McGee Hugh, laborer, 

McGregor John F. machinist, 

McGregor John, carpenter, 

McGregor Peter, photographer, 

McGrath Edward, shoemaker, 

McHugh James, teacher, 

Mclllrath Alexander, gardener, 

McKee Hugh, blacksmith, 

McKeel Reuben, farmer, 

Ale Reel Isaac, farmer, 

McKinley James, 

McKinley Mary L. 

McKinley Daniel, cotton manufacturer, 

McKin James, currier, 

Ale Kin Thomas, carpenter, 

McKue Owen, gardener, 

McLaughlin William, blacksmith, 

McLaughlin David S. tobacconist, 

McLaughlin Frank, cigar pedlar, 

McMasters George, farmer, 

McAlannius James, 

AlcXarv Isaac, gas maker, 



Matteawan, 
Fishkill Landing, 
Matteawan. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
do. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Lauding, 
do. 
Matteawan. 
do, 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Glenham. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Village. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill landing. 
Matteawan. 
Xew Hackensack. 
Fishkill Village. 
Wappingers Falls, 
do. 
do. 
Matteawan. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan 
Fishkill Landing. 
do. 
near Fishkill Village. 
Carthage Landing. 
Fishkill Village, 



Mead Harvey, laborer, near Xew Hackensack. 

Meeks John L. shoemaker, Fishkill Village. 

Meeker William, machinist, Fibhkill Landing. 

Mosher Joshua, moulder, Fishkill Landing. 

Member James E. grocer, oyster and ice cream saloon, do. 

Member George A. clerk, ' do. 

Menzies William, Fishkill Village. 

Merritt William H. Fishkill Landing. 

Metcalf Edward, Glenham. 

Meyers Edward, carnage maker, Fishkill Landing. 



121 



DIRKCTORY OF FISHKTLL. 



Mezier Henry, farmer, 

Mezier Abraham S. farmer, 

Miller George, laborer, 

Miller Thomas J. farmer, 

Miller Hugh, laborer, 

Miller Alfred, farmer, 

Miller Wm. II. blacksmith, 

Miller William, machinist, 

Miller George, machinist, 

Milliken Samuel, 

Milliken David, cigar maker, 

Mills Nathaniel, shoemaker, 

Minot William, hatter, 

Mitehell John, blacksmith, 

Mitchell Thomas, machinist, 

Moith Theodore A. chemist and apothecary, 

Montross Eveline, 

Monell John J. lawyer, 

Morgan James E. 

Monfort Helen, 

Monfort John, farmer, 

Monfort Stephen P. carpenter, 

Monfort Schenek, farmer, 

Monfort Peter V. W. farmer, 

Monfort John B. justice of the peace, 

Monfort Henry, farmer, 

Monfort William, pattern maker, 

Monfort Stephen, file cutter 

Monfort Samuel F. comb maker, 

Moore Gilbert X. hatter, 

Moore DeLoss L. hatter, 

Moore James, tin pedlar, 

Moon Joseph, laborer, 

Morgan John, 

Morris John, 

Morris Cornelius, carpenter, 

Morse George W. farmer, 

Morse .lames II. fanner, 

Morse James, farmer, 

Morse Henry B. 

Mosher Lewis, teamster, 

Mosher John C. laborer, 

Mosher Samuel, laborer, 

Mosher William 11. teamster, 

Mosher Washington, 

MosherTlatt, farmer, 

Mosher Miles, 

.Mosher Augustas, laborer. 

Mosher Amos, laborer, 

Moses Robert, 

Molt William B. farmer, 

Mott Morgan L. sen. 



Wappingers Falls, 
do. 
do. 
near Fishkill Village. 
Glenham. 
near Fishkill Village. 
Matteawan. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Hughsouville. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Village. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
Fishkill Village. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan. 
Myer's Corner. 
n do. 

New Hackensack. 
near Myer's Corner, 
n do. 

Fishkill Village. 
Glenham. 
Matteawan. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Matteawan. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Landing, 
near Fishkill Village. 
Glenham. 
Matteawan. 
near New Eackensack. 
near Fishkill Village, 
n ilo. 

do. 
do. 
n do. 

n do. 

Fishkill Landing- 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Wappingers falls. 
New Hackensack. 
do. 



7S/L illinery <3r o o ci s» , 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

Ladies' Dress Caps, Head-Dresses, Flowers, Ribbons, and Blonds, 
Embroideries and Laces, in great variety. 

A LARGE STOCK OMjOSIERY & GLOVES. 

A FULL LINE~OF FANCY/ GOODS AND TANKEE NOTIONS. 

MRS. M. PETERKIN, 

330 MAIN STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE. 

IEL,S@I & G@., 
9 1 a 1ft a IF i IB s id . is a jl- bibs, 

AND GENERAL UNDERTAKERS, 
S'Z'Z AXaizi Street, r»ougb.b.eepsie. 

e®* Wholesale and Retail. 



J. N, & 6. W. CAME & DO,, 

POPULAR ONE PRICE STORE. 

Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Dry Goods. 

MANUFACTURERS OF CLOAKS f MANTILLAS, 
316 Main Street, - - - POUGHKEEPSIE, N, Y, 

OUR MOTTO = 

One price to all, and equal value for their money. 

PLANING, SAWING AND M0ULDIN6 MILL, 

SASH, BLIND, DOOR AND BOX FACTORY. 
CORNISH AND STAIR BRACKETS CUT TO ORDER. 

SCROLL, M® STR&fjGHjT 8AYVEKG & TQ9EMDDN&, 

AH kinds of Flowering. Curling and Siding dressed at short notice. 

Stair Hand Rails, Newels, and Balusters worked complete 

and sent to any part of the country. 

JOHN J±. prick;, 

400 AND 402 MAIN STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 



PETER B, H21YT & CO., 

Clothin? Merchants, 



(Powgr7iJcee>psie. 

Have on hand the largest stock of 

O 3L. O "X" 3EX 

AND 

TO BE FOUND IN ANY ESTABLISHMENT 



Satisfaction guaranteed in all cases. 

CALL AND EXAMINE 

Ml I1H11 Iff »CE, 

BEFORE PURCHASING ELSEWHERE. 



We consider if mi (special pleaswre to show our Goods to all who 
favor us with a call. 

PETER B. HAYT, THE. W DAVTS. 



TIES, CRAVATS, AND COLLARS. 



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'SdaiEOHa:>i(LH a^v shaoio 



(ON THK EUKOI'EAN TLAN.) 

275 & 277 MAIN-ST., - - POUOrHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 
J . LOCKWOOD, Proprietor. 

S0HO0NMAKER, MILLS & WELLER, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS LV 

jtorign & JOamestic grg 6u0d$, 

No. 80 Water St., cor. Third, Newbargh, N. Y. 

HOUSEu SlsR & SHOW QUO IP AliSIT'Ill Qi# 

ALSO, DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 

Dry & Mixed Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Glass, &c., 

AT THE LOWES 1 PRICES. 

"WILLIA-M THOMSON, 

PAINTSHOP, 377 MAIN STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 



®EEE BROTHERS, 
IE* Ixotogx-^^lx C3r «, 1 1 o r -y . 

298 HVE^^ITST STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE, 
Ambrotypes, Ferotypes, Porcelain type*, (ions, 4Y. 

OLD PICTURES COPIED AND ENLARGED TO LIKE SIZE, 



JAMES G. WOOD & CO., 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumeries, Pure Liquors, 

Paints, Oils, Glass, &c, &c., 
ess iivr^Exr street, poughkeepsie. 



S TIE.VWJi IP S- PI.WO S, 

Mason «te Hamlin's Cabinet Organs, 

FOIl SALK AT 

THE 3VT. USIC STOIvE, 
390 3VE**ixx St., r»ovi.slili.o©iDsio, 3XT-3T. 

Bv W. FORSIIEW & CO., Sole Agents for Dutchess and Ulster Counties. 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



122 



Mott Morgan L. jun. 

Mowatt Augustus, millwright, 

Mo-watt James W. millwright, 

Murray Betsy, 

Murray John, laborer, 

Murphy Patrick, 

Murtha John A. 

Murray Fm. farmer, 

Muth Charles, bleacher, 

Myer Christian, farmer, 

Myer Louis, hotel, 

Myers John P. farmer, 

Myers Sehenek, farmer, 

Myers John, farmer, 

Myers Peter, laborer, 

Myers Warren D. farmer, 

Myers James, farmer, 

Needharn Henry, auctioneer, 

Xeedham James R. clerk, 

Xevells James, file forger, 

Xiver Henrv, machinist, 

Xiver Freeman, machinist, 

Xiver Abraham, 

Xiver Gilbert, 

Nichols J. T. manufacturer, 

Xolaud John, coachman, 

Xorris Isaac, carpenter, 

Xorthrup Jonas, wool dresser, 

Xorthrup Sarah X. 

Oakley Wm, C. Cashier First National Bank, 

Odell James, moulder, 

Odell Charles, 

Odell Elijah, farmer. 

O'Xiel Sarah, 

O'Xiel William, bartender, 

Oppie Henrietta M. widow, 

Oppie James II. 

Ortman P. laborer, 

Ostrander Peter M. farmer, 

Ott Charles, 

Overacker John H, farmer, 

Owen Thomas J. gardener, 

Owen Morgan, laborer, 

Owen Samuel J. hardware merchant, 

Owen Charles R. grocer, 

Owen J. W. saddler, &c 

Owen G. W. editor Journal, 

Owen Ransom, farmer, 

Owen Merritt, farmer, 

Owen John, laborer, 

Page John, 

Palmer Benjamin, laborer, 



Xew Hackensack. 
Fishkill Lauding. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Glenham. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Myer's Corner, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Hughsonvillc. 
near Fishkill Village. 
Xew Hackensack. 
Glenham. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Lauding. 
do. 
Fishkill Village, 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Lauding. 
near Wappingers Falls. 
Glenham. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
do . 
Matteawan. 
Hughsonvillc. 
Fishkill Landing. 
do. 
Fishkill Tillage, 
do. 
near do. 

Xew Hackensack. 
Matteawan. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Matteawan. 
Glenham. 
Fishkill Tillage, 
do. 
do. 
do. 

Glenham. 

do. 

Hughsonville. 

Matteawan. 

Glenham. 



123 



DIRKCTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Palmer Jeremiah, horse dealer, 
Palmer William, machinist, 
Palmer Charles, hatter, 
Palmer Beriah, farmer, 
Parmalee Charles, cloth shearer, 
Parsons Francis, hatter. 
Patterson Horace, machinist, 
Pay Charles, boatman, 
Pay John, boatman, 
Paynton Ashnr, hatter, 
Peacock William, calico printer, 
Peacock Ann, 
Peattie George, blacksmith, 
Peattie James, grocer, 
Peattie William, blacksmith, 
Pearsall George, carpenter, 
Pearsall Mrs. Lewis, 
Perkins John W. dyer, 
Peck William, teacher, 
Peck Rev. Whitman P. teacher, 
Peck Lyman, machinist. 
Peck darii, hat works, 

Perrine Charles H. baggage master H. R. R. 
Pettit Henry, shoemaker, 

Pettigrove James, saloon, 

Phillips George W. farmer, 

Phillips John, laborer, 

Phillips William, farmer, 

Phillips John B. fanner, 

Phillips Zebnlon, farmer, 

Phillips Hester C. 

Philips E. S. merchant, 

Pnillips William, 

Phillips James, carpenter, 

Phillips John W. harness maker, 

Phillips Deborah, widow, 

Phillips Crumeline, 

Pierce Cornelius, wool sorter, 

Pierce Stephen, blacksmith, 

Pierce Hiram, book-keeper, 

Pine Mrs. 

Pitts John I) sailor, col'd, 

Place Xehemiah, postmaster, 

Piace John, 

Piatt Harvey D. farmer, 

Piatt Ebenezer, fanner, 

Piatt Elizabeth, 

Plum Charles, farmer, 

Pollock Hannah, 

Pollock Sarah, 

Pollock Deborah, 

Pollock James E. merchant, 



Matteawan. 
do. 
do. 
Hnghsonville. 
Glenham. 
Matteawan. 
Glenham. 
Fishkill Lauding, 
do. 
Matteawan. 
Wappingers Falls. 

do. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
do. 
Matteawan. 
do. 

Glenham. 

Njw Hackensaek. 

Fishkill Village. 

Fishkill Landing. 

Matteawan. 

do. 

Wappingers Falls. 

Matteawan. 

near Wappingers Falls. 

near New Hackensaek. 

do. 
near Wappingers Falls, 
near Fishkill Village. 

do. 

Matteawan. 

Fishkill Lauding. 

do. 

do. 

Wappingers Falls. 

do. 

Glenham. 
Fishkill Landing 
Wappingers Falls. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing. 
do. 
do. 
New nackensack. 
do. 

Glenham. 

Myer's Corner. 

New Hackensaek. 

Fishkill Village. 

do. 

Fishkill Landing. 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKLL. 



124- 



Pollock Leander, machinist, 

Post Theodore, carpenter, 

Post James H. carpenter, 

Potter Charles A. teacher, 

Powers Michael, laborer, 

Pugsley Charles B. 

Pugsley Benjamin, clerk, 

Pulling Wm. A. farmer, 

Purdy David, laborer, 

Purdy Theodoras, 

Quigley William, mason, 

Quinu Catharine, 

Quinii Thomas, 

Reed Thomas J. 

Reick Fred, baker, 

Remsen Bartow W. clerk, 

Remseu Edward, 

Remsen Cornelius, physician, 

Reynolds C. A. teacher, col'd, 

Richards Benjamin, clerk, 

Richardson M. D. manufacturer, 

Richardson Henry, wool sorter, 

Riley Thomas, 

Riley Patrick, gardener, 

Riley Bartow, machinist, 

Riley Maria, 

Rippert Phillip, gardener, 

Ritter Sarah, teacher, 

Robinson Walter, 

Robinson Samuel J. farmer, 

Robinson Samuel, jr. 

Robinson John, tanner, 

Robinson Addison, laborer, 

Robinson A. C. produce dealer, 

Robinson Henry, farmer, 

Robinson Lyman, Supt. Seamless 

Robinson Isaac, farmer, 

Robinson Peter, 

Robinson X. C. 

Robinson Catharine, widow, 

Roche John S 

Rodden Michael, laborer, 

Rodgers Mary, 

Roe Daniel C. farmer, 

Roe William, farmer, 

Roe Mary Ann, widow, 

Roe Martin B. tanner, 

Roe Benjamin, farmer, 

Rogers James W. farmer, 

Rogers Caroline M. widow, 

Rogers Charles C. farmer, 

Rogers Sarah, 



Fishkill Landing. 
Glenham. 
Matteawan. 
near Fishkill Village. 
New Hackensack. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
near Fishkill Village, 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan. 
Glenham. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fiskhill Landing. 
Glenham. 
do. • 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Landing. 

do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Carthage Landing. 
Fishkill Landing. 
New Hackensack. 
do. 
do 

Glenham. 
near Fishkill Village. 
Matteawan. 
do. 
Clothing Manuf. Co. do. 

Carthage Landing. 
Matteawai.. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Glenham. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls, 
near Wappingers Falh . 
New Hackensack. 
Wappingers Falh. 
Fishkill Village, 
do. 
New Hackensack". 
Glenham 
Fishkill Villagr . 
do. 



125 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Rogers Samuel, teamster, 

Rogers Samuel, tinsmith, 

Rogers D. C. tinsmith, 

Rogers Richard, teamster, 

Rogers Charles A. machinist, 

Rogers Peter, tailor, 

Rogers Edward, 

Rogers Mary E. 

Rogers James H. 

Rogers Abraham D. farmer, 

Rogers James, harness maker, 

Rogers William H. stove dealer, 

Rolin Thomas, flagman H. R. R. 

Rollston James, bleacher, 

Rosa Theodore A. cabinet maker, 

Rosa John, 

Rosa Hyman B. cabinet maker, 

Rosa Mary D. 

Rose Samuel, col'd, 

Rothery John, file manufacturer, 

Rothery William, file manufacturer, 

Rothery William, jr.. 

Rouse Alonzo, 2d, engineer, 

Rouse Alonzo, engineer, 

House Phillip P. hotel, 

Rouse Nicholas, 
Rourke Patrick, 

Rozell Harvey, farmer, 

Rowland Thomas, flagman, 

Roy Joseph, calico printer, 

Rozell Alson, farmer, 

Rozell Robert, farmer, 

Rozell Win. H. book-keeper, with Brundage & I 

Rumsey .lames A. physician, 

Russell Win. S. farmer, 

Russell Thomas, coachman, 

Russell Austin, farmer, 

Ryan John, 

Ryan Rosa, widow, 

Ryndes Morgan, fanner, 

Sage Milo, Prest. of Fishkill Landing Machine 

Salisbury George, farmer, 

Sampson Samuel, laborer, col'd. 

Somers Edward, grocer, 

Sandfofd J. (i. 

Sandford .Moses, 

Sargent 11. W. 

Saunters Elijah, brick maker, 

Saunters Nicholas, brick maker, 

Saunters Stephen, brick maker, 

Savage Joseph I;. 

Sayles Diana, col'd, 



Matte a wan. 
do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Glenham. 
Fishkill Lauding. 

do. 

do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Village. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan. 

do. 

do 

Carthage Landing. 

1 do. 

do. 

do. 

Fishkill Landing. 

Fishkill Landing. 

do 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Village. 
do. 
adue, Fishkill Landing. 
do. 
near Fishkill Village. 
Matteawan; 
near Fishkill Village. 
Wappingers Falls, 
'do 

Glenham. 
Co., Fishkill Landing. 
New Backensack. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan. 
do. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

do 



/ 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 126 

Savles Harry, laborer, col'd, Fishkill Landing. 

Sayles William, laborer, eol'd, Fishkill Village. 

Schnapp Anthony, saloon, Fishkill Lauding 

Schenck John B. manufacturer of machinery, Matteawan 

Schenck John P. physician, do. 

Schenck John P. jun. physician, do. 

Schenck Thomas J. B. manufacturer of machinery, do. 

Schreider Victor, file cutter, do. 

Schouten Abraham, laborer, Fishkill Village. 

Schouten Abraham. do. 

Schouten Jacob, do. 

Schouten Stephen, undertaker, Fishkill Landing. 

Schouten Jerome, machinist, Fishkill Landing. 

Schouten Mrs. S. saloon and confectionery, do. 

Schrey F. saloon and fur dealer, Matteawan. 

Schriver Jacob A. blacksmith, uear New Hackensack. 

Schriver John IT. farmer, do. 

Schuchardt Ferdinand, Hughsonville. 

Scofield Alson, farmer, near Myer's Corner. 

Scofield Edmund, farmer, near do. 

Scofield Jerome, livery, Fishkill Village. 

Scofield Emily, do. 

Scofield Julia, do. 

Scofield Cordelia, do. 

Scofield Frederic lv. farmer, Glenham 

Scofield Frances A. teacher, Fishkill Village. 

Scofield Aletta M. do. 

Scofield Ephraim E. farmer, do. 

Scofield Joseph E. farmer, do. 

Scofield Miles, farmer, do. 

Scofield Ephraim M. farmer, do. 

Scofield John S. Glenham. 

Scofield Ezekiel, miller, Tioronda Mills, Fishkill Lauding. 

Scofield Jacob L. agent and civil engineer, do. 

Scofield Sidney, agent and civil engineer, do. 

Scofield Robert, laborer, col'd, do 

Scott James E. laborer, do. 

Scribner George H. weaver, Matteawan. 

Seamless Clothing Manufacturing Co. do. 

Seaman John B. Fishkill Landing. 

Sebring Margaret A. Carthage Lauding. 

Secor James, laborer, " Glenham. 

Secor Jacob, laborer, Fishkill Village. 

Secor Isaac, farmer, Hughsonviile. 

Secor John J. farmer, do. 

Senecal Gustus, Fishkill Village. 

Serrine Wm. H. laborer, Glenham. 

Serriue John, file hardener, Matteawan. 

Serrine Nathaniel, teamster, do. 

Serrine William, farmer, Hughsonville. 

Serrine Jacob, do. 

Servoss Thomas C. manufacturer of machinery, Matteawan. 



127 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Servoss Henry, Matteawan. 

Seward Susan, New Hackensack. 

Seward "William, farmer, do. 

Sewell John, carriage maker, (S. & J. Sewell,) Fishkill Landing. 

Sewell Samuel, blacksmith & carriage mkr,(S. & J. Sewell,) do. 



Shann John, farmer, 

Shay Thomas, 

Shay James, machinist, 

Shaw Joseph L. wool sorter, 

Shaw George E. farmer, 

Shearer Charles, carriage maker. 

Shearer John, comb maker, 

Shearer George, wagon maker, 

Sherman Michael, carpenter, 

Sheppard Joseph, mule spinner, 

Sheppard Edward, cigar maker, 

Sheridan Patrick, 

Sherwood Joseph, farmer. 

Sherwood Stephen H. pump maker, 

Sherwood Edward II. printer, 

Shove Seth, 

Shurter John H. farmer, 

Shurter Felix, 

Shurter James E. lumber and coal dealer, 

Simpson George, soap and candle manuf. 

Slack Henry, physician, 

Slater Thomas, carpenter, 

Slanson Seely, cooper, 

Slauson Charles F. laborer, 

Slaven Lawrence, laborer, 

Sleight Edgar, fanner. 

Sleight Frank, measurer, 

Slithers John, fanner, 

Smith Abraham, laborer, 

Smith Abraham 1). farmer, 

Smith Thomas, farmer, 

Smith Thomas, laborer, col'd, 

Smith Silas G. grocer, (S. G. & J. T. Smith.) 

Smith John T. dry goods, (S. G. & J. T. Smith,) 

Smith John, farmer, 

Smith John, baker, 

Smith .lames, fanner, 

Smith James, carpenter, 

Smith James, laborer, 

Smith James E. fanner, 

Smith James T. fanner, 

Smith Charles T. cigar maker, 

Smith Wm. J. grocer, (Smith it Stotesbury,) 

Smith Everett A. 

Smith Amhrose, belt and hose, 

Smith Ezra, pouncer, 

Smith Theodore, clerk, 



Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan. 
do. 
near llughsonville. 
Wappingers Falls, 
do. 
llughsonville. 
"Wappingers Falls. 
Glenham. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
near Fishkill Village, 
do. 
do. 
Matteawan. 
Carthage Landing. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
do. 
do. 

Glenham. 
Fishkill Village. 

do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
near New Hackensack. 
Hughsonville. 
Glenham. 
near Fishkill Villa; e. 
llughsonville. 
near Fishkill Village. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Fishkill Landine. 
Fishkill Village, 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Wappingers Falls, 
do. 
Fishkill Village. 
near do. 

Glenham. 

Fishkill Landing. 

Matteawan. 

do. 

do. 

Fishkill Landing 



S. G. & J. T. SMITH 

No. 20 Main Street, Pishkill Landing. 




The inhabi- 
tants of Kish- 
kill and vicini- 
ty will find at 
No. 20 Main st. 
a general as- 
sortment of 
fine family 
Groceries. Pro- 
visions. Flour, 
Croi kcry and 
Hardware. 

There are 
many styles of 
fine Groceries 
^ which are not 
to usually kept in 
is. the country, & 
S families using 
them, have the 
£ trouble and 
3". expense of 
^sending to 
New York for 
them, we have 
constantly on 
hand an assort- 
ment of goods 



compris ing 

every thing in 
7~~ttae line neces. 

sary to furnish 
s=-. a first class 

table. 



ON THE UPPER FLOOR, 

a general assortment of 

Dry Goods, Bleached & Brown Sheeting & Shirting, 

Dress Goods. Prints, Ginghams, Black Silks, Cloths, Cassimeres & Trimmings, 

Flannels, White Goods, Linens, Hoop Skirts, Notions, 
and any thing in the line of Staple and Fancy Dry Goods. 

Our goods are bought exclusively for cash and will be sold at a 
very small advance. 

Persons are solicited to examine onr stock and prices before 
purchasing elsewhere. 



129 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Smith Phillip, grocer, 

Smith Phillip, Groveville, 

Smith Geonre C. book-keeper Rubber Work; 

Smith Mrs. A. 

Smith Elijah, laborer, 

Smith Oe'Witt C. grocer, 

Smith Leonard, jr. Rubber Works, 

Smith Lewis, Rubber Works, 

Smith Benjamin, farmer, 

Smith Gabriel, laborer, 

Smith Andrew, hack driver, 

Smith G. A. laborer, 

Smith Sebring, farmer, 

Smith Harvey C. carpenter, 

Smith Joseph, farmer, 

Smith J. P. laborer, 

Smith Robert, tile maker, 

Smith Garnet, engineer, 

Smith Guernsey, clerk and agent, 

Smith Leonard, Rubber Works. 

Smith Phebe, widow, 

Smith George, designer, 

Snook Joseph, farmer. 

Snook Stephen, farmer, 

Snook Gilbert, farmer, 

Snook Griffin, saloon, 

Snook Mathew I. farmer, 

SoutheeMrs. W. W. milliner, 

Southee W. W., U. S. service. 

Southard John 11. laborer, 

Southard Edwin, farmer, 

Southard Caroline, 

Southard John, laborer, 

Southard Jane, 

Southard Sylvester, farmer, 

Spaight John W. Editor Standard. 

Staunton George W. farmer, 

Stafford George, 

Stafford P. T. carpenter, 

Stauback Baldwin, barber, 

Stevens William, farmer, 

Stevens Samuel, farmer, 

Stevens Henry L. lumber, 

Stebbins clerk, 

Stewart Thomas, 

Stevenson Sinclair, Mattcawan Hat Works. 
Stevenson George L. blacksmith, 
Stevenson David, blacksmith) 
Ste\ enson Jeremiah, blacksmith, 
Stotesbury William, machinist, 
Stotesbury John, wagon maker, 
Stotesbury Charles, grocer, (Smith A Stotesl 



Fishkill Landing. 
Glenham 
;, Matteawan. 

do 
Fishkill Village, 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
do. 
near Wappingers falls. 
do. 
Fishkill Village. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
near do. 

Wappingers Falls. 

do. 

Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

do. 

Wappingers Falls. 

'do. 
Carthage Landing, 
near Fishkill Village. 
near do. 

Fishkill Landing. 
Carthage Landing. 
Fishkill Village. 
do. 

do. 
do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Fishkill Landing. 
near Myer's Corner. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 

Fishkill Village. 
near do. 

near do. 

Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
Hughsonville. 
Fishkill Landing 

do. 

Glenham. 

do 

Fishkill Landing. 

do. 
airy,) do. 



yi 



WILTS! 



DEALER IN 



-JUt/eilneM} J^/atut/ed-j J^Jlwnfe&j 

f HIPS, PLANKETS, BUFPALOS, BELLS. 
1TRAVELING BAGS, RETICULES, 

AND ALL ARTICLES CONNECTED WITH THE TRADE, 

44 Water St., Newburgh, N. Y. 





T^3*a- 



MATTEAWAN MILLS. 

HIGHEST CASH PRICE PAID AT THIS MILL FOR 

WHEAT, RYE, CORN, OATS, BUCKWHEAT. 

FOR SALE AT THIS MILL : 

Extra Superfine Family Flour. Graham Flour and extra Rye Flour. 

Bolted Yellow and White Meal. Samp and Hominy, and 

Buckwheat Flour. All kinds of Feed and Grain. 

RFFUS R. BELKNAP. LYNDE BELKNAP. 




Sanniel JL ©wei, 

IVEmxxx-St., IF'isl-xlxJLll, I>3". 

Dealer in Hardware, Cutlery, Mechanics' Tools, Farm- 
ing Implements, Locks and Hinges, Screws, Carriage 
and Tire Bolts, "Wooden and Britannia Ware, Bar Iron 
and Steel. Nails. Assortment of Ploughs and Castings, &c, &c. 

T, S. & H. M. LESTER, MERCHANT TAILORS, 

AND DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OP CLOTHS, CASSIMERES & VESTINGS . 

Of flood Materials, Well Made <,nd of the most approved Styles, always on hand. 
Youths' and Children's Clothing. Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, of all descrip- 
tions, viz : Shirts, Collar . Cravats Gloves, &c. Also an assortment of the latest 
styles of Hats and Caps, 21 MAIN STREET, FLSHKILL LANDING, N. Y 
N. B. — Clothes cut and made to order, at short notice, and warranted to suit. 



JHL 



A, I. BUNDLKY 



% 



Dealer 1 in Flour and Feed, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, 

at his Mill in Brinckerhoffville. 



[i,2^- 




6 



SIEAM FREfGl? MB P1SSAI1 LINE 

^^^8^1 BETWEEN NEW HAMBURGH 

AND NEW YORK 

THE PROPELLER "WYOMING," 

('apt. WM. ff ASBROOK, will leave NEW HAMBURG B for New 
York, every Monday and Thursday, at (5 o'clock p. m. 

Will leave N"EW YORK, from loot of Franklin street, every Wed- 
nesday and Saturday, at 4 o'clock p. ni. 

BTFlonr, Plaster, Coarse mid Fine Salt. Hay, Hope, &C., kept on 
hand and for sale at reasonable price. 

John P. MttLABD, ? j p MILLARD & B R0. 

Samuel N. Millard, S 

Pre-eminently the Company for those desiring cheap and safe Insurance, is the 
GLENS FALLS INSURANCE COMPANY, located at Glens Falls, Warren 
County, New York. 

Cash Capital and Surplus $220,000. Of which over $140,000 is invested in 
United States Stocks, the best of all securities 

The rates of Insurance (especially on Farm Property) are lower than any 
other Company of like responsibility. 

The Company has always been liberal in paying its honest claims whether 
technically liable or not, settling 670 losses ami paying on the same over $21 1,000, 

with but one solitary case of litigaticn. 
Unlike other Companies, this Company pays tor damage done by lightning, 

whether tire ensues or not, and it also insures live Stock when desired against 
death by lightning when at large on the farm. 

JAMES E. DEAN, \gent at Fishkill. 




CARTHAGE LANDING HOTEL. 

Carthage Landing, N. Y. 
Best of TlQDORS and CIGARS, always on hand 

BOARD BY THE DAY AND WEEK, 

PHILIP P. ROUSE, Proprietor. 



#. 13. Eh SI2&I?IfflMP8 

NO. 61 WATER STREET, NEWBURGH. 



'09 



]V£ e r c h a n t Tailors. 

GENTS 1 Furnishing GOODS, FINE READY-MADE CLOTHING. 
No. 79 Water, cor. of Third Street, Newburgh. 

STEAM SAW MILL, 

95 Front Street, Newburgh, 1ST. Y. 

All sorts of dressing of Lumber, Scroll Sawing, Mouldings, Blinds, 

Doors and Sashes made to order with dispatch. 

J. W. McCULLOUGH, 

(Brnamenial <Parble and jStatuarjj IRorh, 

IOI Front St., JVewbnrgh, JV. »*. 

The undersigned, CLASSICAL and ARTIFICIAL HAIR DRESSERS, 
would inform the public generally, that they have recently refited and elegantly 
decorated the Old Establishment. No. 47 FRONT ST., NEWBURGH, and have 
added a separate Room and Entrance expressly for LADIES' and CHIL- 
DREN'S HAIR CUTTING, HAIR DRESSING and SHAMPOOING. 

All kinds of Ornamental Hair Work, Bands, Braids, Waterfalls, Puffs, Opseys, 
Frizets, Wigs and Toupees, constantly on hand or made to order at short notice. 
Old Hair Work made over and Dressed in the latest style. Also a select assort- 
ment of IMPORTED PERFUMERY of the most celebrated French and German 
manufacture. Hair Brushes, Combs, Tooth-Brushes, and other articles indis- 
pensible to a Ladies' Toilet. O. B.FRANKLIN & SON. 



gTtfig, Til- Will, &€. 



The subscriber invites the public to call and examine his extensive 
stock of 

Sftmt, lit, §®fpt 9 jPiiitf tm, 

AND PRITANNIA WARE; 

Also, the celebrated base-burning Coal Stove "ORIENTAL," 
awarded the first premium at the New York State Fair in l c 63. It 
has ventilating apparatus, so that tlieimpure air is drawn through the 
stove-pipe into the chimney. No dust can escape while-shaking the 
grate. No escape of gas; no clinker. The attention of house-keepers 
is also invited to the first-class Cooking Stove "DICTATOR." 

There are few good Coal Stoves in market, and the fault is in the 
grate. This is remedied by having WINTEKBCRN'S COMBINED 
REVOLVING and DUMPING GRATE, patented Nov. 3, 1863. 

Plumbing and Jobbing promptly attended to. 

D. C. ROGERS, 

xSo. 5 Main St., Matteawan. 

TIGROID A MILLS, 

NiOUfi, MEAL 11® FEED., 

constantly on band and for sale at wholesale and retail, 

AT THE LOWEST MARKET RATES. 

Custom work done promptly in the best manner. The highest market 
price paid in cash for all kinds of grain. 

LOGS BOUGHT OR SAWED TO ORDER. 
PINE AND HARD WOOD PLANK AND TIMBER 

constantly on hand or furnished at short notice. 
EZEKIEL SCOFIELD, 

PROPRIETOR. 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



130 



Storms Abraham, farmer, 

Stradley Benjamin, farmer, 

Stoutenburgta Jacob, farmer, 

Stoutenburgh ffm. H. farmer, 

Strong Jacob H. marble dealer, 

Strong Charles L. stone dealer, 

Sturgess John H. merchant, 

Statt John B. merchant, 

Sullivan Mary, 

Sullivan Thomas, clerk, 

Sullivan Barnard, cooper, 

Sullivan George H. cigar store, 

Sntton James, cloth dresser, 

Suydan Henry, 

Swartwout Catharine 0. 

Swartwout Ann K. 

Sweet Jane, 

Swift H. N. manufacturer of machinery, 

Sypher James W. carpenter, 

Taplin John A. machinist, 

Taxou John, 

Taylor William J. dyer, 

Taylor John, laborer, 

Taylor J. W. hatter, 

Taylor Edward E. feed store, 

Taylor James, mason, 

Tate Heur}', laborer, i 

Teller Jacob V. B. farmer, 

Teller Hon. Isaac, farmer, 

Teller "William, grocer and dry goods, 

Terbnsh John, butcher, 

Terwilliger John J. carpenter, 

Terwilliger Michael, carpenter, 

Terwilliger Augustus, carpenter. 

Teal Isaac, painter, 

Theal Gilbert D. painter, 

Thomas E. Y. B wagon maker, 

Thomas Alexander, laborer, col'd, 

Thomas Joseph, pedlar, col'd, 

Thompson Samuel, laborer, col'd, 

Thompson William, wool washer, 

Thomson William F. gardener, 

Thompsi n James, moulder, 

Thome E farmer, 

Thorn Robert, farmer, 

Thorn John, 

Thorn James T. 

Thornhill Joseph, laborer, 

Thorelfall James, madder dyer, 

Ticehurst Charles, baker, 

Ticehurst William, butcher, 

Ticehurst Ebenezer, hatter, 



Fishkill Village. 

near Hughsonville. 

New Hackensack. 

do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
do. 
Carthage Landing. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Glenham. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Matteawan. 
Glenham. 
Hughsonville. 
Fishkill Village, 
near do. 

Wappingers Falls. 
Matteawan. 
Hughsonville. 
Carthage Landing. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Village. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing, 
clo. 
do. 
near New Hackensack. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
do. 
Matteawan. 

do. 

Matteawan. 

Fishkill Landing. 

Fishkill Village. 

do. 

Glenham. 
Fishkill Village. 
Glenham. 
Fishkill Landing: 
do. g 
do. 
New Hackensack. 
Glenham. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls, 
do. 
Matteawan. 
do. 
do. 



131 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Tiel William, hatter, 

Tilber James, machinist, 

Tilford Maria, widow, 

Tillott Caleb M , farmer, 

Tillott David K. 

Tillott Deborah, 

Tillott Margaret. 

Togno K, Aeelie, principal select school, 

Tomlins William, gardener, 

Tomlins John, laborer, 

Tomlinson Horace, 

Tompkins Solqinan, merchant, and expressman, 

Tompkins Fountain, 

Tompkins Lewis, hatter, 

Toohey Matthias, fanner, 

Toohey Michael, 

Townsend Sylvester, farmer, 

Townsend Carpenter D. 

Townsend Sarah E. seamtress, 

Travis Nathaniel, mason, 

Travis John K. mason, 

Traver Frederic, tanner, 

Tremaiu John F. carpenter, 

Trinter Adam, blacksmith, 

Throop John W. 

Tully Peter, artist. 

Turner George, laborer, 

Tyson Rev. Ira C. Presbyterian clergyman, 

[Jnderhill Anthony, physician, 

Underhill Tauiar A. candy store. 

[Jnderhill Samuel, butcher, 

Underhill William, horse dealer, 

Vail Wm. K. farmer, 

Vail Stephen, fanner, 

Vail Benjamin, saddler, 

Vail Joseph, farmer, 

Vail Abraham, fanner, 

Vandebnrgh John, painter, 

Vanderbilt Philip B. hotel, 

Vanderbilt John P. 

Vanderwerker William X. shoemaker, 

Vanderwerker Edwin, clerk, 

Vandewater Bartow, blacksmith, 

Vandewater Adolphus, belt maker, 

Vandewater Alathew, tanner and bell maker, 

Vandewater Myers, fanner, 

Vandewater Herman, fanner, 

Vandewater Benjamin, mason, 

Vandewater A.dolphus, fanner, 

Vandewater Delaney, farmer, 

Vandewater Henry, fanner, 

Varrick Charles A. 



Matteawan. 
do. 

Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

do. 
Matteawan. 

do. 

do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
New Eackensack. 
Fishkill Village. 
Wappinf ers Falls. 
Fishkill Village. 
do. 
Hughsonville. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Landing. 

do. 
Wappingers Palls 
Matteawan. 
Hnghsoin [lie. 
New Eackensack. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 
Matteawan. 
Hughsonville. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Matteawan. 
New Eackensack. 

do. 

Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

Matteawan. 

do. 

do. 
near Fishkill Village, 
near do. 

Eughsonville. 
near Fishkill Village. 
near do. 

near do. 

do. 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



182 



near Fishkill Tillage, 
near Hughsonville. 
Glenham. 
do. 
FisnMl] Landing. 
do. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
near Fishkill Village. 
Fishkil] Landing. 



Varnel Epenetus, farmer, 

Van Amburgh Win. farmer, 

Van Amburgh Edward, farmer, 

Van Amburgh Martha, 

Van Amburgh Harriet, 

Van Amburgh James A. farmer, 

Van Amburgh Charles, farmer, 

Van Amburgh Edgar, shoemaker. 

Van Anden Charles A. farmer, 

Van Buren Loreuzo, brickmaker, 

Van Brunt Cornelius, See. Fishkill Landing Mach. Co., do. 

Van Buren Smith, lawyer, do. 

Van Buren Squire, brickmaker, do. 

Van Cleef Rev. Cornelius, Kef. Dutch clergyman, New Hackensack. 

Van De Bogart William, mason, do. 

Van Dozen N". M. physician, Hughsonville. 

Van Houten Peter L. machinist, Matteawau. 

Van Kleeck Robert, farmer, near Myer's Corner. 

Van Kleeck Levi L. farmer, near Fishkill Village. 

Van Kleeck Susan, Hughsonville. 

Van Xosdall Richard, farmer, do. 

Van Xosdall Alouzo, blacksmith, do. 

Van Xosdall Heber, blacksmith, do. 

Van Xostrand Gideon L. farmer, Xew Hackensack. 

Van Xostrand Valentine, miller, do. 

Van Xostrand James A. farmer, Fishkill Village. 

Van Xostrand J. machinist, Matteawan. 

Van Steeubergh James E., Cashier Xational Bank, Fishkill Village. 

Van Tassel Henry, laborer, near Myer's Corner. 

Van Tine Cornelius, machinist, Matteawan. 

Van Tine Abraham, blacksmith, do. 

Van Tine. John H. machinist, do. 

Van Tine Charles, machinist, do. 

Van Tine Albert, combmaker, Wappingers Falls 

Van Vliet John, farmer, Fishkill Landing 

Van Vliet Sylvcnus, do. 

Van Vliet Granville, book-keeper Fishkill Landing Mach. Co., do. 

Van Vliet Theodore, time-keeper Matteawan Hat Works, Matteawan 



Van Voorhis Jo&eph, fanner, 

Van Voorhis Obadiah, farmer, 

Van Voorhis Jerome, farmer, 

Van Voorhis Win. H. farmer, 

Van Voorhis William C. farmer, 

Van Voorhis Samuel A. miller, 

Van Voorhis Catharine, 

Van Voorhis Catharine, 

Van Voorhis Coert A. 

Van Voorhis Henry, 

Van Voorhis Elias C farmer, 

Van Voorhis William B. shoemaker, 

Van Voorhis William H. fanner, 

Van Voorhis Fred, bookseller and news dea''r 



Myer's Come- 
do, 
do. 
near EughsonviU" 
near Fishkill Village, 
near do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
do. 

near do. 

Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing, 
do. 



1&- 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Van Voorhis Henry, wagon maker, 

Van Voorhis Abraham Z. 

Van Voorhis William II. painter, 

Vau Voorhis William II. laborer, 

Van Voorhis William, farmer, 

Van Voorhis Townsend, laborer, 

Van Voorhis Charles, farmer. 

Van Voorhis John, laborer, 

Van Wagenen Wm. A. agent, 

Van Wyck Cortland, farmer, 

Van Wyck Abraham D. farmer, 

Van Wyck John C. farmer, 

Van Wvck William, 

Van Wyck Jacob G. farmer, 

Van Wyck Maria, 

Van Wyck Caroline, 

Van Wyck Aclelia, 

Van Wyck Sidney E. grape grower, 

Van Wyck Joseph J. 
Van Wyck Henry, farmer, 

Velie William M. farmer, 

Vermilyea Isaac 8. farmer, 
Vermilyea Eliza, 

Verplanck Mary H. 

Verplanck William S. firmer, 

Verplanck Mrs. S. 

Verplanck James D. farmer, 

Vincent Franklin, boarding, 

Vincent Charles, laborer, col'd, 

Vredenburgh Mrs. W. 

Wade Thomas, gardener, 

Wade George H. miller, 

Walcott H. F. 

Waleott Barbaretta, 

Waldron Edward, 

Walker George, teamster, 

Wall William J. file cutter. 

Wallace James, hatter, 

Wanzer Floyd, grocer, 

Ward Wm. 11. boatman. 

Washington Susan, col'd, 

Warner Richard S. hatter, 

Warren Samuel K. carpenter. 

Warren David, laborer, 

Warwick William C. grocer, 

Way Alonzo, shoemaker, 

Way Sebring, painter, 

Way Catharine, widow. 

Way James T. shoemaker, 

Way Mrs. Melissa, dress maker, 

Way Thomas J. machinist, 

Way Thomas, machinist, 



Hughsonville. 
near Wappingers Falls. 
Hughsonville. 
do. 
Wappingers Falls, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing, 
near Fishkill Plains, 
near do. 

Fishkill Village. 

do. 

do. 

near do. 

near do. 

do. 

near do. 

do. 
Carthage Landing. 
New Hackeusack. 
near do. 

Hughsonville 
Fishkill Landing. 
do. 
do. 

do. 

Fishkill Village. 

do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Hughsonville. 
near Fishkill Village. 

do. 

do. 

near do. 

Matteawan. 
do. 

do. 

Matteawan. 

Carthage Landing. 

Fishkill Landing. 

Matteawan. 

Wappingers Palls. 

Hughsonville. 

Matteawan. 

Fishkill Village. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Fishkill Lauding. 

Matteawan. 

Fishkill Landing. 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



134: 



Weaver William, moulder, 

Webb Jared D. harness maker, 

Webb Phebe, widow, 

Webb Henry, carpenter, 

Webber Joseph, stone cutter, 

Weeks Barbara, widow, 

Weeks William, laborer, 

Weeks Washington, laborer, 

Weeks Albert, farmer, 

Weeks Cornelius S. carpenter. 

Weeks Israel, farmer, 

Wells Julia, 

Wells John W. merchant, 

Wells Jacob C. merchant, 

Wells Frank B. principal school dist. No. '2, 

Wescott Abraham, farmer, 

Wescott George W. farmer and coal dealer, 

Wescott Charles, farmer, 

Wetmore Theodore R. 

Wheeler L. E. pouncer, hat works. 

White Charles D. farmer, 

White Mary, 

White Anna. 

White Ortanir, 

White William, farmer, 

White Lewis H. physician, 

White Lewis B. farmer, 

White Alfred, farmer, 

White William, 

White Harriet, 

White John, tinsmith, 

White Charles, machinist. 

Whitney A brain, carpenter, 

Whiton Milo J. physician, 

Wight George S. grocer, 

Wiggins Mary. 

Wilcox Edward W. carpenter, 

Wilde Caroline, widow, 

Wilde Susan, 

Wiley Edgar, laborer, 

Williams Abraham, teamster, 

Williams Ezra, 

Williams William, laborer, 

Williams Peter A. laborer. 

Williamson John, 

Williamson Mrs. widow, 

Willis W. H. 

Wilson Simeon, shoemaker, 

Wiltsie Wm. G. butcher, 

Wiltse Jane, widow, 

Wiltse Albert, file cutter, 

Wiltse Mrs. 



Wappingers Palls 
Fishkill Village. 
Hughsonville. 
Matteawan. 
Hnshsonville. 
Fishkill Village, 
do. 
do. 
near do. 

do. 

Glenham. 
Fishkill Village, 
do. 
do. 
Fishkill Landing. 
Glenham. 
do. 
do. 
Hughsonville. 
Matteawan. 
near Fishkill Village, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
near do. 

do. 
do. 
near do. 

uear do. 

do. 
Fishkill Landing 
do. 
do. 
Fishkill Village. 
Matteawan. 
do. 
Fishkill Lauding 
Fishkill Village, 
do. 
Wappingers Falls. 
Fishkill Village. 
Fishkill Landing. 

do. 
Wappingers Falls, 
do. 
do. 
Hughsonville. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Village, 
do. 
Matteawan. 
Fishkill Landing. 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 



Wiltse Alonzo P. 

Windall James, laborer, 

Withers James, laborer. 

Wixon Lemuel, farmer, 

Wolcott Charles M. farmer, 

"Wood Gilbert B. farmer, 

Wood James, farmer, 

"Wood John I. laborer. 

"Wood Joseph J. farmer, 

"Wood Isaac X. shoemaker. 

Wood Joseph W, laborer, 

Wood Charles, cigar maker, 

Wood Theodore, teamster, 

Wood Wm. A. carpenter. 

Wood James M. merchant, 

Wood Phebe, 

Wood James, engineer, 

Wood John, clerk, 

Wood Elizabeth, dress maker, 

Wood William W. Eagle Hotel, 

Wood Amos E. machinist, 

Woodfield Peter, laborer, 

Woodhnll Gilbert T. Presbyterian clergyman, 

Woodhnll Vincent, 

Woodward Darwin W. 

Worden James P. machinist, 

Worden Mrs. J. P. ice cream saloon. 

Worden Thomas, calico printer, 

Worden Elizabeth A. music teacher, 

Worseley Henry, machinist, 

Wunstein Charles, carriage painter, 

Yates Thomas, machinist, 

Yates A. machinist, 

Yates John, tinsmith, 

Youmans P. D. trackmaster II R. !<'. 

Young, J. M. pattern maker, 



Fishkill Landing. 

Wappingers Falls. 

Glenham. 

near Fishkill Village. 

Fishkill Landing. 

Myer's Corner. 

near Fishkill Village. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
near do. 

Glenham. 
Fishkill Village, 
do. 
Matteawan. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

Wappingers Falls. 

near Fishkill Village. 

Glenham. 

Wappingers Falls. 

Matteawan. 

do. 

Wappingers Falls. 

'do. 
do. 

Fishkill Landing. 

Matteawan. 

Fishkill Landing. 

do. 

do. 

M;it lea wan. 



Grocery, Oyster 



AND 






DEALER IX 



(Stormcs, f c^ctablcrv K*e, 





d)07bf&ctw?i&ry ; <Sfuts ; Sc. ; ^k 

FishHll Lanfa II. 7. 



■5' 



{$3^* Parties or Families supplied with Ice 
Cream, Oysters, etc., in any quantity, at short 
notice. Ice by the hundred or ton. 



Insurance Agency 



V t Ms 

FISHKILl ON HUDSON, N. Y, 

GASH CAPITAL. 

Home Insurance Co. of New York, $2,000,000 
^Etna Insurance Co. of Hartford, 3,000,000 

Insurance Co. of North America, Phila., 500,000 
Putnam Insurance Co., Hartford, 500,000 

Harmony Insurance Co., New York, 300,000 
Dutchess Co. Mutual Ins. Co. of Po'keepsie, 800,000 



OFFICE NO. 5 SOUTH AVENUE. 



A. W. ARMSTRONG, 

Wappingerc Falls, U. 7., 



1>KALKR IX ALL KINDS OF 



including the 
Oriental Base Burning Parlor Stoves and Heaters, 

which will burn an entire season without rekindling. A 1st), 

HOT AIR FURNACES & COOKING RANGES, 

together with a genera] assortment of 

gntannia and gtated Ware, <fabk (Tutlm*, 

Kerosene Lamps, Lanterns and Fixtures, 
Ciu! hes YYiiii^'Ts, Plain and Jappaiied Tin Ware, &c. 

hi mmim* mxm, mssm, 

AND ALL KINDS OF 

TIN, COPPLR, LEAD AND SHEET IRON WORK 

DONE WITH DISPATCH & SATISFACTION GUARANTEED, 



MERCHANT TAILOR, 

MAIN STREET, FISHKILL VILLAGE, 

has always on hand a large assortment of 

ftcacto ||aclc ^iatlmtg; 

which for style, durability and cheapness cannot he surpassed. Also, 

HATS, CAPS, BOOTS, SHOES, RUBBERS, 



AND 



^/enl ; s ffiiw'TbisMng <$oods ; 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



The Custom Department will receive strict attention, 
every article warranted to fit or can be exchanged. 

E. BALL, FtSHtULL VILLAGE. 
CASH STORE. 



JAMES A. HOPPER, 

ta©iss mi© mm vMrntm, 

Faper Hanging, 

GRAINING AND GLAZING. 

Newburgh Avenue, Fishkill Landing. 
iy Orders by mail promptly attended to. 

CARTER A* JflcCJMWJr, 

TOBACCO Ml SHU MANUFACTURERS. 

ESTABLISHED 1789. 
70 "\^7"«*.-t©r- Street, ^S"e>x*7-"l3xi.rg;:ki.. 

Wholesale Dealers in Snuff, Manufactured Tobacco, Pipes, &c. 
ENOCH CARTER. ALEX. McCANN. 



EAGLE FOUNDRY, 

Wappingers Falls, Dutchess Co., N. Y. 

DISBROW & GORING. 

■ -^- • -^ 

OF ALL KINDS MADE TO ORDER. 

Hay Cutters, Field Rollers, Plows and Plow Castings, 

Horse and Hand Rakes and Agricultural Implements generally, con- 
stantly on hand. Particular attention is called to our 

Celebrated "Wooden Pumps. 

Repairing and General Jobbing promptly attended to. 
N. U. DISBROW. E. M. GORING. 



APPENDIX. 



TOWN OFFICERS. 



Supervisor — Augustus Hughson, Fishkill Village. 

Town Clerk — Lyman Robinson, Matteawan. 

Justice of Peace— H. H. Hustis, Fishkill Lauding; E. S. Phillips, 

Matteawan; J. B. Moufort, Fishkill Tillage; F. I. Jackson, 

Hughsouville. 
Collector — J. E. Shurter, Fishkill Landing. 

Assessors — John B. Jones, Fishkill Tillage ; Levi Tan Kleeck, Fish- 
kill Tillage ; David K. Tillott, Fishkill Landing 
Commissioners of Highways — J. X. Ladue, Fishkill Tillage ; Jerome 

Tan Toorhis, Fishkill Tillage ; Xoah Hanson, Fishkill Landing. 
Town Auditors — George S. Wight, Matteawan; Anthony Underbill, 

Fishkill Tillage ; Morgan Emigh, Fishkill Tillage ; Zachariah T. 

Hasbrook, Hughsouville. 
Constables — Daniel Green, Matteawan; George L. Howe, Fishkill 

Tillage ; Gilbert F. Cole, Tfappingers Falls. % 



CORPORATION OFFICERS OF FISHKILL LANDINC. 

Trustees— H. H. Hustis, D. S. McLaughlin, Wm. Stotesbury, John T. 

Smith, fm. X. Tanderwerker. 
Street Commissioners — Xoah Hanson, Tfalter Brett, Stephen Saunters. 
Assessors — Charles Dimon, P. D. Toumans, T. S. Lester. 
Collector— Wm. J. Smith. 
Treasurer — J. W. Spaight. 
Clerk— Fred. Tan Toorhis. 
Pound Master— J. I. Green. 

138 



139 DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 

POST OFFICES. 

Fishkill-on-Hudson— N. Place, P. M. 
Matteawan — D. Davis, P. M. 
Gleuhain — J. Jaycox, P. M. 
Fishkill— J. W. Brett, P. M. 
Carthage Landing — G. Budd, P. M. 
Hughsonville— T. V. Hasbrook, P. M. 
Wappingers Falls — Elias Brown, P. M. 
New Hackensack— Philip B. Yanderbilt, P. M. 
New Hamburgh — Samuel H. Jones, P. M. 



TELEGRAPH OFFICE. 

Af Depot Hudson River Railroad. Miss Phelps, Operator. 



LIST OF MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS 

Paying a Revenue Tax. 

Ackerman James, Fishkill Landing, Carriages. 

Disbrow & Goring, Wappingers Falls, Iron Foundry. 

Dutchess Company, Wappingers Falls, Printed Calico. 

Franklindale Mills. Wappingers Falls, Cotton Cloths. 

Fishkill Landing Machine Company, Fishkill Landing, Machinery. 

Glenham Company, Glenham, Woolen Cloths. 

Jackson & Davis, Matteawan, Carriages. 

Mase Willard II., Matteawan, Paper Boxes. 

McLaughlin D. S., Fishkill Landing, Cigars. 

Marsh Samuel, Glenham, Tobacco. 

N'iehols & Brown, Wappingers Fails. Combs. 

New York Rubber Company, Matteawan, Rubber Goods. 

Rothery John & William, Matteawan, Files. 

Sewell S. & J., Fishkill Landing, Carriages. 

Seamless Clothing Manufacturing Company, Matteawan, Felt Hats. 

Scheiick Machine Company, Matteawan, Planing Machines, &c. 

Swift Horatio X., Matteawan, Mowers and Machinery. 

Simpson George, Fishkill Landing, Soap and Candles. 

Yandewater A. & Son, Matteawan, Leather Belting. 

Vandewater Mat hew, Matteawan, Leather Melting. 

Whipple «fe Gitchell, Matteawan, Felt Hats. 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 140 



FREEDMEN'S RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

Rev. Edgar Brett, Agent, Fishkill Landing- 



TRANSPORTATION. 



Barge Independence, Bmndage & Ladue, Long "Wharf.. Leaves 
Fishkill Lauding every Tuesday and Friday ; New York every Mod 
•lay and Thursday. 

Ferry Boat Union, Captain 0. Lozier. Hourly trips between 
Fishkill Lauding and Xewburgh. 

Hudson River Railroad, A. R. Macay, Agent. 

American Express, Patrick Kelly, Ageut, at H. R. R. Depot. 

Merchants Union Express, Chas. Perrine, Agent, H. R. R. Depot. 

Matteawan and Xewburgii Express, S. Tompkins, Proprietor. 



TWENTY FIRST REGIMENT N. Y. S. N. C. 

Regimental Officers. 
Colonel, Joseph "Wright; Lieutenant-Colonel, H. G. Eastman; Ma- 
jor, George L.Dennis; Engineer, Sidney Seofield ; Adjutant, Rob- 
ert L. Carpenter; Surgeon, A. E. Yan Deuser; Quartermaster, J. 11. 
Marshall; Assistant Surgeon, Jno. P. Schenck, Jr.; Chaplain, G. M. 
McEckron. 

Non-Commissioned Staff. 

Sergeant Major, James Smith, Jr.; Quartermaster Sergeaut, John R. 
Slee; Standard Bearers, William I. Smith, David A. Honeyman; 
Commissary Sergeaut, G. W. McLellan ; Trumpet Major, C. M. Wink- 
ler ; Hospital Steward, J. H. Lindley. 

Denning Guard. 
Co. H. — H. H. Hustis, Captain; Samuel Underbill, 1st Lieuteuant ; 
"William X. Anthony, 2d Lieutenant; David K. Tillott, 2d second 
Lieutenant. 

BANKS. 

Mechanics' Savings Bank. — Organized 1866. Office corner of 
Main Street and South Avenue, Fishkill Landing. Open dai'y from 
9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Joseph Howland, President ; Win. S. Yerplanck, 
.lames Mackin, Yiee Presidents; "William C. Oakley, Treasurer ; John 
T. Smith, Secretary. 



"Walter Brett, President . Darnel BrinckerhofT. Vice-President. 

W. C. Oakley, Cashier. 

(Hte &\x$i gational ganfc o* JijsfoMtt £aiuHniu 

DESIGNATED DEPOSITORY U. S. 
FISHKILL-ON-THE- HUDSON, N. Y. 

We buy and sell at the most liberal current rates, and keep on 
on hand a full supply of 

GOVERNMENT BONDS OF ALL ISSUES 

SEVEN X H I IR. X I E S , 

AND 

COMPOUND INTEREST NOTES. 

We execute all orders and transact all business connected with 
the Government with dispatch. 



141 



DIRECTOBS, 

WALTER BRETT, 1). BRINCKERHOFF, 

JOSEPH MOWLAM), (HAS. M. WOLCOTT, 

JOHN P. DEWINT, JAMES MA ('KIN, 

H. H. HUSTIS, WM. TELLER, 

JOSEPH EL BLOSSOM. 



"In Prosperty remember Adversity."— " despise Not the Day of 
Small Things." 

1857. JteftMtt Jtoviitg** jfrnstitutc, 1866. 

FtSHKILL, DUTCHESS COUNTY, N, Y. 



The Trustees of the Fishkill Savings' Institute, incorporated by an 
Act of the Legislature of the State of New York, passed February 
25th, 1857, having organized in pursuance of the provisions of its 
Charter, is now open for the reception of deposits from 9 o'clock, a. m. 
to 3 o'clock, p. m„, Daily. Sundays and the usual Holidays excepted 

INTEREST AT THE RATE OF 6 PER CENT. 
PER ANNUM 

will be allowed on all sums of $5 and upwards, and not exceeding 
•$250, and interest at the rate of 5 per cent, on larger amounts The 
interest on such Deposits will be credited quarterly, on the first days 
of January, April, July and October, and if not drawn out, will be ad- 
ded to the principal, and will also draw interest. 

Copies of the Rules and Regulations may be had of either of the 
Trustees, or of the Treasurer, at the Office, of the Institute, corner of 
Bedford Avenue, entrance from Main Street 



John Jaycox, Adolphus Vandewater, 

Hyuian B. Rosa, William H. Wells, 

Halsey F. Walcott, Coert A. Van Yoorhis, 

Alexander Hasbrouk, Richard H. Brinckerhoff, 

Charles DuBois, John Rothery, 

Samuel A. Hayt, Henry D. Sherwood, 

T. Van Wyck Brinckerhoff, James E. Yan Steenbergh. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD: 

T. Yan Wyck Brinckerhoff, President. 
C A. Yan Yoorhis, 1st Yice-Prest. D. W. Gitchell, 2d Yice-Prest. 

Edward H. Bedford, Secretary. 
James E. Yan Steenbergh, Treasurer. 

EF"Employers will advance the interests of their help, by inducing 
them to avail themselves of the advantages of this Institution. 

142 



CAPITAL 200,000 DOLLARS. 

JAMES E. VAN STEENBERGH, Cashier. SAMUEL A. HAYT, President. 

Established as a Statk Institution, Re-Organized as a Nation,- i. Bank, 

Jun e I, 1850. April I, 1865. 

mu iattaal §»»& of ixMitl, iiMill, |t. f . 

Quarterly Report of its Condition Oct. I, 1866. 

v RES OlfR C E S . 

Notes and Bills Discounted 8257,793 78 

Indebtedness of Directors 7,100 00 

Stocks of the State of New York, deposited in Bank Department at 

Albany 15,000 00 

New York State Stocks on hand, 50,000 00 

65,000 00 

U. S. Bonds deposited with IT. S. Treasurer to secure C.rculating 

Notes 205,000 00 

United States Stock on hand . 8,000 00 

213,000 00 

Cash Items, including U. S. Revenue Stamp-;, 5,437 87 

Real Estate (Banking House) 8,000 00 

Overdrafts ] ,391 33 

U. S. Revenue Taxes paid 2,121 II 

Current Expenses " 1.040 24 

Due from National Banks 29 .797 02 

Cash on hand : 

Circulating Notes of National Banks 8,58s 00 

State Banks. 466 00 

Bank of Fishkill 2,105 00 

11,156 00 

Other Lawful Money, viz : 

Legal Tender Notes 16,110 00 

Compound Interest Notes 13,540 00 

29.650 00 

Specie 39 

United States Fractional Currency 982 96 

Total Resources $625,763 31 

L I A B I LIT I E S . 

Capital Stock $200,000 00 

Profits— Surplus Fund 40,0011 01 1 

" — Discount Received 3,637 78 

'■ — Exchange " 101 06 

" —Interest " 3,112 50 

" — Reserved Fund 413 54 

7,264 88 

Circulating Notes ree'd from Comptroller of the Currency. . 175. 2 K) 00 
Less amount on hand 2,500 00 

Circulation outstanding 172.70(1 00 

Due Depositors 137,664 35 

Dividends unpaid 355 00 

Due to National-Banks 30,596 99 

SpecialLoan L5.000 00 

Due Fishkill Savings Institute 9,182 09 

Circulation of Hank of Fishkill outstanding assumed by this Bank.. 13,000 00 

Total Liabilities ■. .$625,763 31 

DIEECTORS: 
Samuel A. Hay t, John Graham, Samuel Ilustis, L. C. Rapalye, Lewis II. 
White, Charles L Du Bois, Halsey F. Walcott, Coert A. Van Voorhis, Sylvester 
Southard, Samuel Van Vechten, Cornelius Remsen, William II. Wells, Richard 
II. Uiinckerhoff. 

143 



HPfpInteresl allowed on Deposits at tlie rate of 6 per cent, per annum, on sums 
not exceeding 8250; 5 psr cent, on larger amounts— credited Quarterly, on the 1st 
days of January, April, July and October. 

Incorporated February 25, 1857. 

"IMtfeitl $mim$ institute," Jirtfcitt, §. f. 

An Incorporated Institution for Savings — cf its condition, 
On Monday Morning, July Sd, 18(36. 

RESOU R C E S. 

Bonds and Mortgages on Real Estate, worth double the amount, 

exclusive of improvements thereon 812,300 00 

S tock Investments, viz : 

State of New York '. 5.000 00 

City of Poughkeepsie 10,400 00 

City of New York 5,000 00 

20,400 00 

Stocks of the United States, viz : 

5 percent. 1871 1,000 00 

5 percent. 1874 5,000 00 

5 per cent. 10-40's .43,000 00 

6 per cent. 5-20's 60,000 00 

percent 1881 7,500 00 

116,500 00 

United States 7 3-10 Treasury Notes.. 5,000 00 

Cash on Deposit in National Bank of Pishkill 1,879 98 

Personal Estate (Eire and Burglar Proof Safe) 1.800 00 

Expense Account, viz : Books. Stationery, Salaries , Rent. Revenue 

Taxes, &c, since its organization, March 14, 1857 6,254 58 

Total Resources $164,134 56 

LIABILITIES. 

Due to De positors $138,792 45 

Surplus Profits — in reserve, viz : 

Interest Account — balance 8,633 94 

Premium Account " s 16,708 17 

25.342 11 

Total Liabilit ies $164,134 56 

Decrease during the year— 1865 35,082 43 

Amount received for interest during calendar year '65 9,417 50 

Amount placed to credit of depositors 6,898 35 

TRTTSTEES: 
T. V. W. Brinckerhoff, John Boyce, John Jaycox, Alex Hasbrook, 

L. C. Rapelje, A. Vandewater, Hyman B. Rosa, D. W. Gitchell, 

William H. Wells, A. W. Armstrong, Halsey F. Walcott, Milton A. Fowler, 

Coert A. Van Voorhis, O. M. Baxter, Sylvester Southard, Edw. H. Bedford, 

Henry D Sherwood, Richard B. Cary, Charles Boyd, John Rothery, 

Samuel A. Hayt, Garret Dubois, Jacob G. Van Wyck, James E. Dean, 

Richard H. Brinkerhoff.Charles Dubois, Jas. E. Van Steenbergh. 

OFFICERS: 

T. VAN WYCK BRINCKERHOFF, President. 

C. A. VAN VOORHIS, 1st Vice-President. 

D. W. GITCHELL, 2d Vice-President. 
EDWARD H. BEDFORD, Secretary. 
JAMES E VAN STEENBERGH, Treasurer. 



MILTON A. FOWLER, Attorney. 



144 



145 DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL, 



LIST OF SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

Wappingers Falls — Episcopal, Baptist, Presbyterian. 

Hughsonyille — Presbyterian. 

Carthage Landing — Methodist, Episcopal. 

New Hackensack — Reformed Dutch. 

Myers' Corner — Southern District. 

Fishkill — Reformed Dutch, Episcopal, Methodist 

Glenham— -Reformed Dutch, Episcopal, Methodist. 

Matteaavan — Presbyterian, Episcopal, Baptist, Methodist, Union. 

Fishkill Landing — Reformed Dutch, Methodist, Tioronda Branch. 



CEMETERIES. 

Fishkill Rural Cemetery, organized April 25th, 1866, under 
the laws of the State. 

Trustees — L. H. White, President; S A. Hayt, Vice-President ; 
H. B. Rosa, Secretary; James E. Dean, Treasurer; Miles Scofield, 
Alexander Bartow, J. G. Van TV'yck, E. H. Bedford, J. E. Van Steen- 
bergh, James Van Wyck, M. A. Fowler, R. H. Brinckerhoff. 

Grounds contain about twenty-seven acres, situated about quarter 
a mile north of Fishkill Village. These grounds are admirably suited 
for the sacred purpose to which they have beeu dedicated, and have 
been laid out and arranged with great taste and skill. The rules of 
this association, while liberal, are calculated to preserve harmony and 
beauty, and promote the growth and perpetuity of the organization. 

The Wappingers Falls Cemetery contains about twenty acres, 
but as the grounds are situated in the town of Poughkeepsie, do not 
strictly come within our province. 

The Episcopal Cemetery, on the north side of the creek at 
Matteawan.and one adjoining, connected with the PresbyterianChurch, 
though small, are well located and kept in good order, especially the 
tbrnier, which evidences a g 1 deal of taste and culture. 

The Catholics have purchased several acres near the foot of the 
mountain at Matteawan, which they intend for a Cemetery. 

The Methodist Cemetery on the north road between Mattea- 
wan and Fishkill Landing, is well arranged and neatly kept, but is 
small and nearly filled. 

The Reformed Ditch Cemetery at Fishkill Landing is near the 
Church, and is one of the oldest in town. It is well kept, and con- 
tains several vaults. 



wmlhalb &ii rrtaii 



ti-lo 



j\.rc THE 



GLENHAM STORE, 

WILL BE FOUND A LARGE STOCK OF 

(ffloots and Shoes ; 

utfini, s[e©sSa1&¥, hibdwibi. 

Carpets, Drugs, &c, &c. 

All goods appertaining to a country store, will be found in GREAT 
VARIETY, and offered at LOWEST PRICKS, exclusively for 

Cash or Barter. 



©sag ip&iiss, S3® ©bwq&'O'ikdibi. 

Store Keepers, Hotel Proprietors, Farmers, 

AND OTHERS WILL FIND IT FOR THEIR 
INTEREST TO CALL. 
I^FARM PRODUCE WANTED. 

GLENHAM COMPANY, Proprietors. 
THOMAS SULLIVAN, Manager. 



POUGHKEEPSIE 



Extracts from Report of "Board of Examiners," June, 1865. 

In teaching, as in every other vocation, two things are especially 
requisite for success, — genius to devise the best mode, and ability to 
put that mode in practical operation. These the committee have 
found beautifully combined and illustrated in the daily routine of the 
Poughkeepsie Female Academy. ****** 

In the classes in History, Rhetoric, Moral Science, and Kames' Ele- 
ments of Criticism, each topic was accurately analyzed in a manner 
entirely satisfactory to the Committee, and most creditable to both 
teachers and pupils. But the excellence and beauty of the method 
was especially illustrated by the classes in the Mathematics ; particu- 
larly in Geometry and Trigonometry. * * * Such a mathematical 
exhibition the Committee have never witnessed, either in our higher 

schools, for young men, or in colleges. 

* * * * 

In Philosophy and Chemistry, the pupils exhibited the same ease 
and familiar knowledge, for which the previous examinations in other 
studies had prepared the Committee. * 

In music it was evident that the pupils were so thoroughly ground- 
ed in the principles of harmony, and skilled in their expression, as 
they and others had shown themselves to be in other departments of 
science, while it proved equally the high attainments and classic taste 
of their accomplished Teachers. 

The classes in French went through one of the most severe examin- 
ations which a most severe teacher could conflict, and come off with 
great credit to themselves and to their instructor. The accuracy of 
pronunciation, as well as the intimate and understanding knowledge 
of that difficult language shown, were remarkable. 

Nor have they been less impressed with the "Home Department," 
as it may be called. The principal and Mrs. Wright have succeeded 
to a surprising degree, in providing the care and comforts of a refined 
and christian home to those who become inmates of their family. 

If the Committee have omitted to speak specially of other studies 
or departments, it is to avoid making their report too prolix. 

G. M. McECKKON, Chairman. 

M. S. Beach, Secretary. 



170, 172, 174 & 176 Greenwich St., 

(one square west of Broadway,) 

Between Courtland and Dey Streets, New York. 
JOHN PATTEN, Jr., Proprietor. 



The PACIFIC HOTEL is well and widely known to the traveling 
public. The location is especially suitable to merchants and business 
men, it is in close proximity to the business part of the City — is on the 
highway of Southern and Western travel — and adjacent to all the 
principal Railroad and Steamboat depots. 

The Pacific has liberal accommodation for over 300 guests ; it is 
well furnished, and possesses every modern improvement for the com- 
fort and entertainment of its inmates. The rooms are spacious and 
well ventilated; provided with gas and water; the attendance is 
prompt and respectful; and the table is generously provided with 
every delicacy of the season. 

The subscriber, who, for the past few years, has been the lessee, is 
now sole proprietor, and intends to identify himself thoroughly with 
the interests of his house. With long experience as a hotel-keeper, 
he trusts, by moderate charges and a liberal policy, to maintain the 
favorable reputation of the Pacific Hotel. 

N". B. — To prevent overcharges by Hackmen, the coaches are owned 
by the proprietor. 

JOHN PATTEN, Jr. 



BOOK m 1USIC STORE, 




No. 47 WATEE STREET, 

looks, ifitliiarfg Music, 

A N I > 

MUSIC A?. IKTSTRII rM3S STS, 

Artists' Materials, Tube Colors, Brushes, Varnish, 

Crayons, Lithographs, &o, &c 

PRINCE & CO.'S CELEBRATED PRIZE MEDAL 



IS 



5 



WITH DIVIDED AM> GRADUATED SWELL. 

SABBATH SCHOOLS 

AND 

PUBLIC LIBRARIES 

Supplied with Books and Requisites 
AT NEW YORK AND PHILADELPHIA PRICJES. 



DIRECTORY OF FISIIKILL. 14P> 



VILLAGES. 

Fishkill Landing, the only incorporated village in the town, 
was incorporated by an Act of the Legislature in 1864. It is situated 
on the Hudson River, directly opposite Newbnrgh, and is about sixty 
miles from New York City. The business portion of the village is on 
the hill, a quarter of a mile from the Hudson River Railroad Depot. 
It is a post village, contains three churches ; two select and one public 
school, a National and a Savings Bank, a printing office (the MshJciU 
Standard), one hotel, an armory, a large number of stores, and a 
machine shop and foundry. The Boston, Hartford and Erie Railroad, 
is in course of construction to this place, to connect with the Erie 
Railway by a ferry across the Hudson. The ferry boat Union now 
plys bftween Fishkill Landing and Newbnrgh. Its charter dates 
back to 1743. Population about 1550. 

Byunsville (or Tioronda) is a small place about a mile south of 
Fishkill Landing, at the mouth of Fishkill Creek. It has a small but 
elegant church edifice, with a school room, built through the liberality 
of Gen. Joseph Rowland; a grist and saw mill, and a store Mail 
matter intended for this village should be directed to Fishkill Landing. 
The first mill erected in this town was at this place, some time 
before 1709. 

Matteawan is situated about half a mile east of Fishkill Landing. 
It is a post village, contains five churches, a select and a Union Free 
School, two hat manufactories, two file shops, two machine shops, 
flour mill, several stores, one hotel and a public hall It is a thriving 
place, and has a population of about 1600. The Boston, Hartford and 
Erie Railroad will pass through the centre of it, along the creek. Mat- 
teawan and Fishkill Landing are destined to become one before many 
years, the intervening place, a level plain on the high road, beginning 
to be built up The house now occupied by Hon. Isaac Teller and 
sister at Matteawan, was one of the first built iu the town, and be- 
longed to Roger Brett, a son-in-law of Rombout, one of the original 
settlers. It was built about 1710. The house is one story, eighty- 
seven by thirty-six feet, the sides and roof covered by cedar shingles. 
It was often filled with officers and soldiers in the Revolution, and 
salt was stored in its cellar for the army. Matteawan lies at the base 
of North Beacon and South Beacon, two lofty summits of the Fish- 
kill range of mountains. The former is one thousand four hundred 
and seventy feet high, the latter one thousand six hundred and eighty 
above tide. 

Wiccapee is about a quarter of a mile south of Matteawan, and 



147 DIKECTOKY OF FTSHKILT. 



consists of a collection of dwellings inhabited by the employees of the' 
Xew York Rubber Works, which is located on the Fishkill Creek at 
this point. It has postal communication through the Matteawan 
post office. 

Glenham is about two miles north-cast of Matteawan, noted for its 
extensive woolen manufactory. It is a post village, has three churches, 
two schools, a public hall, and several stores. The scenery along the 
Fishkill Creek at this point is quite romantic. 

Groveville is a small place just south of Glenham, and contains 
a branch of the woolen manufactory. It is very pleasantly situated, 
and has postal communication through Glenham, of which it is a 
suburb. 

Fishkill is about five miles from Fishkill Landing, on the Fishkill 
Creek. It is a post village, contains three churches, a select and a 
Union Free School a National and a Savings Bank, a printing office, 
(the Mshkill Journal), and has about 1000 inhabitants. The Boston, 
Hartford and Erie Railroad will pass through it. 

Myers' Corners, Swartwoutvjlle, and Brixckeriiofkville, 
are small places north-eastof Fishkill, and have postal communication 
through it. The latter has one church. 

Carthage Landing (or Low Point) is about three miles north 
of Fishkill Landing, and lies on the bank of the river. It is a post- 
village, has two churches, a school, several stores, and a hotel. It 
contains about 300 inhabitants. 

BaxtertoWN is about two miles north of Fishkill Landing, and 
east of the main road. It is a small settlement of colored people, 
and has a church of the Methodist denomination. 

ILghsonville is about seven miles north of Fishkill Lauding, on 
the post road, and about two miles from the Hudson River. It is a 
post-village, contains a church, a school, two hotels, and several stores. 

MlDDLEM'Sii is a small settlement a short distance east of Mugh- 
sonville ; has a church and school house. Does its trading and has 
postal communication through Hughsonville. 

Wappingers Falls is at the head of navigation on Wappingers 
Creek, a mile and a half from the Hudson River, and lies partly in 
the town of Poughkeepsie. It is a post-village, has four churches, 
a select and public school, two hotels, and numerous stores. It is 
largely engaged in manufacturing, containing two cotton mills, an 
iron foundry, and a comb factory. Population about 1500. 

ISTew Hackensack is four miles north-cast of Wappingers Falls, 
and is a post- village. It has a church, a school and a hotel. 



DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 14S 



EDUCATIONAL. 

A Word to the Young Men of our Country, and 
to Parents who have Sons to Educate. 

The very best school in this country is our home institution, East- 
man's National Business College, at Poughkeepsie, and we are sur- 
prised that every young man in our county, who has three months to 
spare and one hundred dollars, does not pursue the course of study 
there. This College is now attracting no little attention among edu- 
cators and business men, on account of its thorough practical course 
of business training by an interesting mode of instruction, combining 
theory and practice. So popular has this institution become, that at 
present there are twelve hundred students in attendance in the dif- 
ferent departments. It is patronized by a large number of our leading 
citizens. Particulars of the College may be obtained by addressing 
the president, Professor Eastman, at Poughkeepsie. 



SOCIETIES. 

Beacon Lodge, Xo. 283, F. & A. M., Matteawan. In a flourish- 
ing condition, with an excellent membership. Meets every Tuesday 
evening. Its officers are s 

R. D. Hine, W. M. ; W. R. Brown, S. W. ; Samuel- Sewell, J. W. ; 
George Miller, Treasurer; E. S. Phillips, Secretary; F. H. Hanson, 
S. D.; W. H. Garrison, J. P. ; Abram Lane, Tyler; R. D. Hine, W. 
R. Brown, Samuel Sewell, George Miller, AY. C. Han-is, Trustees. 

Evergreen Lodge, No 131, I. 0. 0. F., Matteawan. Instituted 
at Fishkill Landing, December 10th, 1844. In good condition and 
membership. Meets every Wednesday evening. The officers are : 

Edwin Campbell, X. G.; Sinclair Stevenson, Y. G. ; AY. C. Harris, 
Treasurer; W. J. Taylor, Secretary; John Lane, J. M. Wood, Sam'l 
J. Bailey, Trustees 

Sons of Temperance, Division 43, Matteawan ; organized 1866. 
Meets at Mechanics' Hall every Saturday evening. Its officers are : 

P. L. Yan Houten, W. P. ; Lvnde Belknap, P. W. P. ; A. Atwood, 
W. A. ; Wm. Pearsall, C. ; L. Conine, A. S. ; Rev. J. Y. Bates, Chap- 
lain ; R. F. Elsden, Treasurer ; 1ST. Hyatt, Rec. Scribe ; R. L. Carpen- 
ter, Assistant Scribe ; S. P. Cridland, F. S. ; G. Falkner, I.S.; W. 
D. Syers, 0. S. 

Town Convention of Sabbath Schools — Meets three times a 
year in different localities, in January, June, and September. G. M. 



14:9 DIRECTORY OF FISHKLLL. 



Clapp, President, Wappingers Falls; John B. Jones, Secretary, New 
Haekeasack ; Milton A. Fowler, Treasurer, Fishkill. 

Lafatette Lodge, No. 18, I. 0. 0. F., Wappingers Falls. Is 
one of the oldest Lodges in the State. 



NEWSPAPERS. 



The New York Packet and American Advertiser, published by 
Samuel Loudon, was removed iroui New York when the British took 
possession of the city, and was first issued at Fishkill, October 1, 1776. 
It was removed to New York again after the close of the war. 

The Free Press was started at Fishkill in 1841, by Fred. W. Kit 
ter. In 1842 it was removed to Ponghkeepsie ; its name was changed 
to the Dutchess Free Press, and was continued until 1844. 

The Fishkill Journal was started in 1853, by H. A. Guild, and 
discontinued in 1855. 

The American Banner was started at Ponghkeepsie in 1856, by 
Charles J. Ackert, In 1857 it was removed to Fishkill, and was 
changed to the Dutcliess County Tinas, passing into the hands of J. 
Carpenter Mills. Mr. A. W. Loornas succeeded Mr. Mills, and chang- 
ed the name to The Fishkill .Journal. In 1860 Mr. Caleb M. flotaling 
took charge of the Journal, followed by Mr. Charles F. Wilber in 
1862; Messrs. Dean & Fowler in ISC.:!; and Mr. George W. Owen in 
1866, by whom it is still carried on, under an association of gentle- 
men who have been its possessors for a number of years. 

The Fishkill Standard was started August 'id, 1842, at Fishkill 
Landing, by "William K. Addington. In 1860 it passed into the hands 
of a Mr. Webster, by whom it was published three months, when it 
was sold to W. A Van Wagenen ami Aaron Vanderwerker, who pub- 
lished it under the firm name of A. Vanderwerker & Co. In October, 
1861, Mr. Van Wagenen sold his interest to Rufus A. Reed, when the 
firm name was changed to Reed & Vanderwerker, by whom it was 
published four months. In February, l^t'.i, it was purchased by 
James E. Member, with John W. Spaight as editor, by whom it is 
still carried on. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Military Hall, Fishkill Landing. Mechanics' Hall, Matteawan. 

Glenham Hall, Glenham. 



^ SSPlrS ££•■ 88 .^ 






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EXECUTED IN THE VEKY BEST STYLE, 

AT THE OFFICE OF THE 




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we arc prepared i<> »li> 'KJ'Sr 

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M>fa <g teMiill J>tanM, 



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THE STANDARD 

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Aims in he among the besl papers of its class published; giving the IJm^ 
News of i lie Day, all the Local Intelligence, Correspondence, S*lb 
Miscellany, Stories, Poetry, «fec. Its large and constantly 
increasing circulation makes it a superior 



iADYKBTiSlNG lIBWlj 



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$2 « <%&a*,, 



%l»v»y» in Arivnnce. 



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J. E. MEMBER, 

Proprietor. 




J. W. SPAIGHT, II 

Editor and Publisher. ?£j]r\ 



DIRECTORY OF FISH KILL. 150 



CHURCHES. 

First Reformed Dutch Church, Fishkill Village, organized 1716; 
first building erected 1731 ; present building 1784, Rev. F. M. Kip, 
D. D., Pastor 

Reformed Dutch Church, New Hackensack, organized 1758; first 
building erected 1766; present building 1834, Rev. C. Van Cleef, 

D, D., Pastor. 

Reformed Dutch Church, Fishkill Lauding, organized 1820 ; present 
building erected 1860. Rev. M. L. Beiger, Pastor. The consistory 
is composed of the following gentlemen, besides the Pastor: Elders, 
Walter Brett, John Van Vliet, Epenetus Crosby, "William Teller, 
Henry Churchill,- Deacons, William H. Rogers, Granville Yan Vliet", 
P. L. Yan Houten, John Place, Gideon H. Carswell. 

Reformed Dutch Church, Glenham, organized 1837, Rev. F. A. 
Horton, Pastor. 

Presbyterian Church, BrinckerhofTville, organized 1747 ; new build- 
ing erected 1830; burned down 1866. Rev. G, T. Woodhull, Pastor. 

Presbyterian Church, Matteawan; organized August 27th, 1833, 
and building erected same year. Rev. F. R. Masters, Pastor 

Presbyterian Church, Hughsonville, an offshoot from the Church at 
New Hamburgh; building erected 1840. Rev. Ira C. Tyson, Pastor. 

Presbvterian Church, "Wappingers Falls, organized 1847; building 
erected 1848. Rev. Win. W. Newell, Jr., Pastor. 

Methodist Episcopal Church, Fishkill Lauding, organized Sept. 
*24th, 1860. Building erected by Presbyterian Society in 1849, and 
purchased of them. Rev. 0. Y. Amerman, Pastor. Trustees, James 

E. Shurter, Nicholas Hopper, John H. Briuckerhoff, William X. 
Vauderwerker, Jas. Ackerman, Stephen Saunters, Thomas Aldridge, 
John W. Spaight, Daniel Leach. 

Methodist Episcopal Church, Matteawan, organized 1860 ; building 
erected in 1861. dedicated in 1862. Rev. J. Y. Bates, Pastor. 

Methodist Episcopal Church, Glenham, present building erected 
1841. Rev. Mr. Abrahams, Pastor. 

Methodist Episcopal Church, Fishkill, organized 1829 ; church build- 
ing erected 1838. Rev. A. L. Culver, Pastor. 

Methodist Episcopal Church, Carthage Landing, organized 1823 ; 
church building erected 1833. 

Methodist Episcopal Church, Middlebush ; church edifice purchased 
of the Baptists about 1826. 

Episcopal Church, (Trinity,) Fishkill Village, organized 1765; 
church building erected 1760. Rev. J. R. Livingston, Pastor. 



151 DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 

Episcopal Church, (Zion,) TYappingers Falls, organized and building 
erected in 1834. Rev. G. B. Andrews, Rector. 

Episcopal Chnreh, (St. Anna's,) Matteawan, was incorporated on 
the 11th day of Jnne, 1833, under the temporary rectorship of Rev. 
John Brown. The first regular Rector was the Rev. R. B. Yan 
Eleeck. Present Rector, Rev.^Henry E. Duncan, who entered upon 
his duties ISTov. 6, 1854. The vestry is composed of the following gen- 
tlemen besides the Rector : Messrs. J. S. Rumsey, M. D., and J. B. 
Seaman, Wardens ; Messrs. Isaac Teller, Charles Davies, Adrian Y. 
Enevels, Abraham Yan Tine, Cornelius Yan Tine, Henry E. Davies, 
Henry Slack, T. J. B. Sehenck, Vestrymen. The church owns eleven 
acres of land east of Fishkill Creek, where a new church, parsonage, 
and Parish school house are to be erected. 

Episcopal Church, Carthage Banding, chnreh building erected 1865. 

Episcopal Church, (Free Church of St. John Baptist,) Glenham, 
organized 1855; church buildiug erected 1858. Rev. J. R. Living- 
ston, Rector. 

Baptist Church, Matteawan, organized in 1853; building erected in 
1855. 

Baptist Church, Wappingers Falls, organized 1838; church edifice 
erected 1847. Rev. II. I). Doolittle, Pastor. 

Roman Catholic Church, Matteawan, organized about 1852 ; build- 
ing commenced in 1855. Rev. James Coyle, Pastor. 

Roman Catholic Church, Fishkill, church edifice erected 1861. — 
Under charge of Rev. James Coyle. 

Roman Catholic Church, Wappingers Falls. Rev. Mr. Shechan, 
Pastor. 

Zion Pilgrim M. E. Church, (colored), Baxtertowh, church build- 
ing erected 1848. 

Zion M. E. (colored) Church, Fishkill Landing; organized 1840: 
building erected 1844. Rev. Mr. Roberts, Pastor. 



FISHKILL GAS LIGHT COMPANY. 

At Fishkill Village. Organized in 1857. R. B. Cary, President; 
Augustus Hughson, Secretary ; J. E. Yan Steenbergh, Treasurer. 
Capital Stock $10,000. Is the only gas-light company in the town ; 
hut gas is used by several of the manufactories in the different villages. 



102 DIRECTORY OF FISHKILL. 

FIRE DEPARTMENTS, 

Engine Xo. 4, Fishkill Landing. Excellent engine, but no organi- 
zation. 

Engine Xo. 2, Matteawau. 
Engine Xo. 3, Matteawan. 
Engine Xo. 4, Fishkill. 



INTERNAL REVENUE. 

James Mackin, U. S. Assessor. Office Xo. 5 South Avenue, Fish- 
kill Landing. 
James Dearin, Assistant Assessor. Office, Fishkill. 
E. M. Goring, Collector, Wappingers Falls. 
John W. Gaunt, Cigar Inspector, Glenham. 



BASE BALL CLUBS. 



Lone Star, Matteawau. , 
Live Oak, Matteawau. 
Larks, Matteawau. 
Excelsior, Wappingers Falls. 
Actives, Wappingers Falls. 
United States, Fishkill. 
Dart Eagles, Glenham. 
Eivermout, Fishkill Landing. 
Ellsworth, Fishkill Lauding. 



BANDS. 

Highland Serenades, Matteawan and Fishkill Landing, 0. Grant, 
Leader. 

Highland Serenaders' Brass Band, William Green, Leader. 
Grant and Conway's Cotillion Band, Matteawau ; C. Grant and 
Martin Conway, Leaders. 
Gleuham Band, Glenham. 



THE FLOWER'S JflME. 



Here is the garden she walked across, 

Arm hi ami such a short time since ; 
Hark, now I push its wicket, the moss 

Hinders the hinges and makes them wince ' 
She must have reached this shrub ere she turned, 

As back with that uvnrmer the wicket swung, 
Forshe laid the poor snail, my chance foot 
spurned, 

To feed and forget in the leaves among. 

Down this side of the gravel walk [box : 

She went, while her robe's edge brushed the 
And here she paused iu her gracious talk 

To point mf a moth ou the milk-white phlox. 
Roses, ranged in valiant row, 

I will never think that she passed yon by I 
She loves you, noble roses, I know ; 

But yonder see, where the rock plants lie ! 

This flower she stopped at, finger on lip, 

Stooped over, in doubt, as settling its claim; 
Till she gave me, with pride to make no slip. 

Its soft, meandering Spanish name. 
What a name ! Was it love or praise ] 

Speech half-asleep or song half-awake? 
I must learn Spanish, one of these days, 

Only for that slow, sweet name's sake. 

Roses, if I live aud do well, 

I may bring her one of these days. 
To fix you last with as fine a spell. 

Fit you each with his Spanish phrase ! 
But do not detain me now ; for she lingers 

There, like sunshine over the ground, 
And ever I see her soft, white fingers 

Searching after the bud she found. 

Flower, you Spaniard, look that you grow not — 

Stay as you are and be loved forever! 
Bud, if I kiss you, 'tis that you blow not, 

Mind, the shut pink mouth opens never' 
For while thus it pouts, her fingers wrestle. 

Twinkling, the audacious leaves between. 
Till round they turn and down they nestle, — 

Is not the dear mark still to he seen I 

Where I found her not, beauties vanish ; 

Whether I follow her beauties flee; 
Is there no method to tell her in Spanish [me. 

June's twice June since she breathed it with 
Come, bud. show me the least of her traces. 

Treasure my lady's lightest footfall. 
— Ah, you may flout and turn up your faces. — 

Roses, 70U arc not so fair after all ! 



' " " : i j-rj 



Smith & Stotesbury, 

No. 30 Main Street, Fislakill ILuiicliiig', 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

SELECT -A.3STID STAPLE GROCEPvIES, 

such as 

FtOUB, FEED, PROVISIONS, POHK t FISH, 

Sugars? Teas, Coffees, 
BUTTER, CHEESE, TOBACCO, SEGARS, 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

FRUITS, CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES, 

V700DEKT ^IT-A.IIE, 

and all things usually kept iu a first class grocery. 
WM. J. SMITH. . CHAS. STOTESBTJRY. 




WJL 1. 'B4DGSBS, 

No. 19 MAIN STREET, 

F i s h k ill JL a n d i n g , 



DEALER IN 



m 



SHEET IROM WAHE, 

JUIW^v, Hardware, and Glass Ware. 
PLOPiONQ & JOBBING 

PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

IROORNG, GUTTERS, *C„ 

done with despatch and on liberal terms. 
REMEMBER TEE OLD ESTABLISHED STAND, 19 MATN-ST. 






3VX A. ITT IS A- -W A. TO". 




J. H. DOUGHTY. M. D.. . 

3F»H7irSICJI-A.3Xr -A-jNTID SURGEON. 

Office in Tompkins' Block, Mattf.awax. 
Hours from 8 to Jl a. in., and 2 to 5 p. in. Residence, house lately 
occupied by W. "W. DeVeau, opposite Mr. Harvey Brett's. Slate at 
Moith'8 Drug Store, FishJdll Landing. 

DEALERS IN 

(Teas, tffcfliK family $vomic$ and ^rovteiowsi, 

,?J ^TT«.JIF *£ .V. 



R. I). HINE & SON, 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, GLOVE?, 
Carriage liobes, &c, 



MATTEA W -A. 3ST 



rlia.AP GROCERY A\D PROVISION 






FASBION.AMi .K MUQRCH &NT VAU.OR, 

AND DEALER IN 

GENT'S FURNISHING GOODS. CUTTING, CLEANING AND 

KKI'A I RING done in the neatest maimer and with despatch. 

Fay's New BuiUlina, Matteawan.